Smith School In the News

The Smith School's world-class faculty are routinely quoted in leading business and other media, while Smith's innovative programs and research projects also receive attention. Below are some highlights.

September 2021

USA Today – Sept. 17 – Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design Gerald Suarez (Thinking About a Career Switch? Here's What You Should Keep in Mind.) and Associate Professor of Management and Organization Rellie Derfler-Rozin (Follow this Advice When Negotiating for Your Next Job) are featured as career-advice guest contributors. … Related coverage at Localiq.

Maryland Today – Sept. 17 – “Spotlight on Faculty and Staff for Convocation” includes

Distinguished University Professor and Special Advisor to the Dean Ritu Agarwal receiving the President’s Medal for “extraordinary contributions to the intellectual, social and cultural life of Maryland.”

Clear Admit – Sept. 16 – Senior Director of Admissions for MBA and Specialty Masters Programs Maria Pineda highlights Nicole Coomber and Vijaya Venkataramani as faculty of interest to prospective MBAs, as part of the “Admissions Director Q&A” series.

Bizwomen (The Business Journals) – Sept. 15 – “Gender Pay, Promotion Gaps Wider in Academia Than in Industry, Research Shows” overviews Nature-published research ‘Trends in gender pay gaps’ by Rudolph Lamone Chair of Strategy and Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal and Associate Professor of Strategy and Innovation Waverly Ding.

Science Newsnet – Sept. 15 – Logistics, Business and Public Policy Professor and Chair Martin Dresner describes ‘Aviation’s (post-pandemic) Unprecedented Opportunity.’

Bloomberg Law – Sept. 14 – Associate Professor of Management Evan Starr contributes to “Gaming Industry Nondisclosures Become Key Test of #MeToo Laws ”: Broad nondisclosure agreements tend to be concentrated in the tech industry, but it is by no means the only industry where they are widely used, [said Starr] who has studied the impact of restrictive agreements. Starr said employees in states with laws restricting the reach of nondisclosure agreements are more willing to share information about their work experiences online. That willingness to speak can help end problematic employment practices perpetuated by NDAs, Starr said.

Salon – Sept. 12 – “The Psychological Toll of Wanting Your Kid to be ‘Perfect’” quotes Assistant Dean of the Full-Time MBA Program Nicole Coomber: "Autonomy is an important piece of this where you have to actually buy into whatever the goal is," [Coomber notes]. Requiring that a child practice piano for hours each day when they'd rather be playing soccer "can really backfire," she added. Kids can end up feeling like their parent's project or product — and push back by quitting. No matter how much bravado accompanies that move, there's often also a sense of having let themselves and their parents down.

CoinDesk – Sept. 12 – Professor of the Practice in Finance Clifford Rossi helps explain “DeFi (Decentralized Finance) and the 3 Cs”: There is a reason banks ask mortgage applicants for pay stubs and bank statements, and it’s not some twisted desire to make borrowers reveal their innermost secrets. “The foundation for determining the credit quality of secured consumer loans such as mortgages ... has been well-established over the years by the three Cs of underwriting,” [said Rossi]. In Rossi’s formulation, the Cs stand for “Creditworthiness or willingness-to-pay, Capacity to repay the obligation and Collateral (equity stake).” Other versions of this old banker’s saying also include a fourth C, for Capital (savings), and sometimes a fifth, for Conditions (reasons for taking out the loan). “Reliance on any one of the Cs might miss other important aspects of the borrower’s risk profile that could ultimately pose greater or lesser collective risk to the owner of that risk,” said Rossi, a former banking executive and regulator…

TalkMarkets – Sept. 11 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the “Year-To-Date Percentage Returns Of 8 Largest Stocks.”

WJLA ABC-7 – Sept. 11 – Commemorating the 20-year anniversary of the 9-11 terror attacks, Associate Clinical Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss is the subject of ‘Professor Recalls Arduous Journey out of NYC on 9/11, Shares Lessons Learned.’

U.S. News & World Report – Sept. 9 – Executive Director of MBA and M.S. Admissions Shelbi Brookshire contributes to “10 Ways to Nail Your MBA Interview: During group or team challenge interviews, an overbearing presentation is a deal-breaker, so it's essential to listen and collaborate well with others. During video calls, it's crucial to appear professional throughout, [says Brookshire]. "Test your technology, ensure you have good lighting and join the virtual interview on time… Brand and presence are still as important in digital formats.

SCIENMAG – Sept. 9 “What AI Analysis of 100 Million Social Media Interactions Can Teach Product Managers” overviews just-published research in the Journal of Marketing by Assistant Professor of Information and Decision Science Kunpeng Zhang and Associate Dean for Strategic Initiatives P.K. Kannan.  

AdvisorSmith – Sept. 9 – Professor of the Practice in Finance Clifford Rossi gives insights through a “Cyber Liability Insurance” Q&A.

WBAL TV (NBC-Baltimore) – Sept. 9 – Station President and General Manager Dan Joerres makes a recently aired segment featuring Associate Clinical Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss the focus of his “Remembering 9-11” editorial: University of Maryland Professor Elinda Kiss was in the World Trade Center complex on 9/11. Twenty years later, she chooses to remember the spirit of America, not the attack on America. "I don't want to ever see a situation like Sept. 11. I don't want to ever see us attacked. But I wish we could all be a little friendlier like we were in September many years ago," Kiss said. … Related: Maryland Today’s “9/11: 20 Years Later” includes Kiss recounting her ground zero experience of the 9-11 terror attacks.

Knowledge@Wharton – Sept. 7 - How Companies Can Benefit from Employees’ Emotions cites Myeong-Gu Seo as co-author of new research (‘Creative and Cross-Functional Benefits of Wearing Hearts on Sleeves’) in Organization Science.

Communication Intelligence – Sept. 5 – Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design Gerald Suarez comments extensively through “Why Specifically Compassion Is a Core Need and Helpful Leadership Asset.”

USA Today Network via The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel – Sept. 5 – Associate Professor of Management and Organization Rellie Derfler-Rozin’s op-ed gives “Tips to Getting, and Being Happy with, Your Next Job.”

USA Today Network via The Arizona Republic – Sept. 5 – Op-ed by Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design Gerald Suarez covers ‘Tips for the Process of Changing Jobs.’ 

Poets & Quants – Sept. 4 – “Best & Brightest Executive MBAs Of 2021” includes testimonials for Maryland Smith profiled honorees by Executive MBA Program Academic Director Rob Sheehan for Jessica Zeiser and Associate Research Professor Joseph Bailey for Kabir Mulchandani.

TalkMarkets – Sept. 4 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the “Year-To-Date Percentage Returns Of 8 Largest Stocks.”

Psychology Today – Sept./Oct. 2021 – “A Table for One” (print-only, but adapted from the magazine’s blogpost How It Feels to Be Alone in Public) is based on Dean’s Professor of Marketing Rebecca Ratner’s “Inhibited from Bowling Alone” study. … Related: “How to Enjoy Being Single,” via Psyche, includes: In one memorable study, [Rebecca Ratner] recruited 86 participants from a university campus and invited them to attend an exhibition at an art gallery. Some were alone, others were in pairs with an existing acquaintance. Before they saw the exhibition, they were asked to estimate how much they would enjoy the experience – and, after they’d had a look around, they had to rate their actual enjoyment. ... The lone participants tended to envision a dim view of the experience without a partner. Yet Ratner and [co-author Rebecca] Hamilton found that the presence of a companion made no difference to their overall enjoyment. Importantly, the experience seemed to reduce their feelings of self-consciousness. After visiting the exhibition by themselves, the lone participants were less likely to assume that others had formed a negative judgment, as compared with their fears before the experience.

Tech Xplore – Sept. 4 – Associate Professor of Human Resource Management and Organizational Behavior Cynthia Kay Stevens explains “Employer Pitfalls of the TikTok Resume Trend.”

Inside Higher Ed – Sept. 2 – “The Grass May Be Greener for Women in Industry” quotes Rudolph Lamone Chair of Strategy and Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal and overviews her Nature-published research, ‘Trends in gender pay gaps,’ co-authored with Associate Professor of Strategy and Innovation Waverly Ding.

FIND MBA – Sept. 2 – Assistant Dean for Part-time MBA and Online Programs Paulo Prochno comments in “Competition for a Place in the Next Academic Year is Heating up for Prospective Students”: “The online mode of delivery reduces some of the opportunity costs of pursuing an MBA,” [says Prochno]. “The year of the pandemic was an exception, as many people thought it was a good moment to pursue an MBA, given the uncertainties in the work environment. But now that most companies are hiring again, the need to get an MBA is still there.” So he expects the boost in applications to continue on into the next academic year. “With the forced move to online work brought [about] by the pandemic, many people who didn’t think that they could perform well in an online setting changed their minds,” says Prochno. At the same time, after more than a year fully online work, many professionals are feeling the need for in-person interactions. “With that, programs that offer more flexibility in shifting from online to in-person [teaching] as needed will be increasingly more attractive,” he adds. … Of course, with an increase in attractiveness comes heightened competition for an Online MBA place. What is his advice for standing out in the application process? “Highlight your skills and professional achievements,” Prochno advises prospective students. “A crucial element in a good MBA program is the exchange among students, so applicants need to show they will bring interesting perspectives to the classroom discussions.”

Fortune – Sept. 1 – Maryland Smith is ranked No. 20 in Fortune Education’s “Best Executive MBA Programs in 2021” and alums Dawn Walton, Alex Attumalil and Sylvia Bugg are featured in “Executive MBAs Helped Launch the Careers of These 10 C-Level Executives.”

WalletHub – Sept. 1 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang previews Labor Day weekend automobile retail in an “Ask the Experts” segment.

August 2021

Associated Press – Aug. 31 – Professor of Marketing Amna Kirmani comments in “Millennial Money: Be ready to work for Labor Day bargains”: Some people padded their savings accounts by staying home during the pandemic. And some set aside the advance payments of the child tax credit they received, [points out Kirmani]. As a result, Labor Day staples like car sales, appliance deals and mattress markdowns might not be a given in 2021 — or, not as impressive. Products in low supply aren’t expected to be discounted much, if at all. That’s the case with some cars, Kirmani predicts. … Comparison shopping on the internet is the best option for finding the lowest price, according to Kirmani. Seek out deal comparison sites and sales roundups that do the homework for you or start monitoring prices yourself before Labor Day so you can judge the value of a sale. … If you want it but could go without for a few months, try holding off until some of the supply chain issues are under control. Black Friday sales — which Kirmani says are historically better than Labor Day — will be coming in November. But it’s difficult to predict what those sales will look like this year.

Minneapolis Star Tribune – Aug. 30 – “Maybe These NDAs Really Protect Only the Bad Employers” references a working paper, Non-Disclosure Agreements and Externalities from Silence, co-authored by Assistant Professor of Management and Organization Evan Starr.

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education – Aug. 26 – Rudolph Lamone Chair of Strategy and Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal expands on her recent study co-authored with faculty colleague Waverly Ding in “Gender Pay Gap Greater in Academia Than Industry Among Non-Tenured Faculty.”

The Economic Times – Aug. 26 – Distinguished University Professor and Special Advisor to the Dean Ritu Agarwal is named to the Advisory Council on Responsible Digital Transformation for the new Centre for Digital Transformation: The centre is an initiative of the Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad and Bank of America “to become a vibrant knowledge hub for academia, policymaking and the private sector by facilitating cutting-edge research on digital transformation and innovation.” … Coverage also by FinTech and Finance News.

Capital.com – Aug. 25 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments in “Thoughtworks Ready for IPO, but Still Searching for a Price”: [Kass] said it’s not uncommon for companies to delay such information prior to an IPO. Examples include Facebook in 2012, and more recently, Robinhood Markets and Snowflake. Kass said the company and its underwriters might not have a grasp on the market prices yet, along the lines of Snowflake’s experience. The night before its IPO, the company estimated its value at $90 per share. The morning before the market opened Wall Street predicted $120 a share. In fact, the price was $240 per share. That price held up, Kass said. Snowflake “had no idea what the market was like,” Kass said. “The underwriters had no feel for it.” … Kass noted that Goldman Sachs and J.P. Morgan are experts at walking through IPOs. But something did catch his eye about the offering. “Apparently this offering isn’t just raising cash for the company but is an opportunity for early investors to cash out.”

LiveHelpNow – Aug. 24 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang comments in “Shopping Cart Abandonment: Prevent It, Manage It, Reduce It.”

Christian Science Monitor – Aug. 23 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch comments in “Dawn of the Electric Vehicle Age? One Car Shopper’s Experience”: In many ways, today is reminiscent of the early days of automobiles, when cars powered by steam, gasoline, and electricity were all vying for supremacy. Vehicles were expensive, so mostly wealthy people were buying them. Back then, the widespread opinion was that gasoline, steam, and electric vehicles would all find their place in the 20th century, [says Kirsch]. “The big surprise was ... only internal combustion really survived past World War I.” … If successful, the incentives could jump-start EV sales. If not, U.S. automakers could be stuck with a big backlog of unsold electric cars. “I’m of two minds. The sort of policy wonk in me says this is just about a managed transition,” But “as a professor of entrepreneurship and someone who thinks a lot about capitalism, our history with managed transformations is pretty poor.”

Lab Manager Magazine – Aug. 23 – “To Be More Creative, Teams Must Feel Free to Show Emotions” overviews research at Organization Science by Associate Professor of Management and Organization Myeong-Gu Seo… Related coverage in B2B News Network’s (Aug. 25) Daily News Roundup (scroll down).

Forbes – Aug. 22 – Associate Professor of Information Systems Jui Ramaprasad comments in “Taliban Takeover Presents New Challenges for Social Media Companies”: “It is still unclear what role platforms like Twitter and Facebook want to take in managing the information that they facilitate the spread of,” [said Ramaprasad] “Though Facebook has instituted the Oversight Board – “The Facebook Supreme Court” – and Twitter has become more active in suspending and even banning accounts, e.g. Donald Trump, a clear policy on what constitutes the criteria for suspension or account locking,” said Ramaprasad. “If Donald Trump was banned for potential for further inciting violence, one would think that the Taliban would be as well. But this is the result of shying away from clear, uniform and consistent policies and implementation of these policies.” … Given those facts, the social media companies may now have to be far more straightforward about what is allowed to be posted on the platforms, and what should be subject to removal. “Indeed, concisely outlining what constitutes a violation of platform policy – e.g., the spreading of ‘conspiracy theories, disinformation, and hate speech’ – is not always straightforward in implementation, it is not sustainable to continue to evaluate these on a case-by-case basis.”

BombBomb Customer Experience Podcast – Aug. 22 – Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust discusses “How Artificial Intelligence is Driving the Feeling Economy.”

Insurance.com – Aug. 19 – Associate Clinical Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss comments in “How Do You Get a Life Insurance Policy for Seniors”: When looking for the best term life insurance make sure to consider whether you would prefer level term or yearly renewable. "Term insurance is useful primarily for income replacement if the insured dies while he or she is working and has a surviving spouse or children who are dependent on that income," [says Kiss]. "This policy is best when there is a specific need, such as retirement debt that needs to be paid off. But it will not pay out if the policyholder dies after the term expires." … Whole life insurance policies are usually easier to get for seniors than term life insurance. "Whole life insurance is primarily useful for avoiding taxes. The ability to accrue and borrow against the cash value has a drawback: The insurance company will deduct the amount outstanding from the death benefit," notes Kiss. … However, final expense life insurance is often no medical exam required life policies. Instead, you may have to answer a few health-related questions to get covered. "Be aware that the cost per $1,000 for this type of policy is very high because there are no medical questions required; therefore, healthier people may pay the same high rates as those who are not as healthy," cautions Kiss.

Nature – Aug. 18 – “Academia, a Promised Land?” by Rudolph Lamone Chair of Strategy and Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal and Associate Professor of Strategy and Innovation Waverly Ding is a “Behind the Paper” series interpretation of their research that reveals a wider gender pay and promotion gap in academia relative to industry among science and engineering doctorate holders.

Daily Maverick (South Africa) – Aug. 18 – Research – “The Feeling Economy: Managing in the Next Generation of AI” -- by Maryland Smith professors Roland Rust and Vojislav Maksimovic is central to “Women Prepare for Their Time to Shine,” a guest piece produced by the University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business to promote its annual Women in Business Conference.

The Times (of London) – Aug. 17 – “Breakthrough Innovation Study Wins $75,000 Prize” announces Associate Professor of Business and Public Policy Rachelle Sampson winning one of the UK’s largest academic prizes – the Panmure House Prize for: …Her proposed research (with a team including Maryland Smith colleague Brent Goldfarb) that looks at U.S. patents between 1980 and 2017. The project aims to demonstrate that long-term-oriented firms – supported by government-funded R&D, stronger scientific orientation, a more centralised organisation and greater investment– are more likely to produce breakthrough innovations such as Dupont’s nylon or AT&T Bell Labs’ transistor.

Nasdaq – Aug 17 – Maryland Smith is cited among seven U.S. schools reporting women comprising 45 percent of incoming MBA enrollment in “Women Enrollees Top Men for First Time at This Elite MBA Program.”

BusinessBecause – Aug. 17 – Assistant Dean and Executive Director of Career Services Neta Moye recommends Amy Edmondson’s “The Fearless Organization” as essential reading in “MBA Reading List: 19 Books To Read Before Your MBA.”

Seeking Alpha – Aug. 16 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass writes “Berkshire Hathaway is Undervalued by 17%.”

The Hill – Aug. 16 – Professor of Finance and former Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy Michael Faulkender writes op-ed “Biden is Dead Wrong About the Trump Tax Cuts, Spending and Debt.”

TalkMarkets – Aug. 15 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass reports “Major Changes To Berkshire Hathaway’s Portfolio During The Second Quarter Of 2021,” plus “Companies That Have Reverse Stock Splits Underperform” (Aug. 14) and “Year-To-Date Percentage Returns Of 8 Largest Stocks” (Aug. 14).

Baltimore Sun Education – August 2021 – Maryland Smith’s AI Leadership for Healthcare certificate program is featured among “Degree and Certificate Programs [that] Drive Health Care.”

Global Association of Risk Professionals – Aug. 13 – A Risk Intelligence column, “What a Difference a Pandemic Makes: Risk Management Is Having Another Moment,” highlights work by Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi to promote governmental risk management: Consider [Rossi], who was Citigroup’s consumer lending division CRO during the 2008 crisis. These days, Rossi is collaborating with faculty colleagues on projects that he characterized as being “at the nexus of climate science and financial risk analytics,” with “applicability” for corporations, official entities like the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and local governments. Additionally, Rossi revealed that he has lately had the chance to flex his risk muscles assisting the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as part of an Office of Management and Budget mandate to federal agencies to incorporate enterprise risk management (ERM) into their decision-making.

01net (Italy) – Aug. 13 - “How Brands can Use Facebook Data for Popularity Tests” overviews research by Assistant Professor of Information and Decision Science Kunpeng Zhang and Associate Dean of Master’s Programs Wendy Moe, whose work yielded a new machine learning algorithm that can scroll through social media posts to understand how consumers perceive specific brands.

Slate – Aug. 12 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch comments extensively in “The Stock Market is Still Weird from GameStop,” including this quote: “GameStop without a billion dollars is just kind of a flailing, languishing mall stock. With [$1B], maybe it’s a total relaunch. Right? A billion dollars is a hundred series A rounds. That’s a lot of pivots, a lot of new bets, a lot of R&D...”

SciTechDaily – Aug. 12 - “Privilege and Politics Influence Vaccine’s Racial Disparity – ‘Structural Inequities Pose a Serious Threat To Progress’” covers Center for Health Information Decision and Systems research co-authored by professors Ritu Agarwal and Gordon Gao… Related coverage at News-Medical.Net: “Socioeconomic Privilege and Political Ideology Correlate to Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Vaccination” and Medical Xpress: “Study Shows Privilege, Politics Influence Vaccine's Racial Disparity.”

Financial Times – Aug. 10 – “The NDA Boom is Bad for Both Employers and Workers” references Assistant Professor of Management and Organization Evan Starr and his research: [‘Bundling Postemployment Restrictive Covenants’] published recently by Natarajan Balasubramanian, Evan Starr and Shotaro Yamaguchi suggests that roughly 57 percent of US workers are covered by NDAs, ranging from 44 per cent in accommodation and food services to 69 per cent in professional services. Tech companies often make visitors sign them at the front desk.

Maryland Today – Aug. 9 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang discusses retail trends indicating “’Relaxed’ as the New ‘Business Casual.’”

China Daily – Aug. 9 - “West's Vaccine Hoarding Harms Poor Countries” references and quotes Research Professor Kislaya Prasad from his recent op-ed at Fortune.

Newswise – Aug. 9 – In a “Myth of the Scholar-Athlete” essay, Robert H. Smith Professor of Information Systems Emeritus Henry C. Lucas discusses implications of SCOTUS earlier this summer siding with college athletes against the NCAA, allowing an increase in education-related compensation.

TalkMarkets – Aug. 7 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives “6 Highlights of Berkshire Hathaway’s Second Quarter Report.” … Also at TalkMarkets, Kass reported the “Year-To-Date Percentage Returns Of 8 Largest Stocks for Aug. 7.”

July 2021

Morningstar – Aug. 5 – “Who Dares Loses: Buffett on Luck, Taxes and a Challenge” revisits Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass’ insights, initially via CNBC, on Warren Buffett’s views on luck and the ‘ovarian lottery’: [Kass] was the first to publish Warren Buffett’s views on luck and the ‘ovarian lottery’ based on notes Kass took when Buffett was speaking at a 2013 graduate student event. Kass recalls: “Warren Buffett has stressed the importance of luck in his life, focusing not only on where he was born but also when. His primary skill of allocation of capital has worked well for him in the United States and in his lifetime. Having the good luck to win the ‘ovarian lottery’ is a major determinant in success in life in general and in business in particular.”

Maryland Today – Aug. 4 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd III describes how the pandemic has forced marketers to be nimble and adjust their promotional campaigns, in “A Fraught Summer Olympics Keeps Marketers on Their Toes.”

The Social Media Monthly – Aug. 3 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan writes an op-ed titled “How Digital Marketing Can Drive Traffic to Stores.”

ValuePenguin – July 31 – “When Can I Deduct Health Insurance Premiums on My Taxes?” includes Accounting Lecturer Samuel Handwerger giving financial and tax planning advice in a Q&A (scroll down).

TalkMarkets – July 31 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the “Year-to-Date Percentage Returns of the 8 Largest Stocks.”

Maryland Today – July 30 – "Privilege, Politics Influence Vaccine's Racial Disparity" reveals how social determinants of health—from home internet access to accessibility of health-care facilities—correlate to racial disparities in COVID-19 vaccination among white and Black populations, according to new research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by Maryland Smith professors Ritu Agarwal, Gordon Gao, Jui Ramaprasad, Smith senior research scientist Michelle Dugas, and Smith doctoral students Gujie Li and Junjie Luo.

InvestorPlace – July 30 – "3 Auto Stocks to Buy as They Transition to Tech-Stock Status" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "Legacy automobile companies such as Ford and General Motors can be valued more like technology companies when they are able to demonstrate that their forthcoming electric vehicles are perceived to be competitive technologically with industry leaders such as Tesla and Nio. Although Ford and General Motors do not have cult-like figures such as Elon Musk running their firms, there is still an opportunity to increase their valuations above current levels."

HousingWire – July 29 – Professor of the Practice in Finance Clifford Rossi writes "Risks of Nonbank Mortgage Sellers and Servicers Revisited" to expand on his previous (July 28) HousingWire op-ed on "Why Ginnie Mae's Proposed Liquidity Standards are Sorely Needed."

TechTarget – July 29 – Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design Gerald Suarez comments in "U.S. Lawmaker Seeks National Four-Day Workweek": The four-day workweek was not gaining much traction in the U.S. until the COVID-19 pandemic "sort of revitalized the conversation," [said Suarez], The pandemic began "to trigger some questions that were suppressed, like, 'Why am I working so hard?'" Suarez said. Many businesses discovered, for example, that they could maintain connectedness, human contact and efficiencies even by working remotely. "We began to look for meaning and fulfillment, and not just jobs," he said... The four-day workweek was a natural extension of the remote work conversation. "In a culture that values overcommitments and overwork, and saturation of emails and business as a badge of honor, we're beginning to say when we detach, when we let go, we experience something more fulfilling," Suarez said.  The tension with the four-day workweek is that firms must maintain the same pay with reduced hours and retain the same level of performance, Suarez said. If you're going to reduce hours, you need to maintain continuity of operations, and that will force you to streamline business processes, he said. Some firms that have tried a four-day workweek have seen a spike in productivity, "at least initially," Suarez said.

B2B News Network – July 28 – 'Psychological Safety at Work' cites research by Dean's Professor of Management Subra Tangirala: Most organizations cannot provide that level of psychological safety. Partly that's because people don't enjoy hurting each other's feelings or taking away the opportunity to save face. Those are the findings of new research by an international team of management academics [composed of Tangirala, Elad N. Sherf, Sofya Isaakyan and Hannes Guenter] "When employees speak up publicly, we see that managers are often threatened by it. Managers have this tendency to react negatively to public voice because they feel that they lose control of the conversation and look inept in front of everyone," said Tangirala. "This can have a very bad effect on organizations because employees who are not part of in-groups of the managers usually only have opportunities to reach the managers in public meetings."

Maryland Today – July 28 – 'Don't Put Your Emotions in a Box at Work' features research newly published in Organization Science by management professor Myeong-Gu Seo.

Barron's – July 24 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass' "Exception to the Rule" commentary is published as part of "Barron's Roundtable: Sizing up the Stocks": To the Editor: The suggestion that stocks are overvalued based on the "Rule of 20," which posits that the sum of inflation and the stock market's price/earnings ratio should add up to 20, and is based on data going back to 1957, omits an examination of interest rates ("By This Key Measure, the Stock Market Is Trading at Dot-Com-Era Levels," Up & Down Wall Street, July 16). The 10-year U.S. Treasury rate averaged 5.75% from 1957 through 2021, and 6.65% through 2007, prior to the Great Recession. However, it currently equals only 1.31%, its lowest level over this 65-year time period. Since interest rates are to asset prices what gravity is to matter, the Rule of 20 cannot be applied to determine if current stock market valuations are excessive.

WalletHub – July 24 – Professor of the Practice in Finance Clifford Rossi and Professor of Marketing Amna Kirmani give consumer advice on credit-building (Rossi) and auto insurance reviews (Kirmani).

Associated Press via ABC News – July 22 – Associate Professor of Logistics Management Philip Evers helps explain Amazon's "key for business" initiative in "Amazon's Mission: Getting a 'Key' to Your Apartment Building," : [Evers said] Amazon's desire to get the device into as many buildings as possible may be a way to keep competitors out. "The landlord may say, 'You know, I'll do this for one company, but maybe we don't want it for every delivery company that's out there'," he said. He added that Amazon could find other uses for the service, like having delivery people pick up returns left in the lobby instead of making shoppers schlep to the post office. Amazon declined to share any future plans.

International Business Times – July 22 – Op-ed co-authored by management and entrepreneurship professors David Kirsch and Brent Goldfarb addresses "What Bitcoin's Link With Tesla Means For Public Trust In Our Financial Markets."

Wall Street Journal – July 21 – Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr comments in "The Noncompete Clause gets a Closer Look": Around 32% of U.S. companies include the clauses in all of their employment contracts regardless of position or pay, according to a survey… Use of noncompete clauses surged partly because templates can be found easily online and pasted into contracts, [said Starr, one of the authors of the survey]. … Even in states where the clauses would be voided by courts, companies still add them because they expect few employees to challenge, Mr. Starr said. He added that he has seen a noncompete clause for a volunteer role at a nonprofit organization in California. "If you ban noncompetes for some or all workers, there needs to be some way to incentivize firms to comply," he said. … Mr. Starr sees places for compromise. "The uncontroversial parts are that low-wage workers should by and large not be bound by noncompete agreements, and that you shouldn't be able to surprise a worker with a noncompete on day one of a new job," he said. The FTC could also look at limiting the duration of noncompete clauses, many of which require former employees to sit out of the labor market in their field for two years or more, or at limiting their geographic scope, he and other experts said. … The increase in remote work complicates the question even further. "Setting a federal benchmark can go a long way toward mitigating some uncertainty for firms and workers," Mr. Starr said.

Lab Manager Magazine – July 20 – "Have Something to say? Your Boss Wants You to do it in Private" overviews research by Dean's Professor of Management Subra Tangirala.

Bloomberg Radio – July 17 – Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr discusses President Biden's call the FTC to ban or limit employee noncompetes (starting at 6:57) in the second part of a Bloomberg Law podcast titled "Elon Musk Stars in His Own Courtroom Drama."

Fair Play Talks – July 17 - "Empathetic Leadership Crucial for Employee Wellbeing, Say Experts" extensively quotes Professor of the Practice Gerald Suarez.

Washington Post – July 14 – 'Fact Checker: Biden Bungles Story About Low-Wage Noncompete Agreements' quotes Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr: In the EPI survey, of the 65 construction firms that replied, 30.7% said all employees were subject to noncompete agreements. "With the widespread use of noncompetes we found in construction, Biden's example seems quite plausible to me," Colvin said. [Starr at the Robert H. Smith School of Business] also said the asphalt example did not seem surprising: "Certainly noncompete clauses can and do include geographic restrictions broader than the state." The White House official did not provide a specific example to back up Biden's statement but noted that the EPI study found noncompete agreements remain prevalent in a host of blue-collar jobs.

Journal of Accountancy – July 13 – EY Alumni Professor of Managerial Accounting and Information Assurance Lawrence Gordon contributes to "Fit Cybersecurity Into Your Accounting Courses": Tell students why cybersecurity matters. Some accounting students may wonder why they need to learn about cybersecurity, viewing it as solely a matter for IT. So discuss the "why and how" with students. "The most important tip would be to get your students to understand how, as an information system, accounting relies on cybersecurity, as do all information systems," [said Gordon]. Explain how cybersecurity is a vital component of internal controls, and how disclosure issues and decisions must be addressed. "What's the cost of a cybersecurity breach? That's an accounting issue," he said, as an example. ... Vary the assignments. Accounting faculty can offer a mix of assignments for students around the topic of cybersecurity. Gordon provides students with "problems and little scenarios" and asks them probing questions, such as "How much should a firm invest in cybersecurity?" and "What's the impact of COVID-19 on cybersecurity?" He also asks students to read articles online that explain topics such as how to do a penetration test, a way of testing a computer network or application to find security holes.

The Swaddle – July 12 – "Experiencing Rude Behavior Reduces Our Critical Thinking Skills, Study Shows" quotes Assistant Professor of Management Trevor Foulk and cites his research: The application of anchoring bias is most commonly observed in medical cases — a theory researchers were able to prove in the present study. "If you go into the doctor and say 'I think I'm having a heart attack,' that can become an anchor and the doctor may get fixated on that diagnosis, even if you're just having indigestion," [Foulk explained]. "If doctors don't move off anchors enough, they'll start treating the wrong thing." In the present study … residents at a hospital were given an incorrect suggestion before they had to diagnose a patient, and before the simulation, they had one doctor behave rudely towards the residents. The result was that the residents kept treating the "anchor" suggestion despite new discoveries. "Basically, what we're observing is a narrowing effect. Rudeness narrows your perspective, and that narrowed perspective makes anchoring more likely." … The culture of rude and uncivil behavior is rampant in any job setting, and the present findings aim to take stock of the damage negative attitudes can cause. "In important domains, where people are making critical decisions, we really need to rethink the way we treat people," Foulk said. "We hear 'If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.' It's almost like being able to tolerate people's treatment of you is like a badge of honor. But the reality is that this bad treatment is having really deleterious effects on performance in domains that we care about — like medicine. It matters."

Agility PR Solutions – July 12 – "Social Media Science: How Brands Can Use Facebook to Figure out if People Like Them" overviews research by Assistant Professor of Information and Decision Science Kunpeng Zhang and Associate Dean of Master's Programs Wendy Moe.

Idaho Statesman via Yahoo News – July 11 – "Albertsons Ignored Safety Issues Before Fiery I-84 Crash that Killed Airmen, Families Say" quotes Thomas Corsi, academic director of the MS Supply Chain Program: "Albertsons did not come close to meeting the industry standard of care applicable to it and violated its own policies in both selecting Krujex Freight Transport Co. and the continued use of that carrier's services to deliver product to Albertsons stores through the date of the fatal crash on June 16, 2018, and thereafter," [Corsi] wrote in a court document. … Corsi, who has served as a professor at the Maryland university since 1976, wrote that Albertsons should have never hired Krujex, which had a poor safety record. And the trucking company should have passed on hiring Tsar. … "I have concluded, based on my background and experience, that a cause of the subject crash was the KFTC driver's failure to respond to the slow-moving traffic queue ahead, most likely due to performance decrements associated with fatigue," Corsi wrote. … Corsi said Krujex and Albertsons, which operates its own fleet of 250 trucks, bore "direct responsibility" for the crash. The grocer, he said, had an "unquestioned responsibility" to assess Krujex's ability to safely transport its products.

Maryland Daily Record – July 10 – Associate Professor of Marketing Yogesh Joshi comments in "A New McCormick Product Sold Out in Under an Hour – Again": [Joshi] said that partnerships between influencers and brands can be powerful marketing tools for two reasons. Not only are the influencers able to drum up excitement around the product, but they are also able to help companies develop products that they know will be popular among their colleagues and fans. "Finding the right person is quite important because when you have the right person, the input you get for the product you're trying to make is very relevant," he said. "Not only have you engaged the influencer, but you've also created a product that's of a higher quality. It kind of works hand in hand."Even if it wasn't the company's plan, limited runs of items can be strong marketing tools, Joshi said. Common with products like Nike sneakers, a limited-edition product (especially one that sells out as quickly as this seasoning did) can lead to a lot of buzz and conversation that will still benefit the company even when the product is no longer limited. "Scarcity is a fairly popular tactic that brands sometimes use to launch and promote new products," he said. "If there are many people who are interested, it creates demand and conversation around it, and a lot of that stays around."

NPR – July 9 – 'Biden Moves to Restrict Noncompete Agreements' quotes Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr: Even in states that ban noncompetes, companies have continued to include them in employment contracts, an issue that [Starr] hopes the FTC will address. … "I think the focus should be on trying to deter their use in the first place," says Starr, instead of just making them unenforceable. … In his research, Starr has found that many workers are unaware of state laws prohibiting noncompetes, so when faced with threatening letters from their employers they are unlikely to put up a challenge. Unlike Beck, Starr anticipates the FTC will issue a ban on noncompetes covering most workers. He says banning them for low-wage workers is largely uncontroversial, and there is growing evidence that a ban would benefit high-skilled workers as well.

NPR – July 9 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd discusses "Name, Image, Likeness and College Athlete" in a panel discussion hosted by Louisville affiliate WFPL (at 11:15-13:55, 25:15-26:57,45:50-5:10 in the embedded audio file).

TechTarget – July 9 – "Biden Noncompete Agreement Order a Warning for Businesses" quotes Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr: Biden's executive order "signals a broad federal interest in reforming noncompete policies, which is something that we have never seen before," said [Starr], who recently testified on Connecticut's noncompete legislation. … "Noncompetes clearly fall under the purview of the FTC per the Sherman Act, because they are restraints of trade," Starr said. "But for whatever reason, the federal government has not generally regulated noncompetes, leaving it mostly to states. So it will be interesting to see where the FTC goes from here."

Naturopathic News and Review – July 5 – "Being Rude Can Lead to 'Anchoring' in Medical Scenarios" overviews research co-authored by Assistant Professor of Management Trevor Foulk.

Investing.com – July 5 – "Dollar Weakens as Payrolls Result Eases Rate Hike Concerns" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: However, while Friday's jobs report said that nonfarm payrolls grew by a higher-than-expected 850,000 in June, the unemployment rate was also higher than expected and the pace of hourly earnings growth slowed, easing concerns that the central bank would raise interest rates sooner than expected. This report "would probably not convince the Federal Reserve to change its current policy [said Kass]. ... Republished by Yahoo Finance.

Poets & Quants – July 3 – Poets & Quants MBAs to Watch – Class of 2021 features, among new full-time MBA grads worldwide, profiles of Maryland Smith's Maria Herold and Rachel Loya.

TalkMarkets – July 3 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the "Year-To-Date Percentage Returns Of 8 Largest Stocks."

Quartz – July 2 – "A Shipping Container Shortage is Snarling Global Trade" quotes Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya: The shortage of shipping containers is yet another symptom of the havoc the pandemic has wrought on international supply chains. As a result, freight costs are rising, which in turn leads to higher prices for consumer goods."This matters in the near term because the supply issues will have a direct impact on inflation,"[said Acharya].

VentureBeat – July 2 – Findings by information systems professor Kenpung Zhang and Associate Dean of Masters Programs Wendy Moe are reviewed in "Researchers Develop Algorithm to Identify Well-Liked Brands."

The Social Media Monthly – July 2 – Associate Professor of Information Systems Jui Ramaprasad's op-ed addresses "How Do We Stop Social Media Ads That Target Teens and Minors."

ValueWalk via FinTechZoom – July 2 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass' blogpost "Charlie Munger Loves Zoom" is republished.

E&E News – July 1 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments in "Condo Collapse Could Stoke Miami Climate Fear in Homebuyers": So how might the Champlain Towers South disaster shake things up even more? [Rossi said] there are several short- and long-term possibilities. He said the collapse — regardless of its cause — could "dampen interest" in South Florida properties similar to the 12-story Champlain Towers South… The condominium disaster in Surfside, Fla., "will certainly have buyers [who are] interested in buying into the condo market down there — and other Florida cities, for that matter, that are located close to the shore — to think twice about purchasing a property," said Rossi, who also previously worked as Citigroup Inc.'s chief risk officer."And that could have somewhat of a chilling effect even in a pretty hot market like it is [in Florida] today and in many places around the country," Rossi added. … (Growing awareness of sea-level rise, in addition to"hyper-salient events" such as major hurricanes or the Surfside collapse… can lead to a diminishing of the premium that people are willing to pay for coastal living) … Rossi echoed that point. If the investigation shows the building collapsed solely due to construction or maintenance errors, there may not be any long-term implications for the local market. But it would be different if the investigation provides"incontrovertible evidence" of contributing environmental factors common to the entire region, Rossi said."That could be a catalyst for more people rethinking retiring down in areas like that and saying it's not worth the potential risk out there that we face — to be situated that close to the shore."

June 2021

OZY – June 30 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd comments in "The Ground Shifts Under College Sports": (The University Athletic Association of the Philippines is an international facsimile of the NCAA — boasting a strong college sports system yet without any rules governing payments or compensation.) Shouldn't the home of capitalism and the free market follow the Filipino way? The current model is"not in keeping with market forces," [Boyd tells OZY]."If you have the talent, you should be able to work with people to be compensated."

U.S. House Committee on Financial Services News – June 30 – "Hybrid Hearing – Addressing Climate as a Systemic Risk: The Need to Build Resilience within Our Banking and Financial System" includes testimony from Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi (beginning at 39:30 in embedded video).

Quartz – June 29 – Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr contributes to "An Airport Executive Warns its Concessionaires Not to Steal one Another's Employees": If both airport eateries were independent franchises under the same parent company, then"it's kind of a legal gray area,"[says Starr]. Quartz reached out to Star Concessions to clarify if the company owns both eateries but did not hear back at the time of publication.… A no-poach policy could hurt employee's mobility and hurt any wage gains. The workers are also not aware of no-poach agreements, says Starr. If you submit an application to the stall next door, and the application asks for your private employment—that information could get you kicked out of the applicant pool if a Sbarro had an agreement with Auntie Anne's not to hire from each other, he says.

Bloomberg Law – June 29 – Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr comments in "Employee Noncompete Clause Limits Adopted by Three More States": States also are beginning to enact provisions allowing for civil penalties against companies that use illegal or abusive noncompete contracts, and in some cases making it easier for workers to win attorney fees in court cases where employers seek to enforce noncompetes, [said Starr]. The new Illinois legislation allows the state attorney general to pursue enforcement action against employers related to noncompete contracts and potentially win civil penalties. Penalties are a less common feature of state noncompete laws, but the idea could catch on as a way to deter companies from using them in situations where they're illegal or unenforceable, Starr said. His research shows that even in California, where noncompetes are banned and unenforceable under state law, a significant portion of workers are asked to sign them anyway, he added. "No court in California would sanction a noncompete agreement, and yet these agreements have chilling effects on workers," Starr said. "Workers don't want to fight out a lawsuit," and in many cases might not know state law makes the contracts unenforceable.

Supply Chain Brain – June 26 – Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya discusses implications of a U.S. oversupply of COVID vaccine in "What to do About the Vaccine Surplus."

TalkMarkets – June 26 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the "Year-To-Date Percentage Returns Of 8 Largest Stocks."

ESPN's The Undefeated – June 25 – "The Low-Key Cool of 'Jake, From State Farm' Has Actor Kevin Miles Superstarring" quotes Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd: "Jake is like the guy next door, the boy next door that grew up," [said Boyd] "The perception is there that, man, you went out of your way, Jake. You gave me the inside deal." Insurance can be dull, and it can take antics and hyperbole to stand out. But Boyd calls Jake's charisma, charm and conventional good looks something that can win for State Farm. "He's become a franchise success," said Boyd. That success marks a universal, all-American appeal. But don't misunderstand. Without the slightest patina of performative ethnicity, he still feels authentically Black.

Maryland Today – June 25 – Associate Clinical Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss gives consumer finance advice in "A Hot Housing Market Calls for Cleaning Out Your Closets or Your Bank Account."

InvestorPlace – June 24 – 'Overlooked Blue Chip Stocks for Eagle-Eye Investors' quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "So far in 2021, blue-chip stocks have outperformed high-risk high-return investments. As of June 5, 2021, the Dow Jones Industrial Average, which consists of 30 large blue-chip companies, has increased by 13.6%, while the Nasdaq (made of more high-risk, high-return stocks) has risen by only 7.2%. The S&P 500, which is heavily weighted by the large blue-chip stocks, is up by 12.6%. This relative relationship is likely to persist throughout the balance of the year… Interest rates are likely to be stable or increase slightly in the second half of 2021. Any increase in interest rates should result in high-risk, high-return stocks further underperforming blue-chip stocks since future cash flows of high-risk companies will be discounted at a higher rate resulting in lower valuations relative to blue-chip companies that have more reliable income streams over the near term." … Also at Business Insider's Markets Insider.

Poets & Quants – June 23 – "5 Biggest Surprises Of Online MBA Programs" quotes Maryland Smith online MBA graduate Jose DeJesus: "In a traditional classroom, you have very little visibility into your classmates' lives," [adds DeJesus]. "With an online program, you see people taking class from hotel rooms, trains, at home, and in offices. There is something powerful in seeing how everyone "grinds" it out through the program. Everyone is facing different pressures but still looking to learn and better themselves. There is nothing more motivating than that."

Maryland Today – June 23 – "Returning a Favor via Social Media Could Drive Healthier Habits, UMD Research Shows" overviews research from the Center for Health Information and Decisions Systems by Senior Associate Dean Ritu Agarwal and Professor Gordon Gao.

Bloomberg – June 23 – "Warren Buffett Steps Away From Middleman Spot in Gates Divorce" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "Buffett maybe wants to steer clear of the personal conflict between Bill and Melinda Gates and keep his own personal relationships with both of them separate from this decision," [said Kass]. Still, the investor's statement Wednesday signaled continued support for the foundation, and some Buffett family foundations, with $4.1 billion in donations. "He's sending the very positive signal that he's certainly maintaining his very generous contributions," Kass said.

Baltimore Sun – June 22 – Marketing professors Jie Zhang and P.K. Kannan comment on the post-pandemic business-attire market in "Baltimore-Area Women Come Face-to-Face with an Old Foe After a Year of Pandemic: The Underwire Bra."

The Mortgage Reports – June 21 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi weighs in to "Late-2021 Mortgage Rate Predictions: How High Will Rates Go?": 30-year mortgage rates by late 2021: 3.6% (and) 15-year mortgage rates by late 2021: 2.6%... "These projections are based largely on what happens to the yield curve between now and the end of the year," explains Rossi, "which is likely to steepen a bit more as fixed-income markets build inflationary expectations into their views. "The Fed has signaled a commitment, at least for the time being, to keep short-term rates very low, so we could see a steeper yield curve ahead — which will affect the direction and level of mortgage rates."

FocusTechnica – June 21 – "When Employees Lack Power at Work, They Get Paranoid – And Aggressive" overviews research by Assistant Professor of Management and Organization Trevor Foulk.

Global Association of Risk Professionals (GARP) News – June 19 – "Swans, Rhinos and Elephants Are Animating Risk Debates" quotes Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi: Risk awareness, informed by an integrated view of risks, "is incredibly important and is a function of the type of event that may have occurred at an earlier time (e.g., South Korean MERS epidemic of 2015), and also what I refer to as risk sensitivity," [says Rossi]. "Risk sensitivity is in turn dependent upon a set of management cognitive biases and the level of risk aversion of management – the point being that management teams that exhibit greater degrees of risk aversion and less bias (e.g., herd mentality, recency bias, etc.) wind up being more sensitive to risk events and risk-taking than other managers, which heightens their risk awareness to uncertain events. "We still tend to be far more siloed in assessing risk than we should be," Rossi continues, "and as we learned from the global financial crisis, we often find risks collide with one another. For example, subprime mortgage credit losses contributed to a liquidity crisis and to massive reputation risk, legal, regulatory and market risks during that period."

Maryland Daily Record - June 18 – Clinical Professor Oliver Schlake comments in "140 Years Later, Otterbein's Ovens Are Still Baking Away": The longevity of a family-owned business such as Otterbein's can be a rarity in the United States. … [Schlake said] there are several factors that could inhibit the growth of family-owned business in the U.S.Schlake's family has owned a bakery in Germany for at least 75 years, but he said family businesses can struggle to survive in the U.S. He attributed this to a number of reasons, including the hesitancy among some business owners to be open to organic growth, which is growth by increasing output and enhancing sales from within. For a family-owned business to have success in the U.S., Schlake said it is important to uphold traditions and "have an active, symbiotic relationship with the community." "You expect people to pay a premium because you're selling them something that is more satisfying than just getting food," Schlake said. "It's not just calories … you're eating an experience, you're eating into a tradition." At the same time, Schlake said relying too much on tradition can be "a very dangerous trap" for family-owned businesses. It is important to strike the balance between upholding traditions and evolving.

The Big Think – June 18 – "Don't be Rude to Your Doctor" overviews research by Assistant Professor of Management Trevor Foulk.

ValueWalk – June 17 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives insights in "21 for 2021: Midyear Stocks to Watch."

STAT News - June 17 – "Gender Bias Toward Men in Patent Awards Results in Less Biomedical Innovation for Women" quotes Associate Professor of Management Waverly Ding and references her research: Thinking more broadly this way about the implications of a lack of female patent holders may still be relatively new. Waverly Ding, who studies gender issues related to entrepreneurship and science and author of a 2006 Science study showing the gender gap in patenting, pointed out that people haven't really thought about the consequences of her findings on society at large. "If we have a more diverse innovation workforce, then we're going to have better results in terms of the quality and the type of patents we're getting," Ding said, adding, "But we have never really looked into this assumption, and no one had tried to quantify what it means to have women's representation." … None of the female researchers STAT spoke to were surprised at the study's findings. "Women bring their unique perspectives, their interests, their preferences," said Ding.

ABS News and Research – June 16 - "Apple Stock Split: History, Reasons & Brief Analysis," quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Kass argues that stock splitting was a practice used by companies to keep their stock prices in the mid-double-digit range. Moreover, companies did this as often as possible because broker commissions were fixed, and investors preferred trading in "round lots" of 100 shares. In contrast, if an investor purchased less than 100 shares, broker commissions were amplified, the reason behind holding "round lots."

US News & World Report - June 14 – "What Are Congress Members Trading?" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: [Kass says], "Since members of Congress do have access to inside information such as the outlook for the overall economy, specific industries, and individual companies, large transactions on either the buy side or the sell side might serve as a useful signal as to major changes that could be forthcoming that could affect the securities involved." … Related: Kass, via TalkMarkets, gives "The Year-to-Date Percentage Returns of the 8 Largest Stocks" (June 12).

Poets & Quants – June 12 – "Best and Brightest Online MBAs: Class of 2021" profiles Maryland Smith's Yenny Andrade Castillo and Jose DeJesus, with the overview including: At the same time, the University of Maryland's& Yenny Andrade Castillo has spent nearly a decade at the World Bank. "Working for the World Bank has been a rewarding experience. I've traveled on missions to the Philippines, Malaysia and South Africa, and I've seen the developmental impact of the World Bank's work in helping poor people," she writes. "At the same time, I've progressed in my professional career, advancing from an assistant position to associate portfolio officer in the Private Equity Funds unit at IFC."

StudyFinds ("Research in a Nutshell") – June 11 – "Rudeness can Lead to Serious Mistakes in Life-or-Death Situations" covers "Trapped by A First Hypothesis: How Rudeness Leads to Anchoring," co-authored by management professor Trevor Foulk and forthcoming in the Journal of Applied Psychology… Related coverage includes posts at News-Medical.net, Scienmag, Medical Xpress and a recent at Hidden Brain: …Turns out, rude experiences can trigger the anchoring bias – our tendency to focus on one piece of information when making a decision, even if the information is irrelevant. After experiencing rudeness, doctors and medical residents were more likely to anchor to an incorrect diagnosis, for example. Rudeness made it harder to think clearly and make good decisions. "Rudeness narrows your perspective, and that narrowed perspective makes anchoring more likely," said Trevor Foulk, one of the study's authors. "We really need to rethink the way we treat people." It can't hurt to ask: What can I do to be a little bit kinder today?

Southern Maryland Chronicle – June 10 – "Cars are About to Cost a lot More in Maryland After the Pandemic" quotes Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya: Chip shortage, [according to Acharya], left most of the auto manufacturers hungry for even the basic components of their cars or trucks… Most cars nowadays have capabilities like artificial intelligence. They can parallel park the vehicle, keep you within the lane, protect your bumper to get harmed in case of a potential collision by avoiding the same and help you keep focused on the road by barring all sorts of distractions. With these cars, you also get some mind-blowing entertainment options, infotainment systems, and internet connectivity. According to the professor, we are nowadays driving "smart devices on wheels."

Supply Chain Masters (Belgium) – June 9 – "Research: Why Managers Ignore Employees' Ideas," co-authored by management professors Subra Tangirala and Vijaya Venkataramani, is republished from Harvard Business Review.

WalletHub – June 9 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang answers "What's the Deal with Credit Card Deals?"

Financial Post – June 8 – Management professor Trevor Foulk discusses his recent workplace behavior research in "Forget Everything You Thought You Knew About Power."

Yahoo Finance – June 8 – "10 Best Stocks to Buy According to Warren Buffett" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Last year, Buffett sold huge stakes in bank stocks, including JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE: JPM), The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. (NYSE: PNC) and Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) amid financial volatility caused by the coronavirus crisis. This move was the result of, in the words of a finance professor David Kass at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business, "extreme caution" practiced by Buffett as bank stocks are prone to losses and vulnerability during difficult times such as the one heralded by the pandemic.

Science Newsnet – June 8 – "Eye Tracking Study Shows How Online Ads Help Consumers Shop Faster" covers a recent study co-authored by Distinguished University Professor and PepsiCo Chair in Consumer Science Michel Wedel.

TalkMarkets – June 5 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the "Year-to-Date Percentage Returns of the 8 Largest Stocks."

Maryland Daily Record – June 3 – "UMD Honors Five Exporting Businesses for Resilience During COVID-19" reviews the same-day Maryland Business Adapts event organized by Center for Global Business and quotes CGB Executive Director Rebecca Bellinger: "While each company's pivots were assessed on their own merits against an award rubric, we were quite pleased that the five companies ultimately chosen were diverse in ownership, business model, industry and adaptive strategies."

dot.LA – June 2 – "Quincy Jones' New NFT Platform Wants to Take the Guilt Out of Artist NFTs" quotes Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch: [Kirsch said] it's unclear if OneOf's platform can pull in enough users to make it work. "What's really going to matter is if people want these tokens or not," he said. "Are people interested? Are there superfans for whom access to an NFT of one of their artists whom they follow is worth paying money for? That's what's going to make or break this in my view."

Valor Economico (Brazil) – June 1 – "Giving Employees a Voice in Changing Scenarios Increases Resilience, Says Study" quotes Dean's Professor of Management Subra Tangirala and summarizes his research: In experiments they did with some teams, they asked managers to encourage people to express themselves; to create spaces where they were heard; to recognize or reward the speaker. When the three actions took place, the researchers stated that the performance was higher, compared to that obtained by the teams that did not undergo this intervention. "Not only to prevent productivity, after the shock of change, from falling even further, but also to recover more quickly," [said Tangirala].

May 2021

Wall Street Journal – May 29 – "Paycheck Protection Program Closes to New Applications" references Professor of Finance Michael Faulkender and his recent study: A December study by Michael Faulkender, who was assistant secretary for economic policy at the Treasury Department during the Trump administration and worked closely with the SBA to administer the PPP, said the program saved 18.6 million jobs. Mr. Faulkender and co-authors based their estimate on an analysis of county-level unemployment-insurance claims. Mr. Faulkender said that as the nation entered a sudden economic crisis last year, the SBA and Treasury had to balance getting money to businesses quickly with fraud-prevention measures…

GARP (Global Association of Risk Professionals) – May 29 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments in "The Archegos Collapse: Not Just a Family Office Affair: A nonbank fund's failure exposes a risk and regulatory blind spot": "Counterparty Risk Management 101 should have been happening," [said Rossi] Banks should have been able to answer the basic questions, he continued: "Who are your counterparties, and how do you ensure you have appropriately assessed their risks?" … Archegos was "regularly putting up $15 of collateral to borrow $85." That alone should have been a red flag, Rossi argued. He believes that anyone "borrowing from a regulated financial institution should have some oversight."

BusinessBecause – May 29 – BusinessBecause Online MBA Guide 2021 quotes Assistant Dean for Part-time MBA and Online Programs Paulo Prochno and Career Center assistant director Julie Neill: (Prochno): "An online program covers traditional MBA ground that prepares students to take more senior management roles, giving them a view on how the different functions contribute to the overall results of a company. This requires both hard and soft skills. The latter can be developed through lively synchronous sessions that include virtual breakout rooms for small group discussions through which students exercise such skills as emotional intelligence and collaborative problem-solving" (Page 20) … (Neill): " An online MBA has the added advantage of preparing leaders to collaborate with a diverse group of peers in a virtual environment, a skillset that will undoubtedly become increasingly important in the future of work." (Page 17).

InvestorPlace – May 28 – "Money Moves for Recent Grads: Top Finance Tips for Recent Graduates" quotes Clinical Associate Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss: If you're anything like me, figuring out your budget probably feels a bit like guessing how many jellybeans are in a jar. But as [Kiss told InvestorPlace], it might not be fun, but "it is important to start and stick to a budget." She went on to say: "You can download a personal finance app on your phone (e.g., Mint.com) to track your spending and account balances. You need to understand your living expenses from utilities to rent to transportation; you will face some monthly expenses that previously were negligible or nonexistent. This will be a large portion of your monthly budget." … Related: Wealth Creation Investing quotes Kiss in "Retirement Funds For Rookies: Everything New Grads Need To Know" (May 26).

Times of News – May 28 – Associate Professor of Management David Waguespack explains "Implications of Dwindling Oscars Viewership and Movie Audience Fragmentation."

American Marketing Association – May 27 – "When to Release Free and Paid Apps for Maximal Revenue" overviews research co-authored by marketing professors Jie Zhang and Michel Wedel and Maryland Smith PhD graduate Seoungwoo Lee.

Haptic – May 27 – "Feeling Intelligence will be Dominant in the Economy" by Europe-based Haptic R&D Consulting overviews the book, The Feeling Economy: How Artificial Intelligence Is Creating the Era of Empathy, co-authored by Distinguished University Professor David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust.

Harvard Business Review – May 26 – Associate Professor of Management David Waguespack co-authors "Dispersed Teams Succeed Fast, Fail Slow."

Science Newsnet – May 26 – "Why Italy's Economy Stopped Growing" explores an NBR working paper co-authored by Assistant Professor of Finance Bruno Pellegrino. … Related coverage by NbaRevolution (Italy).

MarketScale – May 26 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan discusses 'store within a store' strategy for large retailers, via a video embedded in a reposting of "Walmart Closing Most In-Store McDonald's."

CNBC – May 25 – Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Anil K. Gupta is cited for helping select the 2021 CNBC Disruptor 50 list.

Science Newsnet – May 25 – Accounting Lecturer Samuel Handwerger explains "The 280E Tax Code as an Obstacle for Cannabis Firms and the SAFE Banking Act." … Related coverage at Financial Daily Newswire.

CBS News (online) – May 24 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch comments extensively through "Should You Invest in Dogecoin? Expert Suggests Keeping Away from Controversial Cryptocurrency Market."

Business Insider – May 24 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments in 'Warren Buffett Built a $4 Billion Chevron Stake in 6 Months — Then Halved it Last Quarter': Berkshire may also have cut its Chevron position because it wanted to take some profits off the table, [Kass told Insider]. "Buffett may have decided to realize a 35% profit in a short period of time," Kass said, pointing out that Berkshire spent an average of $83 per Chevron share, and the company's stock price surged as high as $112 last quarter. The Berkshire chief may also have determined that oil prices were more likely to fall than rise in the coming months, weakening the near-term outlook for Chevron stock, Kass added… Berkshire slashed other bank holdings, and eliminated its JPMorgan and Goldman Sachs stakes entirely last year. Those disposals might indicate that Buffett is bracing for a wave of defaults, Kass said. The investor may have plowed over $2 billion into Bank of America stock over 12 days last fall because he considered the lender to be less risky than its peers, he added. "Buffett's exit from GS, JPM, and WFC is perhaps a reflection of his fear of very bad outcomes from the pandemic with numerous defaults on bank loans, especially commercial loans," Kass said. "Bank of America has less exposure to commercial loans than JPM and WFC." … Additional coverage of David Kass: 'Year-To-Date Percentage Returns of 8 Largest Stocks' (May 22), via TalkMarkets.

American University Law Review – May 22 – Assistant Professor of Information Systems Lauren Rhue co-authors "Tracing the Invisible: Information Fiduciaries and the Pandemic" as a call for "for more robust solutions to protect individuals' privacy—whether those individuals are currently visible or invisible to pandemic technology—if pandemic technology is to provide the universal coverage necessary for a public health emergency, such as the COVID-19 pandemic."

Maryland Matters – May 22 – "TikTok and Google Docs: Small Businesses Thrive After Adapting to the Pandemic" quotes Distinguished University Professor David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust: The pandemic sped up the online shopping trend that existed prior, [said Rust]. "We are in an environment where a substantial percentage of the buying is going to happen online and that is probably always going to be true," Rust said. … Ninety percent of consumers will buy products from a brand they follow on social media, found a 2020 study by software company, Sprout Social Inc. Any smart business goes where the people are and, during the pandemic, they weren't walking down the street, Rust said.

American Banker – May 21 – "What Could be in Store for Banks after Biden Climate Change Order" quotes Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi: But despite the executive order, regulators are likely to continue moving carefully on climate change until they get their arms around current climate models and how they can measure bank exposure, [said Rossi] "You can make some terrible economic decisions based on this," said Rossi, a former senior risk executive at Citigroup, who is studying the effects of climate change on housing. "We have to understand what's going on first with the climate models we use before making assessments."

ValueWalk – May 21 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass explains why 'SPACS Have Fallen from Favor.'

Baltimore Sun – May 18 – Professor of Finance Michael Faulkender writes "As the U.S. Returns to Normal, so Must the Federal Reserve."

Quirk's Media – May 18 – "How a Zero-Sum Mindset Can Undermine Workplace Negotiations" overviews Associate Professor of Management Rellie Derfler-Rozin research on the impact of zero-sum thinking in the employment negotiation process… Related coverage in Communications of the ACM's "Myths About Workplace Negotiations."

Bloomberg Opinion – May 16 – 'Meritocracy Is the Key to Boosting Economic Growth' highlights research by Assistant Professor of Finance Bruno Pellegrino: [Pellegrino shows] that countries with high meritocracy scores have enjoyed much more of a bonus from new technology than countries with low scores such as Italy. Italy's loyalty-based management style had no negative consequences for productivity growth in the decades before 1995. But when the IT revolution took off, loyalty-based management reduced Italy's productivity growth by between 13 and 16 percentage points. This result suggests that the meritocracy dividend is growing along with the IT revolution: Meritocracy is not just the secret sauce of economic growth in the long term, but also a secret sauce that is becoming ever more potent.

Salon – May 16 – A 'Quest for Perfect Parenting' piece sourced from multiple studies and PhDs quotes Associate Clinical Professor of Management Nicole Coomber: Lack of feedback is also an issue, [says Coomber]... "In terms of parenting, what kind of job has less clarity on deliverables and goals and less feedback, right?" she asks. "When you put people in a job that is completely amorphous, and they don't know if they're doing a good job or a bad job, that is a recipe for perfectionistic tendencies."

MarketScale – May 15 – "Walmart to Close Most In-Store McDonald's By End Of Summer" quotes Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan: "If you look at it from the viewpoint of McDonald's," Kannan said, "During the COVID pandemic, 70 percent of their sales came from drive-throughs, and even as they are looking forward when Walmart is changing their store formats … McDonald's is facing a challenge because they must also upgrade with these new stores."

TalkMarkets – May 15 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the "Year-to-Date Percentage Returns of the 8 Largest Stocks."

Phys.org – May 13 – "Research Reveals Negative Effects of Hotel App Adoption on Customer Spending" features a newly published findings by Dean's Chair in Marketing P.K. Kannan in the Journal of Marketing Research.

Science Newsnet – May 13 – "What it Means to Be Green (in the fund management industry)" previews an upcoming webinar co-hosted by Maryland Smith's Center for Financial Policy and Center for Social Value Creation… "Pitfalls of a Zero-Sum Mindset" (May 12) previews a Maryland Smith-hosted webinar delivered by management professor Rellie Derfler-Rozin on her recent research on the impact of zero-sum thinking in the employment negotiation process.

Washington Post – May 12 – "'Help Wanted' Signs Point to Big Summer Travel Problems" quotes Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust: But smaller companies didn't have that luxury (retaining employees by shifting them to other divisions), and now they are paying the price. "With fewer workers, the quality of service in hospitality is likely to be affected in the coming months," [says Rust]. "And there's not much that travelers can do about it."

FIND MBA – May 12 – Director of Online Programs Danielle Wang contributes to "In a Locked-Down World, Online MBAs Create a Sense of Community": [Wang] says that a significant and ongoing challenge for online students is accessing the breadth of resources that are typically available to their counterparts taking on-campus courses. This includes taking advantage of networking events and career-coaching services. Successful online students have common attributes, she says. "Drive to succeed and self-management are particularly important." Also critical are time management skills, given that students complete the majority of their coursework at their own pace. "They need to be constantly vigilant about setting and meeting weekly learning goals, including staying ahead of coursework deadlines," says Wang. She also notes the pandemic has crystalized some of the benefits of remote study, including the ability to adjust to unexpected work demands, job changes or relocations.

American Marketing Association – May 11 – Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust co-authors "How Social Media and AI Enable Companies to Track Brand Reputations in Real Time" as an overview of his newly published study in the Journal of Marketing.

Marketing Directo (Spain) – May 11 – "Advertising and Art Put Eyes on Each Other: Are Brands the Medici of the 21st Century?": quotes Assistant Professor of Marketing Yajin Wang: Still, "the younger generations seem more open when it comes to celebrating success. And they seem to understand that if you want to be a famous artist, you are not going to be famous solely because of your works."

Customer Talk (Netherlands) – May 11 – "Emotional Artificial Intelligence: Still a Long Way to Go" cites research by Assistant Professor of Information Systems Lauren Rhue: Analyzing and categorizing people based on their inner emotions is misguided according to a large group of people. A study [by Rhue] found that emotion recognition technology assigns more negative emotions to people of certain ethnic races and their faces as twice as angry. then stamps other faces. The problem with emotional recognition – aside from the inherent biases – is that human emotions are not limited to facial expressions or voice intonations. When an individual laughs, it does not always mean that he is actually happy.

Maryland Today – May 10 – Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya explains why a pandemic-driven shortage of computer chips means "Cars (are) About to Cost More."

Poets & Quants – May 9 – Associate Dean of Master's Programs Wendy Moe comments on Jasmine Snead and Virginia Pierrie – both selected and profiled (Snead here and Pierre here) for "100 Best & Brightest MBAs: Class of 2021": "…[Pierrie] was a key team member in communicating decisions to the students and providing the administration with feedback on how her classmates were handling the [COVID-prompted] transition [to virtual activities]. Early feedback helped both faculty and staff adjust and provide the best experience possible for our students. In addition, she worked with her fellow MBAA board members and each of the individual clubs to transition their programming online." … [Snead] designed and implemented the first ever "Winternship Challenge" in partnership with the Office of Career Services. This challenge helped motivate her fellow classmates over the winter break in their job search and was so successful that it was held again the following winter… [Snead as] VP of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion has led the MBA Association to host events that educated her classmates as to the effects of systemic racism and what they could do as individuals to change it… She has inspired many in the Smith community to do more for our program and the college to make sure that our commitment to diversity goes beyond the surface and starts to influence how we think about curriculum and the culture of the full-time MBA program.

Sina Finance – May 8 – Clinical Professor of Finance David, in an interview, explains "Buffett's Rejection of the Climate Change Proposal is to Protect the Interests of Individual Shareholders": …Regarding the shareholders proposal for enhanced disclosure of climate change at this meeting, [Kass] believes that Buffett's approach is to protect the interests of shareholders, but such an approach may lose some customers in the long run…

Arirang Korea – May 8 – Research Professor and Center for Global Business Professor Kislaya Prasad discusses 'Global Imbalance in the COVID-19-Vaccine Rollout' (video, at 6:15) as part of the South Korea news channel's weekly Foreign Correspondents program.

TalkMarkets – May 8 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the "Year-to-Date Percentage of 8 Largest Stocks."

Fast Company – May 7 – "Welcome to the Post-Sellout Era" quotes Assistant Professor of Marketing Yajin Wang: It's almost quaint now to recall how Moby was pilloried by fans for selling out when his 1999 album Play became the most licensed of all time. All 18 tracks were featured in a TV show, movie, or commercial, and in some instances all three (nothing says upscale hotel lobby to me more than track three, "Porcelain"). When Honda licensed indie darling Vampire Weekend's "Holiday" for a Civic commercial a decade later, there appeared to be no blowback whatsoever. "Younger generations seem to openly celebrate being successful. There's an understanding that if you want to be a famous artist, it can't just be about your artwork," says [Wang].

eeDesignit – May 6 – "Harnessing AI for a More Equitable Workplace" overviews research by Associate Professor of Management and Statistics Margrét Bjarnadóttir… Related coverage at Tech HR Series.

Forbes – May 5 – Rajshree Agarwal writes op-ed: "Lessons From The 2009 American Recovery And Reinvestment Act For The American Jobs And Infrastructure Plan."

InvestorPlace – May 5 – Dean's Professor of Information Systems Anand Gopal gives insights from his research for 'Gun Stocks Amid Surging Firearm Sales': [Gopal], who recently published the study "Traders, guns, and money: The effects of mass shootings on stock prices of firearm manufacturers in the U.S.," wrote in an email to InvestorPlace, "Stock prices for U.S. firearm manufacturers appear to fluctuate based on two factors — an increase in the probability of firearm regulation and the short-term perception of danger to life and property."… As long as the fear of restrictions hangs over the sector, gun stocks will do well. As Gopal wrote, "This raises the question — are the current prices already factoring in the Biden Administration's intentions and the ongoing crises with the pandemic and unrest on the southern border? My sense is that no, these prices will continue to rise till we hit the next inflexion point — the 2022 midterm elections."

Bloomberg – May 3 – "Abel's 'Extreme Confidence' Seen as Ticket to Following Buffett" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "There's only one Warren Buffett," [Kass] said in a phone interview. "But he brings other strengths to the table," Kass said of Abel. "He exudes extreme competence."... Related coverage quoting Kass includes: Entrepreneur "Warren Buffett Reveals Who Will Be His Successor Once He Leaves" (May 3), (May 3) and Business Insider Meet Greg Abel, the 58-year-old Berkshire Hathaway vice chairman just tapped as Warren Buffett's successor (May 3).

NTD Business – May 3 – Clinical Professor of Business David Kass comments in "Buffett and Munger Talk Earnings, SPACS" (Video – 2-minute mark): Reporter: Berkshire Hathaway, reporting and operating income of $7 billion. That's 20 percent higher than the same period last year. Its assortment of insurance, manufacturing, transportation, retail and utility businesses are generally recovering as the economy reopens. Kass: "Their first-quarter earnings I thought were excellent. It looked like they were firing on all cylinders." … Related: Kass gives "6 Highlights of Berkshire Hathaway's 2021 First Quarter Report," via ValueWalk (May 3) and 'Year-to-Date Percentage Returns of 8 Largest Stocks,' via TalkMarkets (April 1).

Debtwire – May 1 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments in "FHFA gets an earful on climate risk; FHLB, GSE and CRT projected losses near USD 50bn": (newsletter-subscriber access only): Data firms, academics and investors have been busy enhancing and assessing models that in some cases show lenders are woefully underestimating costs associated with natural disaster risks and climate change. Risk officers at large mortgage companies are "scrambling" to understand what those costs will do to profits, some in anticipation of regulatory scrutiny, [said Rossi]. "This is a brave new world for anybody who is credit investing in the space," Rossi said. "Within the last six months, I've seen the interest (in climate risk modeling) shoot up in intensity," with that being closely correlated with the new presidential administration, he added. A common thread through his letter, as was also evident in a study published by Rossi in August 2020, is related to how investors and the government-sponsored enterprises aren't properly accounting for rising climate risks, in light of the storms that have walloped parts of the US in recent years and expectations around increasingly severe weather…

April 2021

Vox – April 30 – "How the US Won the Economic Recovery" (in response to COVID) cites Professor of Finance Michael Faulkender and his supporting data.

Salon – April 30 – Assistant Dean of the Full-time MBA Program Nicole Coomber contributes insight referencing management-faculty colleague Trevor Foulk to "What Women Know About the Science of Perfectionism": In a milder iteration, perfectionistic thinking can make you feel less fulfilled and inspired. [Coomber] pointed to the work of her colleague Trevor Foulk, Ph.D. on "maximizing" which he later explained, "basically means looking for the best, most optimal solution." On the other hand, "satisficing" entails establishing minimum criteria and being cool with anything that fits the bill. Foulk and a colleague found associations between a maximizing mindset and decreased motivation. As Coomber put it, "If you are always seeking the best, most optimal outcome then you actually enjoy work less." That helps explain why self-oriented perfectionism is a risk factor for burnout.

Maryland Today – April 30 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd III explains the rise and collapse of a European soccer Super League in "Why European Soccer Fans Gave Super League a Red Card ."

Quartz – April 28 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments in "Banks Still Aren't Accounting for the Emissions They Finance": Picking winners in the low-carbon economy will not be easy, [said Rossi]. Eliminating obvious culprits like coal-fired power plants is only a first step. Assessing transition risk for a specific investment requires assumptions about the trajectory of the economy and the climate itself, said Rossi. Conventional climate models are ill-suited to the task because they don't yield very accurate insights at the level of geographic granularity or time horizon most relevant to investment planners—what the climate will be like for a specific factory in 10 years, for example. Likewise, the economic models banks can use to translate those climate forecasts into market forecasts—and thus make decisions about transition risk—are loaded with uncertainty about the economic toll of climate impacts and the pace of the clean energy transition. In other words, many financial institutions won't know precisely what to do with the data on portfolio emissions even after they have it. "This is not something they're well-equipped to handle," said Rossi.

Maryland Today – April 28 – "The Ugly Side of Beauty AI" features research-related insights from Assistant Professor of Information Systems Lauren Rhue.

NPR – April 27 – Professor of Finance Michael Faulkender comments in "Did Emergency PPP Loans Work? Nearly $800 Billion Later, We Still Don't Know": Michael Faulkender, who as assistant Treasury secretary for economic policy in the Trump administration helped craft the loan program, argues that it played a much larger role, helping to save more than 18 million jobs during its early months. "I think relative to how devastating things could have been, PPP was extraordinarily successful." … Faulkender argues that without the loan program, even more people would have been dumped into the unemployment system, which was already overwhelmed by millions of laid-off workers seeking benefits... Faulkender stresses that the program was originally designed as a kind of economic lifeboat — to keep workers and businesses afloat and together for what was expected to be a brief shutdown, lasting perhaps two months.

CoinTelegraph – April 24 – Accounting lecturer Samuel Handwerger writes "NFTs and US taxes: What you should know." ... Also picked up by Investing.com, among other outlets.

TalkMarkets – April 24 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the "Year-To-Date Percentage Returns Of 8 Largest Stocks."

Forbes – April 22 – "Understanding Social Media, The First Amendment And The Calls To Incite Violence" quotes information systems associate professor Jui Ramaprasad: "While banning users is one option, platforms are also starting to think – and should think – about how information/misinformation is spread, and which content should be privileged… When algorithms are behind this process of determining what we see on our feed – no matter what platform we are on – it is not clear that the "true" information is privileged over the false."

Science Newsnet – April 21 – "'Best White Paper' Shows Potential Way to Harness AI for a More Equitable Workplace" covers research by Associate Professor of Management Science and Statistics Margrét Bjarnadóttir… Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd gives 'Business Lessons from Europe's Soccer Turmoil' (April 22).

SiriusXM BYU Radio – April 20 – Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya explains the global semiconductor shortage including its supply chain implications, via "Chip Shortage."

WYPR (On the Record) – April 20 – Assistant Dean of the Full-time MBA Program Nicole Coomber discusses "Navigating the Return to the Office."

American Banker – April 19 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments in "AI Enables Banks to Spot Bias Claims in Customers' Complaints": Using AI technology to manage risk has been embedded in most financial institutions' compliance and risk management systems for years. "Risk managers identify and rank-order where hot spots are from a compliance standpoint.," said [Rossi]. Complaints that may appear unrelated to bias do not mean there is no reputational or business risk, Rossi said. Finding those specific complaints can be a challenge as well given that the CFPB received roughly 542,300 complaints last year and nearly 60% of them were about credit reporting, according to a recent CFPB report. "All this information comes in and just like in the old days, you get people looking over complaints — and some might gloss over some important contextual comments that would have been addressed if they had been elevated earlier.

TalkMarkets – April 17 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the 'Year-to-Date Percentage of the 8 Largest Stocks.'

CGTN America – April 16 – Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Marketing Amna Kirmani discusses "How Corporations are Responding to Georgia's New Voter Laws."

Going Concern – April 14 – Accounting Lecturer Samuel Handwerger writes op-ed "Where Does Janet Yellen Want to Be Taxed?"

WNHN/Pacifica Radio Network – April 14 – Associate Professor of Accounting Nick Seybert discusses his recent research ("Recruiting Dark Personalities for Earnings Management"), via "The Attitude with Arnie Arnesen (1:30-25:30)."

Sinclair/WJLA ABC-7 – April 14 – "Companies Defend Voting Rights as GOP Lashes out Against 'Woke Corporations'" quotes Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Marketing Amna Kirmani: "It's much harder for mass-market companies like Coca-Cola or Delta to take a stand because they run higher risks of backlash from part of their consumer segment," said [Kirmani]. "Why would they do it? They do it because there's a big risk of backlash if they don't." … "There are many consumers, particularly millennials and younger consumers, who care deeply… They have been saying for several years they want corporations to represent values, presumably values with which they agree."

Consulting-Specifying Engineer Magazine – April 13 – Dean Prabhudev Konana describes, in a Q&A, "How Tech is Shifting the Educational Landscape."

SupplyChainBrain – April 13 – Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya explains 'The Global Semiconductor Shortage.'

MarketWatch – April 12 – Charles E. Smith Chair Professor of Finance Albert "Pete" Kyle comments in "'Optimism has Huge Risks': Why New Investors, Excited by GameStop's Rollercoaster Ride, Should Rethink Their Rose-Colored Glasses": …Woo cut his rating to sell after being at hold since June 2019. He also lowered his stock price target to $10 — far below Monday's closing price of $145 — from $12, which makes him the most bearish of the seven analysts surveyed by FactSet. But this does show one thing. "Optimism has huge risks to it," said [Kyle]. "Because the last person who becomes optimistic and jumps in the stock market is the one who gets clobbered by the inevitable decline that will occur when people become pessimistic again."Kyle said it's hard to glean the full takeaway from the Schwab survey because the poll participants might already be inclined to trade in the market, and therefore have a rosy view of it. The "more naïve a trader" is more likely their expectations informed by the market's latest activity, he said…

Capital Monitor – April 12 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments in "Climate Stress Tests are Flawed, but Here to Stay": ...As well as making clear that the first round of climate stress tests should not dictate capital buffers, banks, lobby groups and others have also raised concerns about the accuracy of a test that looks 30 years into the future, when bank balance sheets tend to be much shorter term. [Rossi], is concerned that supervisors will consider the job done and "take their eyes off the ball of the next crisis… My concern is that regulators will feel comfortable once they've ticked this off their list, but they're using scenarios that are only as good as our last crisis… Covid provided the perfect example – our adverse scenario modelling was based on a 2008-style crisis, which was nothing like what we saw in 2020. And none of our scenarios worked."

DOMESTIKA Curious Minds Podcast – April 12 – Distinguished University Professor and PepsiCo Chair in Consumer Science Michel Wedel explains the social media marketing effectiveness of Knolling (flat lay photography), via "Always be Knolling."

Science Newsnet – April 12 – Professor of Finance Michael Faulkender describes "A U.S. Corporate Tax Hike's Potential Cost on Global Competitiveness."

TalkMarkets – April 10 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the "2021 Year-To-Date Percentage Returns Of 8 Largest Stocks."

Associated Press via Washington Post – April 8 – Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust comments in "Cash-rich Restaurateurs Take Advantage of Pandemic to Expand": When "desperation sets in for everyone," a kind of creative destruction may result, said [Rust]. Companies then look to dismantle established processes to make way for more sustainable methods of service. Before the pandemic, said Rust, many restaurants had little reason to put away cash. They often operated on models that required revenues to circulate back into the business, a feedback loop that is rock-solid if income is guaranteed... Overall, "forces are pushing for concentration… Chains are pushing out moms and pops," many of which don't have enough capital saved to weather the pandemic storm.

Maryland Today – April 8 – "Alexa, What Time Should I Take My Meds?" covers research into enhancing telehealth for patients' self-care, by Associate Professor of Management Science and Statistics Margrét Bjarnadóttir, France-Merrick Chair in Management Science Bruce Golden and doctoral student Lida Apergi.

Baltimore Sun – April 6 – 'Award-winning Luxury Men's Clothier J.S. Edwards Closing' quotes Assistant Professor of Marketing Yajin Wang: Without weddings and large events canceled and with indoor dining limited for much of the last year, there wasn't a need for luxury clothing, [Wang] said. Instead, casual wear became the attire of choice for many who have been working from home... "I do think that trend is likely to stay at least to some extent" as businesses choose to cut costs by closing office buildings after a year of working remotely has proved to be more efficient, Wang said.

Search Engine Land – April 6 – "Should You Still Advertise at the Point of Purchase? Data Says 'Yes'" assesses new research by Distinguished University Professor and PepsiCo Chair in Consumer Science Michel Wedel: These results show that advertising at the point of purchase (like on Google Shopping or Amazon) can help shoppers find the advertised product more quickly, in part by helping them eliminate products that didn't have the features they were looking for. The researchers concluded that the ads, rather than convincing shoppers to buy a certain product, helped guide them to find and buy a product they'd already decided to purchase.

Fast Company – April 5 – "Jaw-dropping Study: Executives Who Manipulate Earnings are Hired for Their Lack of Ethics" covers research by Associate Professor of Accounting Nick Seybert… Related coverage at

Ladders: "Companies are hiring bosses with these qualities for a terrible reason" (April 6).

CBC Radio – April 5 – Professor of Marketing Amna Kirmani discusses strategy behind "Big Brands [Taking] Aim at the State of Georgia's New Voting Laws."

Fortune – April 4 – Research Professor and Academic Director of the Center for Global Business Kislaya Prasad writes op-ed "Unless the U.S. Changes its Vaccine Policy, the World will Look at us Like Hoarders." … Also featured by Maryland Today: "U.S. Should Share Vaccines to Cover the Globe" (April 6).

TalkMarkets – April 3 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives "2021 Year-to-Date Percentage Returns of 7 Largest Stocks."

Associated Press via ABC News – April 1 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch comments in "Biden Aims to Juice EV Sales, but Would his Plan Work?": [Kirsch] said the Biden plan isn't really a tipping point that will turn consumers from combustion to electric vehicles. "There will be some good changes that will happen because of the scale of this investment, and those should not be minimized," Kirsch said. "I think electrification was coming anyway." … Yet Kirsch says that no matter how effective Biden's plan is or isn't in fighting climate change, the spending on modernizing the transportation fleet and infrastructure is long overdue. "What we're doing is playing catch-up on some long-delayed investment," he said.

MIT Technology Review – April 1 – Assistant Professor of Information Systems Lauren Rhue discusses the popularity and implications of beauty filter software, via the podcast segment "In the AI of the Beholder."

March 2021

ScienceDaily – March 31 – "Firms Recruit Dark Personalities for Earnings Management" features new research in the Journal of Business Ethics co-authored by Associate Professor of Accounting and Information Assurance Nick Seybert. … Also covered at Phys.org, World News Monitor, others.

Philanthropy News Digest – March 28 – "Citizen-Donors of the World" examines a study by marketing professors Yajin Wang and Amna Kirmani that explores "residential mobility" as correlating with higher levels of donations to people and causes outside their local community.

Enterprise Radio – March 27 – Maryland Smith Distinguished Research Fellow and National Taiwan University professor Ming-Hui Huang discusses 'The Feeling Economy' book co-authored with Distinguished University Professor Roland Rust, via "How People Can Effectively Partner with Advanced AI in the Coming Feeling Economy."

Politico – March 26 – Professor of Finance Michael Faulkender comments in " Congress's Trillion-Dollar Question: How Many Jobs did Small-Business Rescue Save?" : One estimate by [Faulkender] put the number of jobs saved in May at 18 million. Faulkender led the Treasury Department team that implemented the program with the SBA… PPP funds relieved pressure on state unemployment insurance systems, which faced huge operational challenges, Faulkender said. He also points to the fact that the U.S. avoided losing jobs at all last May when some economists were expecting 20 percent unemployment. "We did not see the depths of what we could have seen and we recovered faster than we otherwise would have," he said.

Technical.ly – March 26 – " 8 Digital Health Trends Emerging from the Pandemic " quotes CHIDS Managing Director Kenyon Crowley: Alongside telemedicine, tools that can screen a patient at home or diagnose a symptom remotely are also showing promise, said [Crowley]. The pandemic showed "the ability to move more care services to the home environment, where appropriate," he said. "If Amazon is getting to the point where it can send a package in two to three hours, the ability of a clinical service provider to have a test at your door in a day or two is not far off."

B2B News Network – March 26 – ' Intentionally Bad Bosses ' highlights, as part of a broader roundup story, new research co-authored by Associate Professor of Accounting and Information Assurance Nick Seybert: Recruiters and human resource professionals are tasked with weeding out potentially bad bosses…except when that is exactly what higher management want. Questionable ethical standards? Narcissistic tendencies? Those qualities define a person willing to participate in manipulating earnings which can get them the job. "Dark personality traits are often framed as an accidental byproduct of selecting managers who fit the stereotype of a strong leader," says [Seybert]. "However, our research found that this is often no accident." The research found that dark personalities "can fulfill a specific nefarious purpose." If a company feels they need to inflate their earnings, then people with dark personalities are hired to do exactly that.

Medical Bag – March 25 – Senior Associate Dean Ritu Agarwal and Professor Gordon Gao comment extensively in " Provider Confusion Often the Cause of Patient Access Rights Violations " (Republished).

CNN Business – March 24 – Clinical Professor of Management and Assistant Dean of the Full-Time MBA Program Nicole Coomber shares insights into teaching her own classes remotely while managing her childrens' virtual schooling in " How Four Working Mothers are Doing a Year into the Pandemic ."

CityBizList – March 24 – " Global Opportunities for Businesses in Maryland " describes a pair of collaborative initiatives between the Maryland Department of Commerce and Maryland Smith's Center for Global Business: the Maryland Global Consulting Program and the Global Marketing Virtual Internship Program.

Financial Times – March 23 – " Change of Menu: Kraft Heinz Bets on Old Brands to Win New Consumers " quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: [Kass] said: "Everyone is looking at this. This is [3G's] largest investment, and they have a great reputation for cutting costs, but the question is how successful will they be in growing a company's top line and bottom line?" … European rivals Nestlé and Unilever "have both been innovating to some extent in the food product area", said Kass. Unlike them, Kraft Heinz has not moved into plant-based substitute meats, though Patricio points out it does make bean burgers and "protein pots."

TalkMarkets – March 20 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the " One Year Percentage Return of 7 Largest Stocks ."

Ladders – March 18 – "Got a Powerful Boss? They Probably Have This Problem" quotes Assistant Professor of Management and Organization Trevor Foulk and summarizes his research forthcoming in the Journal of Applied Psychology: "Power is generally considered a desirable thing, as leaders often seek power, and it's very rare for leaders to turn powerful roles down," says [Foulk]. "However, this view is qualified by the fact that many leaders feel exhausted and overburdened by their work. Our work helps shed light on this paradox, as it helps us understand why leaders might want powerful positions (they achieve more goal progress and feel that their work is more meaningful), but also face substantial consequences (their jobs feel more demanding in a way that causes anxiety and physical pain)."

FIND MBA – March 17 – Assistant Dean for Part-Time MBA and Online Programs Paulo Prochno contributes to "How to Secure a Competitive Online MBA Place": Another school enjoying a bump in applications is the University of Maryland's Smith School of Business. "Some people lost jobs or were furloughed, so they decided it was a good time to start an MBA," says [Prochno]. "Others were looking at the future and thinking that two years from now, companies will be in growth mode. Also, working online has cancelled commuting, so people have more time available to do an MBA."In 2020, Smith launched a new Flex MBA program, enabling students to switch back and forth between online and on campus learning. "Those changes do make the program more attractive to new students, so the idea is to grow the whole pie," says Prochno. … Also at FIND MBA: Maryland Smith is among "Top 10 Online MBA Programs for Employer Funding" (March 17).

Women's Wear Daily (via Yahoo News) – March 16 – "Walmart and Target Push Essential Advantage" quotes Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang: "Walmart well utilized its logistic and technological strengths to expand its market position during the pandemic," said [Zhang]. "The surge in demand for online shopping, including purchases of essential products, created a great opportunity to broaden the reach of its e-commerce business to many new customers… Walmart's widespread store locations not only continued to serve a large number of American shoppers in the offline space, but also allowed the retailer to utilize stores as fulfillment centers to meet online demand and to shorten delivery times."

The Daily Beast (via Reader Supported News) – March 15 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan comments in "Newsmax Ratings are Collapsing but Insiders Claim Victory": While some Newsmax insiders feel that the plummeting viewership is much ado about nothing, as other cable news networks also experience a post-inaugural erosion, others suggest that the fledgling network's days of hoping to compete head-to-head with Fox are all but over, and that Newsmax will inevitably return to the fringes. "I would look at it from the viewpoint of consumer marketing," said [Kannan], who has studied the dynamics of the cable industry. "Let's say you have Post and Kellogg cereals and each has a brand of raisin bran, and then a new, healthier version comes out with no sugar and some raisin bran eaters might like the healthier option even though it's bland. So they're going to focus on the consumers who want the healthier version and take them away from Post and Kellogg." … "After a while, you see that it starts dissipating. I don't think it's going to go back to the level of, say, August 2020"—when "Newsmax was not a player" and drawing a total viewership in the barely measurable 30,000 range. "But over time it will slowly erode. They will have to fight for their survival, like they were doing before."

Poets & Quants – March 15 – "Meet the Masters of Supply Chain Management" includes a profile of Maryland Smith's Angela Murca.

MBA Crystal Ball (India) – March 15 – "Best Entrepreneurship Ideas after MBA" features a Q&A with Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship Managing Director Holly DeArmond.

TalkMarkets – March 13 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the "One-Year Percentage Return Of 7 Largest Stocks."

Wall Street Journal – March 11 – "What came before the $9 billion bet on flying taxis," references research by- Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch on New York City's 1987-1912 electric taxi industry: In New York, the electric-taxi business boomed. In June 1898 alone, nearly 1,600 customers traveled a total of 4,400 miles, according to [Kirsch]. They paid 30 cents a mile, more than $9.75 in today's money. (Horse-drawn cabs charged 50 cents a mile.)

Tadias Magazine – March 11 – Lemma Senbet, William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance, explains the new African Continental Free Trade Area designed to help member states overcome chronic burdens on commerce and their economies.

Renal and Urology News – March 10 – Senior Associate Dean Ritu Agarwal and Professor Gordon Gao comment extensively through "Provider Confusion Often the Cause of Patient Access Rights Violations," including: ..Agarwal said there are numerous examples of adverse outcomes associated with lapses in health information privacy, including discrimination and denial of employment. "Unfortunately, the rules and regulations have not evolved with the rest of the healthcare industry, which has increasingly focused on patient empowerment and engagement as a key element of health and wellness." … The use of AI poses significant challenges that will need to be addressed. "Patient health data is like a gold mine," Dr. Gao said. "There needs to be more changes to HIPAA for a "fair use" of the data so the algorithms can learn from it. This can lead to better decision support for doctors, which will benefit all of us. "By no means," he continued, "are we suggesting to weaken privacy protection. Rather, by leveraging technology, we can achieve the dual goal of enhancing privacy protection and improving information sharing for better care."

Scientific American – March 9 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments in "Big U.S. Banks May Curb Lending to Fossil Fuel Companies": "It's good for regulatory oversight, from their standpoint," said [Rossi]. "By getting ahead of this and making these declarations about these commitments, it puts them in a positive light with regard to the regulator," he added. "[They're] demonstrating that they're being proactive as opposed to waiting until it's foisted onto them." … That left observers wondering how the banks intend to make good on their commitments—or if they themselves know. "I'm not at all surprised that the description of their commitments are fairly hazy and will remain that way for some time," said Rossi, the risk management expert. "It's more of a strategic vision, maybe aspirational in some sense. The board and the CEO are saying, 'That's the direction we need to go; we want that as our target.' And now they'll circle the troops and get them marching down a path."

Business Insider – March 9 – Assistant Professor of Management and Organization Trevor Foulk's research and comments contribute to "How to tell if your personality traits are a bad match for remote work- and what research says to do about it": Highly neurotic people often have trouble disconnecting from work and the remote environment exacerbates these tendencies, says [Foulk], who's published research in this area. "In an office, it's easy for neurotic employees to see all of their co-workers packing up for the day, and think, 'It's time for me to do the same.' But now, they're not getting those visual cues as much," he says. "When you combine that with the fact that basically anytime is now work time, it can create a scenario where any minute they're not working, they feel guilty about it." If this describes you, Foulk recommends creating a social system that signals when the workday is considered "over" by your group. Perhaps you and your team members can turn off your green Slack lights at the same time; or maybe you and your favorite colleagues develop your own ritual for signing off. … (Republished by FNTalk.com).

TalkMarkets – March 6 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the "One-Year Percentage Return Of 7 Largest Stocks."

CBS New York – March 5 – Albert Pete Kyle, the Charles E. Smith Chair Professor of Finance, comments throughout "Stimulus Check Update: Are Relief Payments Bad For The Economy?": "I would err on the side of moderation and conservatism in the sense of not make it too big… Because the dangers of doing too much are really catastrophic. The dangers of doing not enough are that you can do more…"

Nikkei (Japan) – March 5 – "Buffett, is it a shadow of mythical power? Pros and cons of deviation from reality" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "Mr. Buffett, who has a very optimistic outlook for the future of the United States, may not have wanted to look away from his predictions by touching Corona," said David Kass…

LSE Business Review – March 4 – Associate Professor of Management and Organization Cynthia K. Stevens co-authors "Cross-understanding will help complex and diverse teams achieve mutually agreeable solutions" … Also at Qrius (formerly The Indian Economist).

TechTarget – March 4 – "Employee-Poaching Risk Increases with Remote-Work Hiring" quotes Assistant Professor of Management and Organization Evan Starr: Workers in Washington, D.C., may no longer have to worry about noncompete agreements. Its new law broadly prohibits noncompete agreements. "The D.C. bill is among the most expansive in the country," said [Starr]. D.C.'s law imposes financial penalties on employers that attempt to impose noncompete agreements in violation of the law. The law also requires employers notify employees about the noncompete law. But remote work will challenge state boundaries, over which state noncompete laws apply, Starr said.

Bollyinside – March 4 – "Maryland Smith Experts Assess Bitcoin's Viability As A Currency And An Asset" features insights from Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship Brent Goldfarb and Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass.

The Connected Enterprise (podcast) – March 3 -Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust discusses his book, The Feeling Economy, via "The Feeling Economy: Roland Rust on AI and New Business Opportunities." … Related: Rust writes guest piece, "The Feeling Economy and Customer Empathy," for StrategyDriven (March 3), and his Feeling Economy co-author Ming-Hui Huang writes, via Ms. Career Girl, "The Female Advantage: Why women will be on top when AI Rules the Business World" (March 2).

Science Newsnet – March 3 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi gives insights on "Climate Risk Management for Financial Organizations."

February 2021

Washington Post – Feb. 26 – Assistant Professor of Management Trevor Foulk's research and comments help explain "Homecomings used to feel special. But that was before we spent all our time at home": In a two-week study conducted [by Foulk] at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, subjects reported feeling like themselves again within the 14-day span of the research. [Foulk] said most stressors are episodic — they happen and are finished, like losing a job or going through a breakup. "Because we've generally thought of stressors that way, no one ever really asked, 'Do we start recovering even while the thing is happening?'" … The study suggests that people rebound more quickly than you might expect. Despite the continued presence of the stressor, "our psychological immune system was still working in a surprisingly efficient way," Foulk wrote. … But we adapted, after a fashion. As the pandemic dragged on, Foulk said, our days came to revolve around home as they once had around work. "That's what you miss now," he said.

Maryland Today – Feb. 26 – Senior Associate Dean Ritu Agarwal explains "How COVID-19 is changing healthcare."

Forbes – Feb. 25 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph Lamone Professor of Entrepreneurship, writes "How and Why To Mentor In Your Chosen Village."

ERE.net – Feb. 24 – Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing

Roland Rust writes "The 'Feeling Economy' and Its Impact on Hiring" based on his book "The Feeling Economy.

Maryland Today – Feb. 24 – Accounting Lecturer Samuel Handwerger gives "4 Reasons to File Your Taxes Early" headlining Maryland Today this morning.

Sciencenewsnet – Feb. 24 – "People who move give more to global causes" covers research co-authored by marketing professors Yajin Wang and Amna Kirmani.

Maryland Today – Feb. 23 – Robert H. Smith Professor of Information Systems Emeritus Henry C. Lucas explains how "How a Patchwork of Federal IT Is Slowing Vaccinations."

SmartBrief – Feb. 22 – "Community connections help independent restaurants stay afloat amid pandemic" reviews a Maryland Business: Rebooted webinar co-moderated by Clinical Professor of Marketing Judy Frels and Washington Post food writer Tim Carman.

HealthWorks Collective – Feb. 20 – "How Will the Supply Chain Support Vaccine Distribution?" quotes Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya: …However, many items that are regularly delivered to those vaccine destinations above also require cold storage, so proper delivery is more important than actually creating spaces to keep the vaccines cold. "if any point along the vaccine supply chain is not able to maintain the requirements of the cold chain, then we can have issues of spoilage and obsolescence," says Suresh Acharya, Professor of Practice at the University of Maryland Robert H. Smith School of Business.

TalkMarkets – Feb. 19 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass updates "The One-Year Percentage Return of the 7 Largest Stocks."

The Social Media Monthly – Feb. 19 – Information systems professor Jui Ramaprasad writes "How McDonald's Found a New 'Authenticity' With McRib Memes."

The Future Raise – Feb. 19 – "How Tesla's Bitcoin Play Fits into Cryptocurrency Taxation" features insights from accounting lecturer Samuel Handwerger… Also published at OLT News, Bit-Smart and Crypto News BTC.

Luzerner Zeitung (Switzerland) – Feb. 19 – Marketing Professor Jie Zhang comments in "Ski slope, aquarium and a ferris wheel: is this what the future of the American shopping center looks like?": [Zhang] points out that in the future shopping centers will have to offer consumers much more than just a shopping experience. But Zhang also says it might be years before such a mall can operate at full speed. At the moment, many people would not want to be in an enclosed space for long periods of time – let alone on a roller coaster or in an indoor pool. Operators are therefore well advised to carefully consider investments.

CNN Business – Feb. 18 – "Here's What We Can Learn from The GameStop Craze" quotes Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch: "The real fear is that the air may be coming out of this speculative bubble and will infect other stocks," said [Kirsch]. Kirsch added that the huge rally in Tesla and the current market infatuation with so-called "blank check special purpose acquisition company stocks, or SPACs, could eventually subside. … In other words, anyone who is looking to buy or sell a financial asset has to do their homework. "It's good to democratize the stock market, but look where it leads us, … There is a need for more market literacy"

Market Realist – Feb. 18 – "Bill Gates Once Helped Steve Jobs With a $150 Million Investment in Apple" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "Apple's $2 trillion valuation represents about 10 percent of GDP for the U.S. and about 7 percent of the S&P 500," [Kass] told NBC News at the time. "Its iPhone is ubiquitous. It has transformed the way we live. Its ecosystem is self-sustaining."

ScienMag – Feb. 18 – "Social Tool Tracks Brand Reputation In Real Time And Over The Long Term" describes a Brand Reputation Tracker -- a framework for assessing brand reputation in real time and over time – developed by an international team of researchers including Roland Rust, Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing.

The Business Monthly – Feb. 17 – "Forum on Strategic Retail Management" previews Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang moderating a Feb. 24 retail-strategy discussion with James Thomson of Buy Box Experts and Katherine Cullen and Adam Lukoskie of the National Retail Federation – as part of the Maryland Business: Rebooted webinar series.

OilPrice.com via Yahoo Finance – Feb. 17 – "Chevron Is Buffett's Latest Billion-Dollar 'Mystery' Investment" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "He is undoubtedly building a large position now and may reveal it in his next 13F," [Kass] told Business Insider in November. "Buffett has received confidentiality treatment several times in the past," Kass noted.

Business Creators Radio – Feb. 16 – "How Humans Can Effectively Partner with Advanced AI in the Coming "Feeling Economy" is an interview with Roland Rust, Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing, based on his book, "The Feeling Economy."

Business Insider – Feb. 13 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch comments in "Tesla's big bitcoin buy won't worry the SEC, experts say, and could legitimize crypto as a diversification strategy": "To me, it feels a little bit like coming up with a new story," [Kirsch] told Insider. "You don't have to buy bitcoin to accept it for payment." He also said that he saw some connections between Tesla's move and the recent battle over the stock price of GameStop, a struggling retailer whose shares were run up by a trading community on Reddit, forcing some Wall Street hedge funds that had shorted the stock to cover their positions. Kirsch expressed concern that Tesla was jumping into bitcoin soon after being included in the S&P 500 index, putting Tesla's shares into the retirement portfolios of everyday investors with retirement funds. "The risk is multiplied," he said. "It's not necessarily a legal concern, but it goes to trust in markets and stability." But a consensus does appear to have developed around Tesla's bitcoin play. "This legitimizes bitcoin for others," Kirsch said. "And it brings bitcoin into the mainstream."

TalkMarkets – Feb. 13 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the 'One-year percentage change to date of the 7 largest stocks.'

Washington Business Journal – Feb. 12 – "For University of Maryland's new business school dean, helping first-generation students is key" introduces and profiles Prabhudev Konana as Maryland Smith's Dean.

GARP (Global Association of Risk Professionals) – Feb. 12 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments extensively in "Risk Management Silicon Valley-Style," including: "At this point [big tech companies'] policies regarding use of their platforms seem much more like a visceral reaction to current events in terms of some of the actions being taken for whatever strategic objectives they may have, rather than a methodical exercise in risk management."

Clear Admit/Metro MBA – Feb. 11 – "New Flex MBA for Part-Time Students at Maryland Smith" reports on Maryland Smith's newly designed MBA program for part-time students taking courses through the school's Baltimore, Rockville, and Washington, D.C. locations. Also reported via Poets&Quants (Scroll down), Maryland Daily Record, others.

Forbes – Feb. 9 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph Lamone Professor of Entrepreneurship, writes "Being Enterprising In Your Own World To Change The World."

The Guardian – Feb. 9 – I thought buying things would make me feel better. It didn't': The rise of emotional spending" quotes Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan: … It turns out that companies know when I am weak – and this is when they target me. "Companies will know what kind of content you engage with at different times during the day," says [Kannan]. Marketers even analyse the circadian rhythms of their users and schedule their content at times when they are particularly receptive to buying things online.

MultiBriefs – Feb. 9 – Drawing from their book "The Feeling Economy," Roland Rust and Ming-Hui Huang co-author 'Are Knowledge Workers Doomed?'

Maryland Today – Feb. 8 – Marketing professors Henry C. Boyd III, Judy Frels and Amna Kirmani review the Super Bowl 55 commercials in "Super Bowl Ads That Scored—Even When the Game Didn't."

Maryland Daily Record – Feb. 8 – "'It's the future': Canton salon now accepts bitcoin payments" quotes Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship Brent Goldfarb: [Goldfarb] said bitcoin's volatility makes it ineffective as an actual currency. If it's expected to go up, consumers will want to hold it until it's at its most valuable; if it's expected to go down, they will get rid of it as quickly as possible. "That's bad if you're a currency, because you really want currency to lubricate trade, not get in the way of trade," he said… Despite not believing in the bright future for bitcoin, Goldfarb noted that there is little risk in using it as part of your business model unless you put all of your money into bitcoin, which will be next to impossible unless many more companies begin to accept it as payment. "Rent isn't in bitcoin and electricity isn't in bitcoin," he said.

AMEinfo (Business news for Middle East region) – Feb. 7 – 'Electric vehicles and batteries in the driver seat in 2021' quotes Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch: "EV entrepreneurs have figured out they can ride the Tesla wave," said [Kirsch] It's a phenomenon he thinks has all the hallmarks of a bubble, with Tesla's mind-blowing $800-billion valuation stoking imaginations.

TalkMarkets – Feb. 6 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass updates the "One-year percentage change of the seven largest stocks."

PR News – Feb. 5 – "Realigned CSR, Online BrandMarketing, Fun Shopping to Mark 2021" includes an outlook contributed by Michel Wedel, PepsiCo chair in consumer science:"The pandemic accelerated the shift toward online and mobile shopping. A large part of this shift will be permanent, as consumers have incorporated new behaviors into their altered lifestyles. The shift toward online is beneficial for branded products because of the trust and consistency they provide…"

WTOP – Feb. 4 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd III previews Super Bowl 55 ads in "Super Bowl commercials: Expect a different tone this year."

School for Startups Radio – Feb. 4 – Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust and host Jim Beach discuss (31:20-53:30) Rust's book "The Feeling Economy: How Artificial Intelligence Is Creating the Era of Empathy," including the assertion: "AI does the thinking tasks. People just pushed into things where they have a differentiation advantage over AI, things like emotional intelligence and empathy."

CNET – Feb. 1 – "Reddit's AMC, GameStop surge happened because of anger over Wall Street" quotes Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch: "In one sense, this is 'Occupy Wall Street' via the trading desk rather than from Zuccotti Park."

Food Logistics Magazine – Feb. 1 – Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya writes guest column on "The Importance of End-to-End Supply Chain Visibility."

Diamondback – Feb. 1 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments in "UMD students profit off of GameStop gains during Wall Street frenzy": When investing in the stock market, an individual can either invest a long or a short, [Kass] said. The individual investors invested in a long, which is when a person buys shares of a company, expecting it to do well. If the prices of shares go up, the investor makes a profit. With a short, which is what hedge fund managers had been doing with GameStop's stocks, an investor borrows a share of a company from a stockbroker, expecting the stock to decrease in price. The short seller then sells the borrowed shares, planning to buy back the share at the lower price, making profit from the difference. However, Wall Street has claimed that since the individual investors coordinated together to drive the market up, it constitutes market manipulation, said Kass. But he does not consider that manipulation.

January 2021

Tom's Guide – Jan. 31 – "Comcast's Data Caps During a Pandemic are Unethical" quotes Rudolph Lamone Chair of Strategy and Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal: According to [Agarwal] this strategy goes back to AT&T's dominance in landlines throughout much of the 20th century. In an article for Forbes, Dr. Agarwal writes, "economic law dictates that consumer prices come down and quality goes up with competition. But AT&T executives successfully lobbied for the reverse."

CNET – Jan. 30 – "Reddit's AMC, GameStop stock surge is all about screwing over Wall Street"

quotes Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch: "In one sense, this is 'Occupy Wall Street' via the trading desk rather than from Zuccotti Park," said [Kirsch]. "We are seeing that 3 million small investors in a Reddit forum, when acting in a coordinated fashion, can seriously distort regular price movements." … Related: International Business Times' "Reddit's WallStreetBets Group Goes Rogue After Wild Week Of Trading" quotes Kirsch from CNET.

Barron's – Jan. 29 –Letters to the Editor includes "Borrowing for Growth" by Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Kudos to Matthew C. Klein for his persuasive argument that additional borrowing by the federal government to fund investments that boost growth, such as for infrastructure, public health, education, and scientific research, would effectively pay for itself while being unlikely to add to inflation and raise interest rates… Even though federal debt has increased by $15 trillion since the end of 2008, the current historically low interest rates have enabled the federal government's net interest payments relative to gross domestic product to equal only 2%. This is its lowest percentage since the 1950s and is one-half of the 4% paid in the 1980s and 1990s. With the interest rate of 1.84% on the 30-year U.S. Treasury bond, the return on the proposed investments by the federal government is very likely to exceed its very low cost of capital.

Slate – Jan. 28 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch contributes to "All the Ways the GameStop Roller-Coaster Could End": "It's sort of Occupy Wall Street by the trading desk instead of by Zuccotti Park," says [Kirsch]. "That's real. It's a social movement. It's organized market action.""At least a company like Tesla has a story…I don't buy it, but they've got a narrative for why the company is worth something. Every time something threatens that narrative, they have a chief executive who's able to recast it. As soon as we come to some sort of denouement, he takes the ball and throws it down the field, so, gotta go chase it. It's very hard for me to see how the GameStop narrative gets you to $25 billion. If it's just literally these Reddit people buying and buying and buying, at some point they run out of money."

InvestorPlace – Jan. 28 – "7 Stock Predictions For Biden's First Year" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Although former Vice President Joe Biden is planning to raise taxes on high income earners and corporations, he is also planning to spend more to stimulate the economy by assisting those who were hurt by the lockdowns and overall reduction in economic activity induced in response to the coronavirus. Additional investment and spending on infrastructure should create many jobs. Professor Kass further suggests, "The stock market should do well over time as President Biden's economic policies will result in greater stability in both domestic issues and international relations." … Related: Kass gives the year-to-date 'Percentage Change Of 7 Largest Stocks,' via TalkMarkets (Jan. 30).

CBS New York – Jan. 27 – "Is GameStop's Soaring Stock An Indicator Of Possible Market Bubble?" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: … "Many millennials, younger investors, opened accounts, for example, through Robinhood and other brokerage firms, which, in turn, actually around the same time, stopped charging commissions or fees to trade in the stock market…So basically a frictionless system, encouraging investment. So, a lot of the money that couldn't be spent in the economy, because a lot of it was shut down, temporarily, would be reallocated to investment in the stock market." Related: Kass quoted the following day in Sinclair Broadcasting's "Internet prank or 'revolution'? Making sense of the GameStop stock surge" (Jan. 28): "There was this feeling of, 'Let's get even with these hedge funds, let's get back at them… The hedge funds are indeed hurting, and, unfortunately, it's not just the hedge funds that get hurt… This has a ripple effect… I think we need to see, are more guardrails needed, because is there potential for systemic risk here?... This could build up over time. Somehow or other, we need to figure out a way to calm things down."

ScienceNewsNet – Jan. 27 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd III gives strategy via "A Pandemic Playbook for Super Bowl Advertisers."

Washington Business Journal – Jan. 26 – Maryland Smith's No. 10 ranking is spotlighted in "UMd. is among top online MBA programs, according to U.S. News & World Report." … Related at Maryland Today: "U.S. News Ranks Online Business, Engineering Programs Among Nation's Best."

TechRepublic – Jan. 25 – "Can the US solve its COVID-19 vaccination supply chain problems?" quotes professor emeritus Sandor Boyson: A survey of 1,800 medical suppliers recently exposed the fact that 360 different variations of needles are "capped," meaning that there are shortages. According to [Boyson], "850 million needles and syringes are required for successful delivery of the vaccine."

Talk Markets – Jan. 23 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass reports the "One Year Percentage Change of 7 Largest Stocks."

Los Angeles Times (via Yahoo Finance) – Jan. 22 – "Lucid Motors prepares to go public thanks to Saudi money and SPAC mania" quotes Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch: "EV entrepreneurs have figured out they can ride the Tesla wave… When you combine [SPACs] with Robinhood investing, the gamification of finance, fractional share ownership, and novice investors, there's a lot of opportunity for opportunistic behavior." … Related: Silicon Valley Business Journal republishes Kirsch's comments in "Lucid Motors Suitor's Stock Soars on New Report" (Jan. 22).

Tadias Magazine – Jan. 22 – "Professor Lemma Senbet's Unchartered Journey" profiles the career of William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance Lemma Senbet.

Digiday – Jan. 21 – "Why ethical dilemmas are putting brands and their media buying in the spotlight" quotes Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan: "In coming up with the Kaepernick ad, Nike knew that the issue resonated with its core consumer segments — younger, more urban, and more progressive… While there was a backlash from conservative media and groups, it did not affect Nike as a brand much and sales remained steady or even increased."

InvestorPlace – Jan. 20 – "7 Stocks to Buy as the Biden Presidency Begins" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "Additional investment and spending on infrastructure should create many jobs. An easing of tensions with our trade partners in Europe and with China, including the reduction or elimination of tariffs, should lead to a substantial increase in international trade and improved economic well-being for all countries involved."

The Street – Jan. 19 – Research Professor and Center for Global Business Academic Director Kislaya Prasad comments throughout "'A Return to Normal' – What the Economy Will Look Like Under Biden."

Minutehack (UK) – Jan. 19 – Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust and co-author Ming-Hui Huang write "Feeling Intelligence will Become Dominant in the Economy within 15 Years." … Related: TecHR Series' "The Feeling Economy: How AI is Creating the Era of Empathy" (Jan. 21) covers the release of the authors' "The Feeling Economy" book.

DataBird Business Journal – Jan. 13 – 'The Countries that are most Women-Friendly have Several Times the GDP of the Average Country' comprises a Q&A with Roland Rust, David Bruce Smith Chair, on his forthcoming "The Feeling Economy" book co-authored with Ming-Hui Huang of National Taiwan University… Related coverage: Real Leaders Magazine op-ed, "Why it's Time to Embrace AI and Prepare for the Feeling Economy" (Jan. 13); book review at The Magic Pen (Jan. 11); and "Profiles of Success" – a Q&A at Money for Lunch (Jan. 6).

Marketplace Radio – Jan. 12 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang comments in "Walmart Wants to be Your Bank": "The biggest benefit of getting into this venture is to strengthen its position in retailing," said [Zhang]... Zhang thinks the company might encourage spending through extra discounts, rebates and rewards. Plus, Walmart already has deep relationships with two core groups: its 2.2 million employees and its existing shoppers. "Walmart's core customer base primarily consists of low-to-middle-income households… Some of them don't own a regular bank account."

Forbes – Jan. 12 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph Lamone Chair of Strategy and Entrepreneurship, writes "The Meaning Of Work For A Happy Life (And New Year)."… Related: Agarwal's "Three Myths That Undercut The Antitrust Case Against Google" is one of five columns featured in Forbes Favorites 2020: The Year's Best Leadership Stories (Feb. 27).

CBS New York – Jan. 12 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments throughout "Surging Stock Market Reflects 'Very Bright Outlook' For Economy, Finance Prof Says."

Morning Consult – Jan. 12 – Professor Emeritus Mike Ball writes "Who's First for Vaccines, And What's Missed Along the Way." … Related coverage: 'Focus on Distribution Speed' in U.S. Supply Chain Management Council News (Jan. 13).

InvestorPlace via Business Insider – Jan. 8 – "NIO Stock Puts Delisting Scare in the Rearview Mirror" quotes Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch: [Kirsch] recently wrote: "For decades, the electric vehicle has been seen as the car of tomorrow but never quite the car of today."

Memphis Commercial Appeal – Jan. 7 – 'How on-time FedEx, UPS and US Postal Service were for Holiday Shipping Season' quotes Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang:"Larger retailers invested in data analytics and selling products "with fairly consistent demand" are in a better position than others to provide accurate volume forecasts, said [Zhang]… Zhang is quoted by same outlet in "FedEx in 2021": "Consumers are being partly pushed by this pandemic to shifting their purchases online," she said. "Once they get more used to the convenience and the benefit of online shopping and figure out how to deal with some of the hassle, they're going to stay with it."

SME Horizon – Jan. 6 – "Crowdfunding Potentially Levels Entrepreneurs' Fundraising Playing Field" summarizes research co-authored by Professor of Information Systems Il-Horn Hann.

The Hill – Jan. 4 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes "Pulling Back the Curtain on Bank Climate Stress Tests."

Daily FT (Sri Lanka) – Jan. 4 – "Lankan-born Raschid makes Sri Lanka proud in computer science" profiles Professor of Information Systems Louiqa Raschid as part of announcing her being named an EEEI Fellow.

Past Years

December 2020

HousingWire – Dec. 31 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes "Making Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac into a Single Utility."

Australian Financial Review – Dec. 31 – "How Free Money will Remake the Economy" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Most believe the support will hold until the pandemic is beaten, which optimists – and financial markets – are betting will be the story of 2021. "The accommodative monetary policy is being pursued by central banks to assist the world economy to recover from the pandemic until the vaccine is available to everyone… Even though there are likely to be moderate tax increases in a Biden administration, the President will be leading an effort to substantially increase spending in areas such as healthcare, education and the environment. The resulting expansionary fiscal policy along with the accommodative monetary policy of the Federal Reserve should result in rapid growth of GDP in 2021 and the following few years."

Bloomberg Opinion – Dec 30 – "How Texas Can Become the Next Silicon Valley" cites and quotes findings co-authored by Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr and Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph Lamone Chair of Strategy and Entrepreneurship: [The paper "Mobility Constraint" forthcoming at Organizational Science] finds that in states that enforce noncompetes, industries with more of these agreements "receive relatively fewer job offers, have reduced mobility and experience lower wages.

Forbes India – Dec. 27 – Shuye Lu, PhD Candidate in Organizational Behaviour, writes "Pitching Novel Ideas: A User's Guide to Success."

Strategic Management – Dec. 26 – "Meet the Scholar" podcast series features Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph Lamone Chair of Strategy and Entrepreneurship.

Talk Markets – Dec. 25 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives the "Year-to-Date Performance of the 7 Largest Stocks." Also at ValueWalk (Jan. 4).

E-Campus News – Dec. 24 – Professor Emeritus Henry C. Lucas Jr.'s op-ed "Is Face-to-Face Learning Always Better than Online Learning?" is republished as among the publication's 'most popular in 2020.

Women's Wear Daily – Dec. 22 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang comments extensively in "The Walmart Formula and Its E-commerce Push."

Capital News Service via Delmarva Now – Dec. 22 – "Maryland Hopeful for Biden's Environmental Impact"quotes Research Professor Kislaya Prasad: "By most objective criteria, the economy did fairly well until the pandemic hit. Unemployment was low, growth was robust and wages had started to rise. The improvement even started to show up in traditionally depressed parts of the country (Western Pennsylvania, West Virginia, parts of Ohio)," [Prasad] said… When green initiatives are instituted, some things will cost more and some industries will feel the economic effects more than others. At the same time, new jobs are created in making those renewable energy resources, Prasad said... According to Prasad, the cost of renewable energy has been falling — so there may be increased money that could be allocated toward the environment.

HuffPost – Dec. 21 – "Tesla Just Joined The S&P 500 Index ― Here's Why That's A Big Deal" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass:Tesla's market cap grew $500 billion this year to about $695 billion, equal to that of the nine largest car companies in the world. In fact, Tesla is now the sixth-largest company in the U.S., behind Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Alphabet (Google's parent company) and Facebook, according to [Kass]. Since Tesla will be given a weight of 1.69% in this index, he said, its swings will add to the overall volatility of the index.

U.S. News & World Report – Dec. 18 – "Are Stocks, Real Estate in Asset Bubbles?" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Though Kass acknowledges some "extraordinary" post-IPO rallies, he argues that "the companies in question are of much higher quality with much better future prospects in terms of both growth and profitability than the IPOs of the 1999 dot-com era." Kass says, "Interest rates in 1999 were considerably higher than they are today." … "Since rates of return on fixed-income investments are at historically low levels, investors have focused on other asset classes such as equities, real estate and cryptocurrencies in order to earn a non-zero rate of return," Kass says.

GARP (Global Association of Risk Professionals) Dec. 18 – "Doing the Right Thing: Diversity & Inclusion and the Risk Function" quotes Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi: [Rossi] reasons that such actions are likely being "driven by current events rather than the proactive and altruistic nature of banks." However, he added, "It's the right thing to do, the right moment in time to step up, and it's good for business."

Portent (Blog) – Dec. 17 – Associate Clinical Professor in Marketing Mary Harms contributes to "Digital Marketing Trends in Education for 2021."

Marketplace Radio – Dec. 16 – "Number of Americans Moving Homes hit Lowest Level in 73 Years" quotes Assistant Professor of Marketing Evan Starr: Another reason for low migration according [Starr] was that Americans just don't change jobs as much as they used to. "I think what it says is our labor markets at the moment are not vibrant. When workers move between jobs, they bring with them their knowledge, their expertise, their ideas, and this is important for innovation, it's also important for firm learning," said Starr. But current migration numbers could change, he continued, in a work-from- home-world. "It's much easier to change jobs if you're just sitting at your computer, so I think the growth in work-from-home the pandemic has spurred is going to reduce labor market frictions."

Kivo Daily – Dec. 16 – Roland Rust, David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing, and Ming-Hui Huang co-author "Feelings-Based Education: A New Curriculum for the Coming Economy" – drawing from their forthcoming The Feeling Economy book.

Washington Post – Dec. 15 – Video story "The coronavirus vaccine is here. Now the race is on for more glass and ice" features supply chain-expert insights from Research Professor Sandor Boyson… Related insights from Boyson in Maryland Today's "After COVID Vaccine Breakthroughs, Eyes Turn to Supply Chain (Nov. 19).

Forbes – Dec. 15 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph Lamone Chair of Strategy and Entrepreneurship, writes "Finding Good Profit from COVID-19 Vaccines." … Previous Agarwal-Forbes columns: "Trust the Science but Celebrate the Business of COVID-19 Vaccines (Nov. 24) and "Finding Joy When Chores And Pressures Pile Up At Work" (Nov. 16).

Seeking Alpha – Dec. 15 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "16 Stocks for 2021." Also published by ValueWalk and Corona Stocks.

BizEd Magazine – Dec. 14 – PepsiCo Chair in Consumer Science Michel Wedel, writes "Boosting Business With Webinars," which describes the creation and delivery of Maryland Business: Rebooted – a Maryland Smith initiative to support Maryland businesses and workers challenged by the COVID-10 pandemic.

FIND MBA – Dec. 12 – "Business Schools Explore a Future Beyond the GMAT" quotes Senior Director of the Full-Time MBA and Specialty Master's Programs Pasquale Quintero: Schools with waivers, however, report increases in applications. The University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business has extended its test waiver policy to make it easier for qualified students to apply for an MBA place, says [Quintero]. "If we still required the GMAT or GRE as part of our application process, it's highly likely many of our applicants would have not applied to our MBA programs, putting their career objectives on hold."

Sinclair Broadcast Group (via ABC-30 St. Louis) – Dec. 11 – "As coronavirus relief debate drags on, some push for new round of stimulus checks" quotes David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust: Eviction moratoriums and rental assistance programs are also set to expire at the end of the month. Additional job losses and cuts to vital social welfare programs loom if further aid is not provided to state and local governments. "There's so much urgency among so many people in the population," said [Rust]. "They're really hurting. And the small retailers are really, really hurting." The Congressional Budget Office estimated the economic impact payments produced a 0.6% boost in gross domestic product, less than small business loans under the Paycheck Protect Program and only about half the effect of the enhanced unemployment benefits. If political considerations limit the scope of a new relief package, stimulus checks might not be the most efficient use of the money… Still, Rust expects there would be a significant stimulative effect from another round of direct payments… "If you're poor and you're living from paycheck to paycheck and you get a check, you're going to go out and spend it."

UNESCA – Dec. 10 – "Experts push for strong public-private partnerships to build resilient post-COVID-19 economies" references Lemma W. Senbet, William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance: [Senbet] emphasized the role of knowledge and innovation in building resilient economies. He noted that there are huge capacity and knowledge gaps in Africa that need to be closed as countries focus on working to recover from COVID-19.

LifeWire – Dec. 10 – "The Tech We Said Goodbye To In 2020" includes input on Quibi from PepsiCo Chair in Consumer Science Michel Wedel: "In general, the pandemic was one of the problems that they were having, but at the same time, I think they had a number of other problems during the launch that were not sufficiently thought through that essentially caused the low-interest levels" … Wedel says that the app put too much stake into targeting people on the go, which didn't register during a pandemic. Wedel said Quibi's mobile-only model should have shifted as a response. Another downfall of Quibi was the emphasis it put on its Turnstyle video technology. Subscribers could watch Quibi's content full screen in both portrait and landscape, depending on how they rotated their phones, but that feature wasn't as important to some. "People come for the content, not necessarily for the way you view it."

CEO World -Dec. 7 – Roland Rust, David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing, and Ming-Hui Huang co-author "Management in the Feeling Economy: Tips for Fostering Human-Machine Collaboration," op-ed drawing from their forthcoming The Feeling Economy book.

Phys.org – Dec. 7 – "Research concluding noncompetes stifle workers forthcoming in multiple publications" summarizes a series of forthcoming publications co-authored by management professor Evan Starr.

BizEd Magazine – Dec. 2 – "Pivoting in a Panic" reports a Center for Social Value Creation initiative as one of three selections for the MBA Roundtable's 2020 Fast Track Curriculum Innovation Awards: [Maryland Smith] took home the prize for Other Innovation for its impact consulting fellowship. Twenty-three teams, each consisting of two master's students and three undergraduates, were placed with University of Maryland alumni to provide pro bono consulting for two months during the pandemic. The consulting opportunity was made available to nonprofit organizations, B Corporations, and for-profit impact-driven organizations. [The MBA Roundtable's] Award winners were evaluated on their levels of creativity, the uniqueness of their solutions, the speed at which they implemented their innovations, their resourcefulness in using existing tools or working within budgetary constraints, the innovation's impact on students, the level of engagement across the university, and the repeatability and scalability of the initiatives.

InvestorPlace – Dec. 2 – "Lordstown Motors Is Another Risky Bet" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: U.S. President-elect Joe Biden may further support the "increasing government initiatives for promotion of e-mobility" and the quick transition to electrification in private and public vehicles soon. After all, as [Kass] wrote … "Climate change will be a major focus of a Biden Administration."

24/7 Custom Broker News – Dec. 1 – In "How Will We Distribute the COVID-19 Vaccine?" Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya lays out the challenges of creating an end-to-end supply chain that can produce and distribute millions of doses of a vaccine for COVID-19.

U2b (Education for Careers) – Dec. 2 – "Top business schools in the US are going test-optional in 2021" quotes Senior Director of the Full-Time MBA and Specialty Master's Programs Pasquale Quintero: "The GMAT or GRE is an important assessment, but we review candidates holistically. We will take into consideration academic history, work experience, industry certifications, and other factors that will strengthen one's application."

November 2020

Politico – Nov. 30 – "How climate change could spark the next home mortgage disaster" quotes Professor of the PracticeClifford Rossi: It just has not reached that level of concern. And it never does, right?" [Rossi] told POLITICO. "It never reaches the point of people really kind of being forward-thinking about this until the crisis is upon you or about to hit you in the face." … The idea is to relieve taxpayers of the risk of having to cover for potential losses, putting it on private investors instead. But that solution can only work for so long, especially given the pressure investors have put on the mortgage giants to remove loans on properties at risk of climate change from those offerings, said Rossi, the former Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac risk officer… Rossi called the letter "a clarion call" that investors were skeptical of the risks the mortgage giants were taking on from climate-exposed properties — so Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac took the loans out of the credit risk transfer pool, he said, letting climate-vulnerable mortgages pile up on their own books. "In a still relatively low-risk environment relative to the rest of their portfolio they can get by pulling those loans out and putting them aside," Rossi said. "But over time, that's going to pose challenges for them."

Maryland Today – Nov. 30 – Associate Professor of Management Vijaya Venkataramani gives advice in "Don't Skip the Holiday Office Party This Year."

TalkMarkets – Nov. 28 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives a "Year-To-Date Performance Of 7 Largest Stocks [for] Saturday, Nov. 28."

New York Magazine – Nov. 25 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang discusses "How Shopping Malls Can Survive the Pandemic" as part of the magazine's "What is Even Happening" video series.

Baltimore Sun – Nov. 25 – Editorial "Keep toilet paper off your shopping list this Black Friday (and beyond)" quotes Amna Kirmani, Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Marketing: People buy toilet paper to ease their anxiety, but then toilet paper sells out, and people get frustrated and emotional and worried about toilet paper running out — a problem they helped create. So an action that initially comforts us, ends up doing the exact opposite. "This is not a rational behavior," says [Kirmani]. "This is based on fear. It is emotional; it is a gut reaction."

TecHR Series – Nov. 25 – "Management Researcher Gives 4 Ways to Refocus on Remote Teams Amid Second COVID Wave" features insights from management professor and department chair Kathryn Bartol, drawn from her recent research… Related coverage via Maryland Today's "Four things we miss when working remotely" (Nov. 16).

CBS News (online) – Nov. 24 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang is the lone expert source in "How Will COVID Affect Black Friday Sales? Stores 'Significantly Scaling Back,' Says Expert." … Related video: "Jie Zhang talks about retail and the impact of COVID-19," via CGTN America (Nov. 24)

Science NewsNet – Nov 20 – "AI Leadership for Healthcare Certificate Program Forthcoming from Maryland Smith" previews an 18-week long, fully online certificate program requiring no IT programming experience and is designed to provide a full perspective of the business of healthcare: "In an intimate, cohort environment, participants will experience hands-on AI exercises guided by award-winning research experts," says Christine Thompson, executive director of Maryland Smith's Executive Education division, which is administering the new program. "Our hybrid learning model is ideal for working professionals. It blends live, virtual sessions and self-paced content."

BusinessBecause – Nov. 19 – "Female Representation In MBA Classrooms Better Than Ever In 2020" reports on a fall 2020 Forte Foundation study citing Maryland Smith among its member schools as "best business schools for women" – representing "top MBA programs in the US, Europe and Canada": A record eight of these schools reported 45% or more women were enrolled in their 2020 MBA programs."

Science NewsNet – Nov. 19 – "New Study: GAAP Earnings as Predictor of Job Gains, Layoffs" features research by accounting professor Rebecca Hann.

Baltimore Sun – Nov. 18 – 'Is there another toilet paper shortage?' quotes Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd III: Consumers tend to place higher values on items that are scarce or are perceived to be scarce, and are reacting to that, said [Boyd]. "There are a lot of folks out there who know an item is in high demand — paper towels, cleaning supplies, toilet paper — who think 'I have to stockpile, just in case." … To prevent panic buying, stores should assure consumers that supply lines are fine. But that won't be enough for some people, he said. Some will feel that, "I don't know if I trust authority figures, and I don't want to be left in the lurch, so I better stockpile," he said. Boyd added that he doesn't expect panic buying to rise to the levels it did in the spring. "I'd like to think that since we've been through this before, we'll be a little more calm. We might see a rise in panic buying, but not like before. Life will go on."

Maryland Daily Record – Nov. 18 – "As others struggle, home improvement industries soar" quotes Roland Rust, David Bruce Smith chair in marketing: This isn't the first time a national recession has boosted some industries despite damaging most others. During the Great Depression, "the companies that sold shoes weren't doing as well, (but) the shoe repair shops did great," said [Rust]… Rust notes that "artificial" boosts like this one rarely last long; he references the statistical concept of regression to the mean, which is the idea that things are more likely to return to normal than they are to continue being exceptional.

Business Insider – Nov. 17 – "Warren Buffett appears to be buying a secret stock that could be revealed within weeks" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "He is undoubtedly building a large position now and may reveal it in his next 13F," [Kass] told Business Insider. "Buffett has received confidentiality treatment several times in the past… I believe most recently around 2015 he was building a position in Phillips 66." … Related pieces quoting Kass: Seeking Alpha's "Berkshire Hathaway loads up on pharma, trims bank holdings: 13F" (Nov. 16), Benzinga's "Has Warren Buffett Invested In Tesla? Here's Why People Are Speculating" (Nov. 18) and Pinnacle Digest's "What Makes America Great?" (Nov. 16).

The Business Monthly – Nov. 17 – "[Maryland Smith] to spotlight COVID-persevering companies" describes the Center for Global Business' Maryland Business Adapts 20/21 initiative.

Civil Eats – Nov. 16 – "Happy Meals Could Get Healthier Under a Proposed Maryland Law" quotes Logistics, Business and Public Policy Chair Martin Dresner: Despite McDonald's success, not all food retail businesses are benefiting during the pandemic, according to [Dresner]. "There's certainly been winners and losers in the restaurant industry [during] the pandemic; I think a lot of these independent operations are really hurting." … While some national chains are "doing quite well," especially those with delivery services in-place, Dresner said local food establishments have been struggling to survive. Dresner considers this situation as "the 'McDonald's problem,'" in that national chains are not in favor of local mandates that create potential disruptions to their ongoing operations. "They are national chains, and they have national operations. They like to roll out products [on] at least a regional but [ideally] a national basis; so, if you have individual counties with different mandates, and I think that complicates their supply chain." … Dresner also mentioned that if McDonald's is required to offer more healthy meal options that end up not being popular, the company could find itself in a bind. "If they weren't creative enough to come up with some healthy options that people wanted, they would end up with probably excess inventory."

Poets & Quants – Nov. 15 – "Online MBA programs with the best salary outcomes" notes Maryland Smith as ranking third globally in terms of alumni reporting their degree positively impacting their professional career trajectories.

Authority Magazine – Nov. 14 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan describes 'The Future of Retail in The Post Pandemic World.'

Maryland Daily Record – Nov. 13 – Maryland Smith's Center for Global Business announces a 'Maryland Business Adapts' initiative' to highlight companies persevering through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Business Insider – Nov. 11 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass is the lone-expert source in "Warren Buffett likely sold $4 billion of Apple shares and dumped more Wells Fargo stock last quarter, Berkshire Hathaway expert David Kass says." Related: Kass guest blogs "Five highlights of Berkshire Hathaway third quarter report," via TalkMarkets (Nov. 7).

Psychology Today – Nov. 10 – "We May Be More Adaptive Than We Think" features management professor Trevor Foulk's 'Getting Back to the 'New Normal' research that tracked a group of employees at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Find MBA – Nov. 10 – Julie Neill, Office of Career Services assistant director, comments in "Employers Warm to Online MBAs in Coronavirus Pandemic": "The fact is that graduates receive the same MBA degree and diploma from the institution regardless of the format," [Neill] says. "What does matter greatly, though, is the reputation of the institution which grants the degree and of course, its accreditation."

Appraisal Buzz – Nov. 9 – "Compliance is the Cornerstone of a Sound Housing Finance System" previews a panel discussion featuring Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi.

Poets&Quants – Nov. 9 – Maryland Smith is ranked No. 13 among the Best Online MBA Programs in 2021.

InvestorPlace – Nov. 6 – "Alibaba stock temps ahead of likely Biden victory" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "It is clearly in China's interest, and that of the rest of the world, for a President Biden to restore U.S.-China relations to the less confrontational approach that preceded President Trump. President Biden is likely to form a coalition with our trading partners in Europe and then confront China in a less hostile fashion and be better able to negotiate our differences from a position of greater strength. The tariffs that President Trump introduced would likely be eliminated or substantially reduced. The level of international trade would then increase to the benefit of consumers in all countries that were impacted by the Trump tariffs..." … Related InvestorPlace piece quoting Kass: "7 Chinese Stocks To Buy Even If Trade Tension Persists" (Nov. 11).

Medical Xpress – Nov. 6 – "Here's how to improve packaged foods nutrition" overviews research, "Competitive Effects of Front-of-Package Nutrition Labeling Adoption on Nutritional Quality: Evidence from Facts Up Front Style Labels," co-authored by Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan.

SupplyChainBrain – Nov. 5 – Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya answers "How will we distribute the COVID-19 Vaccine?" … Related: Acharya contributes to E-Commerce Times' "AI's Potential to Manage the Supply Chain" (Oct. 30).

The Maritime Executive – Nov. 4 – Director of Military and Veterans Affairs Frank Goertner writes 'The Navy needs to start building its future.' … Previous Goertner op-ed, via The Rainey Center: "National Security Strategy Must Include Diversity."

The Hill's Changing America – Nov. 3 – Assistant Dean of the Full-Time MBA Program and Associate Clinical Professor of Management and Organization Nicole Coomber writes "How we can Stop COVID-19's Diversity Brain Drain."

Legal Theory – Nov. 2 – Blog post previews a forthcoming paper on 'Constitutional limits on public pension reform' by business law professors Leigh Anenson and Jennifer Gershberg.

Business Insider – Nov. 2 – 'Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Swung from extreme caution to a flurry of deals' (Paywall) quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass … Republished at Economynews.info.

Business Because – Nov. 2 – "MBA vs. (specialty) Master's" highlights Maryland Smith: [Maryland Smith] offers eight specialized masters programs, across topics like business and marketing analytics, as well as finance, accounting, and supply chain management. Five of those are STEM-designated, meaning international students can stay and find work in the US without an H-1B visa. On Smith's STEM-designated Master of Science in Business Analytics, students dive into the technical—going beyond what would be covered on a traditional MBA—learning programming languages like Python and SQL. Smith runs its business master's programs alongside a thriving full-time MBA, but the University of Leicester School of Business in the UK decided to shelve its full-time MBA program completely.

October 2020

Wall Street Journal – Oct. 29 – "Election Tests Companies' Policies on Social Media, Political Speech" quotes Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi:Corporate codes of conduct and social media policies are hardly a cure-all for the challenges posed by the increasing polarization of political views among Americans, but with companies increasingly sensitive to reputational risks, experts say it would behoove [Rossi] said the consequences for not doing so are increasingly severe. "Awareness and sensitivity is really what this is about. "That's how you manage this risk: Make people more aware of their actions and the consequences."

Forbes – Oct. 29 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph Lamone Chair and Professor in Strategy and Entrepreneurship, writes "Three Myths that Undercut the Antitrust Case Against Google." … Previous Agarwal-Forbes column: "Fail Fast but use Scientific Method to Minimize Fallout' (Oct. 19).

The Business Monthly – Oct. 27 – An overview of Maryland Business: Rebooted is republished online in "University Retools to help Business Survive and Prosper."

US Supply Chain Management Council News – Oct. 25 – "Global Supply Chain Exposure and Vulnerability to Increasing Climate Extremes" previews a Center for Financial Policy Center-hosted panel discussion led by Research Professor Sandor Boyson and CFP Director Russell Wermers.

MarketWatch – October 23 – Logistics Business and Public Policy Associate Professor Cristian Dezsö comments extensively in "Here's why women fund managers regularly outperform men, based on newer research." … Republished by The Wealth Advisor.

Seeking Alpha – Oct. 23 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "SPACs – Why Investors Should Be Cautious."

Lifewire – Oct 22 – PepsiCo Chaired Professor of Consumer Science Michel Wedel is the primary expert source for "Where did Quibi go wrong?"

InvestorPlace – Oct. 22 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass contributes to "Presidential Debate Live Updates: Key Investing Takeaways": "Assuming Joe Biden is elected, and the Democrats have a majority in both houses of Congress, then investments in infrastructure stocks (or infrastructure ETFs) should receive a high priority. Climate related opportunities in solar and wind power, batteries for electric vehicles, and electric vehicle manufacturers should be explored." … Related pre-election InvestorPlace pieces quoting Kass: "Election stocks to buy with bipartisan strength" (Nov. 2), "4 REITs to Buy for A Post-Election Biden Victory Bump" (Nov.2), "5 Industries Biden Would Destroy as President" (Nov. 2), "3 Stocks to Buy no Matter the Election Results" (Nov. 3) and"Landcadia Holdings II Isn't Insulated from the Coronavirus" (Nov. 3)

HousingWire – Oct. 21 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes "The CFP Missed a Chance to Fix the QM Rule." … Related: Rossi contributes to The Mortgage Reports' "How to Make Lenders Compete for Your Mortgage Rate" (Oct. 21).

Phys.org – Oct. 19 – "Save it or spend it? Advertising decisions amid consumer word-of-mouth" overviews a Marketing Science-published study, 'When Consumers Learn, Money Burns,' co-authored by Associate Professor of Marketing Yogesh Joshi.

USA Today – Oct. 16 – "Trump, Biden shower ad money on Phoenix, Philadelphia, Florida's I-4 corridor in final stretch" quotes research ("The Air War versus the Ground Game: An Analysis of Multi-Channel Marketing in U.S. Presidential Elections") co-authored by Assistant Professor of Marketing Lingling Zhang.

Bloomberg – Oct. 16 – "Buffett Inches Toward Wells Fargo Exit as Scharf Sets Course" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "Clearly Warren Buffett has less confidence in the future course at Wells Fargo, in the perhaps future expected performance of its stock," [Kass] said in an interview. "He may perceive that there's a lot more risk than he originally foresaw."

Barron's – Oct. 16 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass writes, "To the Editor: Taxing Capital Gains": Concerns about the potential impact on U.S. equity prices resulting from Joe Biden's proposal to tax capital gains at higher ordinary-income rates can be mitigated by noting that this would apply only to incomes above $1 million ("Nothing Worries This Stock Market—Not Even a Possible Tax Hike," Up & Down Wall Street, Oct. 9). Also, though tax-optimization strategies for high-income individuals could result in asset selling prior to the tax increase going into effect, the shares sold could be quickly repurchased while establishing a higher cost basis. The 30-day "wash sale" rule that applies to realized losses does not apply to capital gains.

Phys.org – Oct. 13 – "How consumers responded to COVID-19" overviews new research by Professor of Marketing Amna Kirmani.

Forbes – Oct. 12 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments extensively in "Here's The No. 1 Reason People Don't Refinance Their Mortgages," includingThe No. 1 reason survey respondents said they have chosen not to refinance is that "they're not sure it's worth it." Some 34% of survey respondents gave that answer. There are many reasons why homeowners might feel refinancing isn't worth it. Among them is "borrower burnout," [says Rossi].

Science NewsNet – Oct. 12 – "The Pandemic is Pushing Women, People of Color out of their Careers" features analysis and commentary by Nicole Coomber, assistant dean of the Full-Time MBA program and an associate clinical professor of management.

FIND MBA – Oct. 9 – Assistant Dean for Part-time MBA and Online Programs Clinical Professor of Strategy Paulo Prochno contributes extensively to "The Ingredients that make a great online MBA," including: [Prochno] says that "synchronous" live sessions are essential to a good Online MBA. "An MBA program is about learning new skills, but it's also about increasing self-awareness, learning how to collaborate more effectively, exchanging knowledge with peers and building a professional network." His students meet virtually twice a week to attend lively synchronous sessions. Most faculty use breakout rooms for small-group discussions, "allowing students to have an experience similar to being in a face-to-face environment."

Maryland Today – Oct. 9 – Marketing professor Jie Zhang explains "Five Pandemic Lessons for Shoppers." . . . The Real Deal (NY real estate news) quotes Zhang in "The American mall: A survival guide."

Maryland Today – Oct. 7 – "Just Don't Call It 'Adulting'" describes a new course co-developed by Associate Professor of Management Cynthia Stevens, devoting 40-50% to financial literacy and the rest to helping students figure out their general goals and values…"

AlphaBetaStock – Oct. 5 – "Why Did Apple Stock Split?" references Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Kass argues that stock splitting was a practice used by companies to keep their stock prices in the mid double-digit range. Moreover, companies did this as often as possible because broker commissions were fixed, and investors preferred trading in "round lots" of 100 shares. In contrast, if an investor purchased less than 100 shares, broker commissions were amplified, the reason behind holding "round lots." . . . Related: Kass guest blogs "Year-To-Date Performance Of 5 Largest Stocks" at Talk Markets (Oct. 2)

Top MBA – Oct. 5 – "Business Schools Go Test-Optional for 2021 MBA Applications": quotes Pasquale Quintero, senior director of full-time MBA and specialized master's programs: "We decided to continue our test waiver policy to make it easier for qualified candidates to apply to our MBA programs. When we announced our temporary GMAT/GRE waiver in April, in response to the pandemic, we saw an increase in applications from very qualified individuals."It's highly likely many of our applicants would have not applied to our MBA programs, putting their career objectives on hold."

Science NewsNet – Oct. 5 – "Webinar Series: Investors and ESG" previews a Center for Financial Policy hosted series to explore the Environmental, Social and Corporate Governance (ESG) questions that are increasingly pressing for organizations and investors: "The Center for Financial Policy is uniquely positioned to tackle these issues because of our longstanding relationships with the regulatory community and proximity to Washington, D.C.," said [series moderator Russell Wermers]. "The COVID-19 crisis has underscored the connections between environmental, social and corporate governance factors, and a general unpreparedness to handle major disruptions, such as the ones that are expected to result from climate change. The timing for this series and these discussions."

Market Realist – Oct. 3 – 'What is Warren Buffett Buying?' quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "The number one lesson to be derived from Warren Buffett's investment career is to have a long-time horizon of at least 10 years and be patient." . . . Related: Kass contributes stock market-based insights to InvestorPlace "live blog" coverage of both the vice presidential debate (Oct. 7) and presidential debate (Sept. 29).

Maryland Today – Oct. 1– "Why Critics Don't Pan Blockbusters … At Least Not Right Away" overviews research by management professorDavid Waguespack.

September 2020

Washington Business Journal – Sept. 29 – "UMD Business School Names New Dean" covers the appointment, effective in January 2021, of Prabhudev Konana as Dean of the Robert H. Smith School of Business. . . . Related coverage via Poets & Quants, BizEd Magazine, others.

Maryland Daily Record – Sept. 29 "McCormick, with strong Q3 numbers, announces stock split" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Although the stock split, which takes effect Nov. 30, might send a positive signal to shareholders, it doesn't add any real value, [said Kass.] "It's really a cosmetic change. It doesn't create any value; you're just cutting the pie into two pieces and the pie is still the same size." The split could create excitement among customers and potentially attract new shareholders, but the customer effect is minor, although psychologically the shareholder may feel "richer." Kass pointed to recent examples of Apple and Tesla, where shares skyrocketed after a 4-for-1 and a 5-for-1 split, respectively.

TODAY (Singapore) – Sept. 26 – "Can SIA Fly High Again?" quotes Logistics, Business and Public Policy Chair Martin Dresner: [Dresner] noted that given the perceived dangers of air travel currently, "passengers may prefer direct flights to their destinations, rather than connecting routes through a hub such as Singapore." …But a full recovery for SIA, especially for its long-haul flights, will come slowly. Business travellers are less willing to be paying more for premium seats amid a global recession and may curtail business travel entirely, said Prof Dresner.

Maryland Daily Record – Sept. 25 – "UMD Smith School to host free digital marketing series" previews a three-part free webinar series led by Associate Clinical Professor of Marketing Mary Harms as part of Maryland Business: Rebooted.

The Hill – Sept. 25 – "On Tap Next Week" notes the September 29 Center for Financial Policy-hosted webinar "Financial Stability and Data: Minding the Gaps with Randal Quarles and Darrell Duffie."

Forbes – Sept. 22 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph Lamone Chair and Professor in Strategy and Entrepreneurship, writes "Why A Big Government Cure Would Be Worse Than Big Tech Control."

InvestorPlace – Sept. 22 – "How to Find Undervalued Companies" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "I would focus on the PEG ratio, or P/E ratio divided by the projected growth rate of earnings per share... "The lower the PEG ratio, the more attractive (or undervalued) a stock is."

American Banker – Sept. 21 – "Results-driven Fraser just the ticket for fixing Citi, associates say" quotes and references Clifford Rossi: Fraser's blend of experiences should serve her well atop a company that today operates in more than 90 countries. Clifford Rossi, who met Fraser when he was chief risk officer for Citi's consumer lending group, said she "has a strategic vision, she knows the business very well and she's able to execute." ...That knack for strategic thinking will be particularly important for Citi's CEO in the current economic environment, since low interest rates are crimping bank's profit margins, Rossi said.

BusinessBecause – Sept. 21 – Research Professor and Center for Global Business Academic Director Kislaya Prasad comments throughout "How TikTok's Turmoil Could Change the Course of Big Tech," Including: The issue is that tech giants have monopolized the market, but monopolization is often baked into the very premise of social media apps. "Facebook becomes more valuable if there are lots of people on it, as does TikTok. Big tech will want free movement of data with no constraints at all," which is at direct odds with increasing government concerns over data protection.

The Business Monthly – Sept. 20 – "Maryland Business Rebooted: University retools to help business survive and prosper" overviews the initiative and includes insights from various participants including Maryland Smith leaders Distinguished University Professor Michel Wedel and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies Victor Mullins.

Credit Union Today – Sept. 20 – CUES to Host Directors & Dialogue December Seriespreviews a series to include"How Does an Agile Board Deal with Wellness, Mental Health, and Anxiety?" presented by Maryland Smith finance lecturer Joe Perfetti.

The Education Magazine – Sept. 17 – "Maryland Smith Offers Free Business Education Program to Maryland Residents, Businesses"overviews Maryland Business: Rebooted, the free webinar series developed and presented by Maryland Smith in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Forbes – Sept. 15 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph Lamone Chair and Professor in Strategy and Entrepreneurship, writes "Why Amazon Outhustles Comcast: A Tale Of Two Monopolies And Implications For Their Customers." Previous Agarwal-Forbes column: "Maintaining Organizational Soul While Onboarding In A Remote World" (Sept. 8)

American Marketing Association News – Sept. 15 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan co-authors "4 Reasons to Adopt Front-of-Package Nutrition Labels" based on his new research in the Journal of Marketing to help curb diet-related chronic diseases that burden the U.S. economy.

American Journal of Transportation – Sept. 14 – "The Redefining of 'Intermodal': quotes Associate Professor of Logistics Management Philip Evers: "Two or more modes being involved in the transportation [of goods] is becoming more and more the case," said [Evers]. "Because of the changes in distribution, because of the inherent efficiencies or services of the different modes of transportation." What's more, Evers believes, present-day intermodal traffic "blurs some of those traditional lines" between modes of transportation that better handle large shipments and those that emphasize smaller shipments, explained Evers. Today's "e-commerce phenomenon really puts the emphasis on small shipments," he said.

Baltimore Sun – Sept. 14 – "'Ghost kitchens' thrive in Baltimore area during coronavirus pandemic as customers avoid sit-down restaurants" quotes Anil K. Gupta, Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship: Operators may lease space in a centralized kitchen, allowing them to forego the many costs and risks associated with opening a sit-down restaurant. It's a model that's seen "crazy growth" since the beginning of the pandemic, with traditional restaurants closed and rapidly expanding appetites for delivery food, says [Gupta]… Gupta says that's not necessarily the case. He predicted continued growth in the delivery and ghost kitchen market into 2021, even after the pandemic is over... "In capitalism, whenever you have some winners, you end up having some losers."

GARP News – Sept. 11 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes: "Defaults, Delinquencies and Credit Losses: The Potential of Impact of Rising Hurricanes on Mortgage Risk."

900 CHML radio (Hamilton, Ontario) – Sept. 11 – "It's been 19 years since 9/11, Elinda Kiss is a survivor" features Clinical Associate Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss recounting the attacks of 9/11 at ground zero.

Bloomberg Radio – Sept. 10 – "Ritu Agarwal Discusses 'Two Pandemics'" gives insight to Maryland Smith's responses to Covid-19 and racial injustice.

Consumer Affairs – Sept. 10 – "Mall owners step In to purchase bankrupt JCPenney" quotes Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang: "Part of it is the public psyche," [said Zhang]. "This virus is likely not going to go away any time soon, and the one type of place where people will be much more vigilant about avoiding in the longer term will be those crowded, enclosed spaces. And that's exactly what traditional shopping malls are." … Related: Multibriefs' 'Retailer Survival' (Sep.t 10) extensively quotes Zhang.

Communications of the ACM – Sept. 10 – "Anticipating the Feeling Economy" overviews research by Distinguished University Professor Roland Rust that shows workers with emotional intelligence will be highly prized as artificial intelligence continues to proliferate.

Harvard Business Review – Sept. 10 – Assistant Professor of Management Trevor Foulk co-authors "Restore Your Sense of Control — Despite the Pandemic," based on recent research.

WalletHub – Sept. 9 – In "Ask the Experts," Associate Clinical Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss gives personal finance advice on credit card balance transfer offers.

Analytics – Sept. 8 – Smith Chair of Management Science Michael Fu co-authors "Virtual 2020 INFORMS Annual Meeting has something for everyone" as a preview for the Nov. 7-13 inaugural Virtual INFORMS Annual Meeting, which Fu is co-chairing.

Business Insider – Sept. 7 – "Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway cuts Wells Fargo stake to 17-year low" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Buffett may be cutting his exposure to Wells Fargo because of the reputational damage caused by its fake-accounts scandal and the lending limits imposed on it by federal regulators in 2018, [Kass] told Business Insider last month.

Washington Business Journal – Sept. 4 – "The MBA Reboot" quotes Interim Dean Ritu Agarwal: At [Maryland Smith], the number of students who reported being of color doubled from 2002 to 2018. I[Agarwal] said that stems from an active effort that includes partnerships with the Forté Foundation, National Black MBA Association, National Hispanic MBA Association and historically Black colleges and universities. It also runs summer high school programs tailored to students of color. "I don't think as a business school we are doing our job or executing on our mission if we are not training the type of workforce that organizations need," she said. "We've put in place practices that help us get the most diverse and talented student population." …Flexibility on how one goes back to school to get a business degree is a major market demand, said Agarwal. The College Park university already has a flexible online and part-time MBA program, which allows for in-person and online classes. For the 2021 school year, it will launch "flex" versions of its other specialty master's programs. These plans were always in the works, Agarwal said, but Covid-19 has accelerated them.

GARP News – Sept. 4 – "CROs Ponder Risk in Uncertain Times" quotes Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi: Indeed, CROs are expected to carry a certain stoicism, and to offer steady leadership during the worst of times, explained [Rossi]. "You rarely see them let their guard down," Rossi added.

The Hill-Changing America – Sept. 3 – Associate Professor of Business and Public Policy Rachelle Sampson and PhD student Nathan Barrymore co-author "If Black Lives Matter, Transfer Your Leadership Team."

International Business Times – Sept. 3 – "US Stocks Plunge, As High-Flying Nasdaq, S&P 500 Take Breather From Historic Six-Month Rally" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: [Kass] characterized Thursday's drop as "a periodic correction that generally occurs when equity markets have been rising rapidly." … Also at IBTimes, Kass explains implications for the U.S. economy in Brexit: As Britain And EU Trade Talks Stall, Chances Of No Deal Loom Larger" (Sept. 2).

August 2020

Bloomberg – Aug. 31 – "Buffett Hunts Abroad With $6 Billion Wager on Japanese Firms" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "I think this is a definite signal that Berkshire is more likely to examine and pursue potential investments internationally…This could be the beginning of the tip of an iceberg. There could be many more investments such as this" …While the bets are valued at more than $6 billion, they represent just a sliver, about 4%, of Berkshire's total cash pile. But the wagers underscore that Buffett sees value in Japanese stocks, according to Kass. Berkshire's investment comes as global investors have pulled $43 billion from Japanese stocks this year in favor of high-flying U.S. technology shares and other companies viewed as more resilient to economic turmoil.

International Business Times – Aug. 31 – "End Of Coal? More Banks Plan To Phase Out Financing Of Coal-Related Businesses": [Kass said that other large banks such as JP Morgan Chase (JPM) also plan to curb loans to coal firms. "The increasing focus by activists and elected officials on global warming and climate change has resulted in pressure being applied to banks to curtail their financial relationships with coal firms," he said. "As a result, more banks are likely to follow the example set by JPMorgan Chase. Coal emissions have contributed significantly to this environmental problem. The anticipated rapid growth in alternative energy sources that are renewable and environmentally friendly will likely hasten the decline of the coal industry." … Also at IBTimes, 'S&P riding high on Spring-Summer rally' (Aug. 30) extensively quotes Kass.

Wall Street Journal – Aug. 28 – "From 'Freezer Farms' to Jets, Logistics Operators Prepare for a Covid-19 Vaccine" quotes Research Professor Sandor Boyson: "There's going to be a real need to engage the collective capacity that exists out there," said [Boyson].

eCampus News – Aug. 28 – Henry C. Lucas, Robert H. Smith Professor of Information Systems Emeritus. writes "Is face-to-face learning better than online learning?"

DC Velocity – Aug. 28 – Associate Professor of Supply Chain Management Philip Evers discusses "What's Next for the USPS" in a Logistics Matters podcast.

US News & World Report – Aug. 28 – "What Happens to the Stock Market if Biden Wins?" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Lower drug prices, at least when it comes to Medicare, are a crystal clear priority for the Democratic nominee. Medicare is the federal health care insurance program for people aged 65 and older, and for those with certain disabilities. "The Biden plan will repeal the existing law explicitly barring Medicare from negotiating lower prices with drug corporations," the campaign site reads. "This in turn might lead to lower profits for pharmaceutical companies and lower share prices," Kass says. Related: Arkansas Business' "Trump vs. Biden, and What It All Means to Investors" (Sept. 14) quotes Kass.

Appraisal Buzz – Aug. 26 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi discusses Collateral Risk Education.

International Business Times – Aug. 26 – "Despite Incurring Huge Losses, Exxon, Chevron, BP, And Other Oil Giants Still Pay Dividends" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: [Kass said] large oil companies such as Exxon Mobil and Chevron are paying dividends in large part to provide support for their share prices. "The current 8.5% dividend being paid by Exxon Mobil indicates that the market is expecting a dividend reduction…Chevron's 6% dividend, likewise, supporting its stock price, appears to be less vulnerable to a reduction." ...

Science Newsnet – Aug. 26 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi explains why "A new flood risk database for homeowners lacks reliability."

Find MBA – Aug. 26 – Office of Career Services Assistant Director Erika Harrigan contributes to "Digital degrees can help students collaborate with and lead teams remotely, boosting their employability."

AARP the Magazine – Aug. 26 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass contributes to "Warren Buffett Is Still Making Money — and Giving It Away — at 90."

The Mortgage Reports – Aug. 25 – "More homeowners should be using this refinance strategy," extensively quotes Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi.

Forbes – Aug. 24 Forbes, "Indian H-1B Visa Holders Again Show They Are Not 'Cheap Labor" cites research by Henry C. Lucas, Robert H. Smith Professor of Information Systems Emeritus: Economic research shows the legal requirement on salaries and the functioning of the U.S. labor market has resulted in H-1B visa holders overall being paid comparable to or higher than U.S. professionals with similar experience... [Lucas] examined the skills and compensation of over 50,000 IT professionals in the United States and found foreign-born professionals in information technology (IT) earned more than their native counterparts.

Seeking Alpha – Aug.23 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass writes: "Berkshire Hathaway Is Undervalued By 20%." Also published by Talk Markets, others.

Business Insider – Aug. 21 – 'Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway has scored an $86 billion gain on Apple' quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Apple's surging valuation has made it a disproportionately large part of Berkshire's business. For example, Berkshire's Apple stake is worth more than four times as much the second-biggest holding in its stock portfolio, a $26 billion position in Bank of America. Apple now makes up about 50% of the portfolio's entire value, finance professor David Kass tweeted.

Fortune – Aug. 21 – Research Professor and Center for Global Business Academic Director Kislaya Prasad writes "The Chinese and U.S. Internets are drifting apart. Why that's bad for the whole world."

NBC News – Aug. 19 – 'Apple Now Worth $2 Trillion' quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "Apple's $2 trillion valuation represents about 10 percent of GDP for the U.S. and about 7 percent of the S&P 500...Its iPhone is ubiquitous. It has transformed the way we live. Its ecosystem is self-sustaining." … Related: InvestorPlace (via Business insider) quotes Kass from the NBC report in "3 Tech Stocks Still Leading the Charge" (Aug. 25).

Housing Wire – Aug. 18 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes: "Why a credit reporting moratorium during COVID-19 will harm consumers."

Fast Company – Aug. 15 – "Asking this question during an interview can wreck your shot at getting the job" focuses on Associate Professor of Management and Organization Rellie Derfler-Rozin's "Motivation Purity Bias" paper.

U.S. News & World Report – Aug. 14 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass contributes to "What is Earnings Per Share?": A faster growth rate of EPS would justify a higher P/E," says [Kass]…The PEG is a better measure than just the P/E ratio to determine whether a stock is undervalued, fairly valued or overvalued, Kass says. "A lower relative PEG ratio may indicate a company is undervalued."

Bloomberg – Aug. 14 – "Berkshire Switches Bets on Banks, Adds Wager on Barrick Gold" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: The second-quarter stock moves are consistent with Buffett's "extremely cautious" outlook expressed at this year's shareholders meeting, [Kass said]. "He's showing extreme caution by basically lightening up on his major banking investments except for Bank of America." Kass called the Barrick investment "the biggest shock" from Friday's filing, and suggested that the size means it could be a stake made by Combs or Weschler. "Still, you would think they would share Warren Buffett's skeptical philosophy of investing in gold, which he's expressed at several annual meetings as well as his letters to shareholders…Yet this suddenly shows up in his portfolio, almost as a hedge against possible bad times."

The Real Deal – Aug. 12 – "Fear and loathing in a pandemic: Insurers battle business interruption claims" quotes Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi: "If you have a very business friendly court, it might look at a broader view of whether this should be covered," said [Rossi]. "This is no slam dunk for the insurance companies."

InvestorPlace – Aug. 12 – "5 Great Warren Buffett Stocks to Buy Now" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: But, keep in mind that Buffett's plays work best as long-term investments rather than short-term trades. As [Kass] said in an email to InvestorPlace: "The number one lesson to be derived from Warren Buffett's investment career is to have a long-time horizon of at least 10 years and be patient." With this in mind, the names in Buffett's portfolio today may not shoot up in the next few weeks, quarters or even months. But, over the long haul, they could produce strong returns for your portfolio… Related: Kass guest blogs'Berkshire Portfolio Investment, StoneCo Ltd., Up 12% on Takeover Talks' at ValueWalk (Aug. 11)

Forbes – Aug. 10 – Rudolph Lamone Chair and Professor in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal writes "Tired Of Covid-19 Chaos? Blame Too Much Regulation, Not Too Much Freedom" and, previously, "Instead Of Open Or Closed, Dial Your Mind To Active" (July 21).

InvestorPlace – Aug. 9 – "9 Top Robinhood Stocks You May Want to Avoid" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: [Kass] explained in an email to InvestorPlace, "Robinhood has introduced trading in stocks, ETFs, and options to a new generation of young investors in their 20's and 30's by providing these services without charging any commissions or fees. As a result of offering investors the opportunity to invest in fractional shares with as little as $1, the world of investing in equities has been democratized such that virtually everyone can participate."

Forbes – Aug. 7 – "Should I buy an electric car or hybrid now" quotes Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch: …Kirsch, author of the book The Electric Vehicle and the Burden of History, says experts have predicted a breakthrough for EVs since the 1960s. "The success of Tesla's Model 3 may have finally broken the dam holding back final demand for EVs," he says. "Tesla's stock has been on a tear, quintupling since late 2019. As of mid-2020, the company's market capitalization exceeds that of the next three most valuable car companies combined. Regardless of its long-term performance, the Tesla narrative has clearly carried the day."

The Hill – Aug. 6 – Director of Military and Veteran Affairs Frank Goertner writes op-ed "What matters most in naming U.S. bases."

Science NewsNet – Aug. 6 – "How Technological, Socioeconomic and Geopolitical Forces are Altering Everything We Know about Marketing" overviews marketing professor Roland Rust's research, "The Future of Marketing," published in the International Journal of Research in Marketing.

Clear Admit – Aug. 6 – Senior Director of the Full-Time MBA and Specialty Master's Programs Pasquale Quintero discusses Maryland Smith graduate programs in an "Admissions Director Q&A."

Online MBA Report – Aug. 5 – Online MBA students Adetoun Olumide and Daniel Mazour are recognized and profiled in "Business Leaders of Tomorrow – 2020."

Ladders – Aug. 5 – 'People can adapt to the new normal very quickly' reviews research by management professor Trevor Foulk. Related coverage in Psych Central Sense of Normalcy Can Bounce Back Quickly, Even During Continued Stress (Aug. 6) and at Scienmag, others.

Brookings – Aug. 4 – William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance Lemma Senbet recommends Joshua Gans' "Economics in the Age of COVID-19" as part of "A social distancing reading list from the Brookings Africa Growth Initiative."

Business Because – Aug. 4 – "STEM-Designated Masters Bring New Hope For US Business Schools" references Maryland Smith's STEM-designated masters programs in marketing analytics, business analytics, information systems, and supply chain management... Related BusinessBecause: "MBA Vs Masters: Which Should You Choose?" (Aug. 3) notes and expands on Maryland Smith's "eight specialized masters programs, across topics like business and marketing analytics, as well as finance, accounting, and supply chain management. Five of those are STEM-designated, meaning international students can stay and find work in the US without an H-1B visa. On Smith's STEM-designated Master of Science in Business Analytics, students dive into the technical—going beyond what would be covered on a traditional MBA—learning programming languages like Python and SQL. Smith runs its business master's programs alongside a thriving full-time MBA…"

Refinery29 – Aug. 3 – "Boycotts Are More Popular Than Ever — But Do They Work?" quotes Professor of Marketing Amna Kirmani: "If Amazon is your most convenient outlet in terms of shopping, it's hard to give it up," says [Kirmani]. Sometimes, depending on where you live, it might be the cheapest or the only option for certain goods. And its size can also deceive how much consensus there really is internationally. "Amazon has such a large clientele that even when you say a lot of people [boycott it], that may just be in your friend circle — nationally or internationally, it's not a lot of people."

Axios – Aug. 3 – "Virtual school is another setback for struggling retail industry" quotes marketing professor Jie Zhang: "It's not surprising to see who the biggest winners are," [Zhang] said in a research note. "Companies like Amazon, Walmart, Target, Best Buy and Apple," are best-positioned for the online learning shift, while traditional apparel stores will struggle… Related:"Is the future of malls outside?" at Retail Wire (Aug. 3) quotes Zhang as does "Retail and it's Future Through the 2020 Back-to-School Prism" at Yahoo News (July 31).

Carrier Management Magazine – Aug. 2 – "Mortgage Default Risk Set to Rise With Hurricane Risk" covers research by Professor of the Practice in Clifford Rossi under submission to the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty.

July 2020

Washington Post – July 31 – "What lies behind Apple's 4-for-1 stock split" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Few companies are as future-oriented as Apple, but its goal of attracting retail customers by having a relatively modest share price is a trip back to the past. [Kass says many companies used to split their stock as often as necessary to keep their share price in the mid-double digits. "Back then, people were paying fixed commissions to brokers and were trying to trade 'round lots' of at least 100 shares," Kass said. If you bought less than 100 shares — an "odd lot" — your commission per share would probably be considerably higher than if you bought a round lot… Related: Kass guest blogs "Year-to-date performance of five largest stocks" at Talk Markets (Aug. 1) and 'Berkshire Hathaway stock in Apple valued at $100 billion' at ValueWalk (July 31).

Newsy – July 31 -"Big Tech Earnings Surge While U.S. Sees Record-Worst Quarter" quotes Dean's Chair of Marketing P.K. Kannan:"Digital is done on a daily basis," said P.K. Kannan. Experts like [Kannan] tell Newsy this ad fallout was common for sellers during parts of Q2 because digital ad revenues can be turned off relatively quickly. "For search ads, you actually bid daily. And the same thing with display ads that you may buy on social media, those things are done on a daily billing scheme."

Forbes – July 30 – "On the Brighter Side Of The Pandemic: We Are More Adaptive Than We Think" overviews new research co-authored by management professor Trevor Foulk.

SME Magazine – July 30 – Research co-authored by Professor of Information Systems Il-Horn Hann is explained in 'Crowdfunding a democratizing force financing but benefits those with lower income, education less.'

Poets & Quants – July 26 – '2020 Best & Brightest EMBAs' includes: "The Class has certainly racked up its share of accolades. Take [Maryland Smith's] Kimberly Lumpkins. She was named one of Baltimore Magazine's Top Doctors in 2019. That year, the student council at the University of Maryland's School of Medicine also honored her with the Best Clinical Faculty Award." … Clinical Professor of Marketing Judy Frels and Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design Gerald Suarez also gave comments. Frels: "[Patricia Turner] is an executive of courage, values, and fortitude. Having her in the classroom raised the quality and honesty of the conversation for us all." Suarez:"[Lumpkins'] intellectual curiosity, passion for learning, and deep sense of duty and commitment to giving back to others were contagious and commendable. She quickly established herself as a leader among her peers."

US News & World Report – July 24 – "Are Too Big to Fail Banks Still a Problem?" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: [Kass]: "Unlike 2007 to 2009, the largest banks are very well-capitalized and recently passed an annual stress test. The major bank regulators have not expressed any concerns" about too big to fail to be a major problem. Kass notes that the Federal Reserve has suspended stock buybacks at big banks in the third quarter to deal with the unknown potential fallout from the pandemic. The Fed also capped dividends at a certain percentage of income. Still, some banks will always be more flimsily positioned than others, and some cracks have begun to emerge at major U.S. banks. "Wells Fargo did recently cut its cash dividend by 80% as a result of a quarterly loss resulting from adding to its reserves as it anticipates loan losses" from the pandemic, Kass says.

GARP – July 24 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi is quoted in "CROs Seek Pandemic Solutions," including: "This crisis will test all of the enterprise risk frameworks that have been set up since the last crisis," said Rossi.

Seeking Alpha – July 22 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "10 Stocks for Mid Year 2020."

OneZero – July 22 – "Remote Work Can Actually Flip the Power Dynamic With Your Boss" quotes management professor Trevor Foulk: [Foulk] says that further issues between management and employees can occur because bosses and other powerful people are better able to focus on others besides themselves when they feel needed, but that employee needs may get lost in the shuffle online. "There's a lot of research suggesting that powerful people tend to focus on their own goals and agendas, and tend to think of powerless people as just means to their own ends," he says. Foulk says that online conversations tend to be more transactional, and as a result, "leaders may miss subtle cues in their followers' voice and body language that indicate that they're really in need of something," leaving the manager to continue focusing on their own needs and desires, instead of the people whom they preside over.

AARP magazine – July 22 – "Where has all the Lysol Gone" quotes Martin Dresner: [Dresner] says it will likely take "a change in circumstances" to bring demand back down to a point where stores don't sell out of disinfectants right away. He expects that time will come when fears of future lockdowns ease and COVID-19 case counts start to decline.

Upgrade Magazine – July 16 – Career and leadership coach Rachel Loock and management professor Trevor Foulk give "Success tips for telework newcomers."

NHK (Japan) – July 15 – Professor of Marketing Amna Kirmani discusses the Black Lives Matter movement's implications for brands in "Businesses Rush to Support BLM."

Business Insider – July 13 – "Elon Musk is officially richer than Warren Buffett" cites previous comments by Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Yet Berkshire's $94 billion Apple stake, $137 billion in cash as of March 31, and the rest of its stock portfolio are currently worth a combined $344 billion — more than 75% of its $443 billion market capitalization. [Kass] tweeted that fact last weekend, pointing out that it implies the rest of Berkshire is worth only $100 billion. Berkshire owns dozens of businesses including Geico, See's Candies, MidAmerican Energy, and the Burlington Northern railroad.

Innovation Origins – July 11 – Distinguished University Professor Roland Rust's 'Future of marketing' paper is cited in "Tomorrow is good: It's time for a moral transition": In his recently published article 'The Future of Marketing' Roland Rust maintains that avoiding short-term decision-making is one of the most important practical implications of technological, social, and geopolitical trends nowadays. He claims that in order to survive, companies need to shift their focus from short-term transactions to long-term relationships with their clients. Incidentally, this is not a newly espoused idea, but a very important one all the same. An important idea not only for the business community but also for the government.

Washington Post – July 10 – "Shares by the Slice: Fractional Investing Sparks Stock Market Stampede" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "Companies always wanted to target their stock price in the $40 range, so if the stock price rose to $80, they split it two-for-one to get back to $40," said [Kass] "Shares were more affordable." … "If you look at the five most highly capitalized stocks — Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Alphabet and Facebook — every one of these stocks is more than $200," Kass said. "So fractional shares make sense." (Amazon founder and chief executive Jeff Bezos owns The Washington Post.) Kass said, on the whole, the positives outweigh the negatives, but he said he is troubled that fractional trading encourages speculation. "People could be looking at stock trading for the entertainment value, and inexperienced shareholders could lose money," he said.

CNN Business – July 10 – "A new world war over technology" quotes Research Professor Kislaya Prasad: The advancement of technology in other parts of the world also suggests that there are "evolving, multiple playbooks" beyond the rivalry between the United States and China, according to [Prasad]. He pointed to China's neighbor India, which is pushing for growth among local industries while also enjoying a major internet boom. When New Delhi banned TikTok and other major Chinese apps in late June, local app developers like Indian-made Chingari rushed to fill the void.

Sinclair Broadcast Group (via Fox-45 Baltimore) – July 10 "Biden and Trump battle over 'Made in America' economic agenda" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "There is this feeling, consistent somewhat with what President Trump has been doing, of moving in the direction of de-globalization," said [Kass]. "There is no doubt that we are moving in the direction of self-sufficiency. "Given the post-pandemic push from government and private businesses to secure domestic supply chains, the country will continue to move in that direction under a Biden or Trump presidency, Kass added…A less confrontational Biden presidency could spur more international trade activity for the United States, Kass suggested, plus less volatility.

The Hill – July 10 – Director of Military and Veteran Affairs Frank Goertner writes op-ed "Three questions for US defense leaders."

Science NewsNet – July 10 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi explains implications of climate volatility for the mortgage industry, via "Atlantic hurricane season and mortgage default risk."

Maryland Daily Record – July 9 – Maryland Smith's Maryland Business: Rebooted – a free webinar series targeting Maryland's workforce and entrepreneurs -- is laid out in "UMD Smith School to offer free business education program." ... Also at Herald Media (Hagerstown), others.

Los Angeles Times – July 8 – "Syringes are key to coronavirus vaccine delivery. Trump is relying on two untested suppliers"quotes Research Professor Sandor Boyson: Included in those contracts were options to dramatically expand the government's order in case of an emergency, potentially increasing the value of the contracts from as little as $25,000 to as much as $85 million, according to the 2018 request for proposals. When COVID-19 struck, HHS moved to scale up its orders under those existing contracts "That's a pretty big surge," said [Boyson]. He said such a range in demand could present capacity challenges for smaller companies.

Forbes – July 6 – Rudolph Lamone Chair and Professor in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal writes "U.S. consumers and producers need immigration In the post-Covid World." Previous Agarwal-Forbes column: "Overcoming bias in a world of bad information" (June 23).

Bloomberg – July 6 – "Buffett Sticks to Comfort Zones With His Dominion Energy Deal" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "He's willing to make investments now, of a fairly sizable amount," said [Kass]. "It's very positive that he's sending a signal for the right deal at the right price, $10 billion or more -- 'We're ready to go, we're ready to invest.'"…Related coverage atThe Energy Mix, Sina Finance, others.

I95 Business – July 4 – Distinguished University Professor Roland Rust writes guest column "Get Ready for the Feeling Economy": Emotional Intelligence and People Skills Will Drive the Future of Business."

Politico – July 3 – Research Professor Sandor Boyson contributes a "Let the military manage the supply chain" essay as part of "How to Redesign the World for Coronavirus and Beyond."

Marketplace Radio – July 3 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan comments in "Cord-cutting options getting closer to cable TV prices": …But Viacom CBS sold this as part of a bundle. You want Comedy Central? You have to buy the Smithsonian Channel and Paramount TV. "When YouTube wants to expand their coverage, then they have to go to these content producers who sell things in bundles, and so their costs go up," said [Kannan]. And as YouTube's costs go up, so do the viewer's.

Sinclair Broadcast Group – July 3 – "Record job growth seen in June, but gains could slow as coronavirus cases spike" quotes Distinguished University Professor Roland Rust: …"There are going to be a lot of people that don't want to go to work and even more people who don't want to go to a restaurant or a retail establishment," said [Rust]. Rust warned those interpreting the surge in rehiring as proof emergency relief programs do not need to be extended may be misreading the numbers. Businesses temporarily propped up by programs like the Paycheck Protection Program have been able to reopen, but many are still struggling to get back on their feet. "The opening up leads to a short-term blip in employment, but that is basically unsustainable…Unless they quickly come in with a new PPP that is even more aggressive than the previous one, what's going to happen is a lot of these small retailers that are just hanging on by a thread are going to be in trouble."

Wired UK – July 2 – Rudolph Lamone Chair and Professor in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal contributes to "There's a massive scam hiding behind Google's search results": People will always try to game automated systems when there's an incentive to do so, says [Agarwal] who has studied machine learning-assisted hiring. That's why any automated system needs human input — whether it's for job applications or search engines. But machines need to be pointed in the right direction. "The human element is critical," she says. But Agarwal says protectionist immigration policies are increasingly out of step with the new reality of widespread remote work — such as the recent suspension of visas that allow foreigners to work in the US. "If you can be abroad and work for a US company, you don't need a work visa," Agarwal says. "The H-1B visa policy is missing the point: in a remote work world, the jobs are going to follow the market."

Modern Marketing (South Africa) – July 2 – "How to attract shoppers post-lockdown" quotes Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang: "To attract consumers back, shopping malls will need to beef up their entertainment offerings, their recreational offerings, and their experiential-based shopping offerings."

June 2020

Wall Street Journal – June 30 – WSJ publishes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass' letter to the editor under "'Feelgood' Fed treating the patient correctly."

Newsy – June 30 – "How the Facebook ad boycott may also help fight misinformation" quotes Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan: The boycott has led to short-term financial impacts, as Facebook's stock dropped 8% during trading last Friday. Some of the biggest advertisers participating in the boycott, like Starbucks and Microsoft, also represent and may lead the way for industries that make up large parts of Facebook's ad revenue. "It is undeniable that much of their revenue comes from travel, hospitality, retail and CPG — and that makes up about 45-50%," said [Kannan].

Wallet Hacks – June 30 – "5 big difference between commercial banks and credit unions" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "My advice for people choosing a bank for a loan, checking account, savings account, etc. would be to visit several banks near their home or office to compare the terms (interest rates, etc.) to find the best package of services for them. Likewise, I would make similar comparisons with credit unions that they are eligible to join. If someone is looking for the highest rate of interest on a certificate of deposit (with an expiration date of 6 months, 1 year, etc.), online banks should also be considered. Both banks and credit unions insure their deposits up to $250,000."

Jot/Up – June 30 – "New Paper Identifies Flaws in Disaster Protection for Workers' Credit Act of 2020 and Prescribes Fixes" features a study by Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi.

InvestorPlace June 26 – "Money moves for recent grads" is guest commentary from Clinical Associate Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss.

Revista CEA – June 26 – Interim Dean Ritu Agarwal writes guest piece "Digital Transformation: A Path to Economic and Societal Value."

New Kerala (India) – June 25 – Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design Gerald Suarez gives insights in "A summer vacation at home: 'Safecation' tips."

NHK (Japan) – June 25 – Professor of Marketing Amna Kirmani commented in a national broadcast report (not online) titled "Black Lives Matter and Companies": "This generation is liberal, mostly. They believe in climate change – that's an important issue for them. They believe in social justice. And this is a huge social justice issue. That they want companies not just to say, 'yes we support this cause,' but for them actually to do something about it… Silence [by brands], in general, is not a wise strategy if you're targeting young people… "I asked my teenage children yesterday, 'What are the Japanese companies doing [in terms of the Black Lives Matter issue emanating from the United States]?' … 'What is Canon doing? What is Nikon doing?' … 'Well, they're featuring a lot of Black photographers and models…unlike before,' they said, 'and this is a good thing.'"

GCN – June 24 – "Algorithms can be gamed, but experienced humans can help," examines new research by Rudolph Lamone Chair and Professor in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal and management faculty colleague Evan Starr. Related coverage of the study, "Machine Learning and Human Capital Complementarities: Experimental Evidence on Bias Mitigation," via ScienMag, Eurasia Review, Sci Tech Daily, others.

Maryland Today – June 24 – "Gifts of Going Solo" features five tips for enjoying alone time as social distancing becomes the norm.

GoingConcern – June 23 – Accounting Lecturer Samuel Handwerger's op-ed "What COVID-19 Tells Us About … SALT" examines coronavirus implications for state and local taxation.

InvestorPlace – June 23 – "4 oil stocks digging their own graves" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "Dividends are at the greatest risk of being cut or eliminated in those sectors of the economy that have been impacted the most by the lockdowns and social distancing…The sharp worldwide drop in demand for oil, including gasoline for cars and jet fuel, has reduced oil prices below the breakeven point of many oil companies, thereby jeopardizing their dividends."

Poets & Quants – June 22 – "What A Post-COVID-19 MBA Looks Like" quotes Associate Dean for Master's Programs Wendy Moe from her recent comments to Business Insider: "The traditional model of teaching is being challenged," [Moe] tells Business Insider. "Lectures that can easily be recorded will give way to carefully designed synchronous activities that engage the students' critical thinking and analytical skills. This 'flipped' model of the classroom has been slowly making its way into MBA education over the past few years, but the move online due to the pandemic is accelerating that change."

InvestorPlace – June 22 – "Halliburton Is Worth Considering at $10 or Less"quotes Professor of the Practice Charles Olson: "In a market glutted with oil, you use up what you have and stop investing. This hurts a lot of companies and their workers who are in the business of being suppliers to the big oil companies. Think of companies like Baker Hughes (NYSE:BKR), Halliburton and Schlumberger (NYSE:SLB). These represent offshore drillers that provide jobs that pay pretty well but are being eliminated with the tremendous plunge in the price. Moreover, the demand for oil has been eviscerated by Covid-19 and all kinds of support jobs in the oil industry go away."…Additional Olson commentary in InvestorPlace's "3 energy stocks to buy for long-term gains." (June 22).

USA Today – June 18 – "'Boycott for Black Lives': People plan to stop spending in companies that don't support BLM" quotes Professor of Marketing Amna Kirmani: "The effectiveness varies in terms of how many people get involved and how long it lasts," according to [Kirmani]. Kirmani said the boycotts related to Black Lives Matter have the potential to be successful for a number of reasons. "With social media, instant organization and being able to reach a large number of people, efforts are likely to be much quicker."

InvestorPlace – June 17 – "3 Dow Jones Companies to Buy When Profit-Taking Kicks In" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "To prevent the recession from becoming a depression, the Federal Government will have to plug the hole in the U.S economy, created by the substantial drop in consumer spending, with trillions of dollars of additional spending by the Federal Reserve, Treasury and Congress. … The Federal Reserve can provide trillions of dollars in loans to support the economy. This funding would assist households and employers of all sizes and bolster the ability of state and local governments to deliver critical services until there is a widely available vaccine."

The Hill – June 16 – Research Professor Sandor Boyson's op-ed "Federal government must pivot from venture capital seeder to overseer" addresses the U.S. vaccine supply chain.

CNBC – June 16 – Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Anil K. Gupta is cited as among experts helping select the"2020 CNBC Disruptor 50 list of revolutionary start-ups."

Supply Chain Dive – June 15 – Supply chain management professor Adams Steven comments in "FedEx, UPS on-time performance falls in May": "FedEx, UPS, USPS, [and] Amazon all saw surges in the demand for their services putting a serious pressure on their capacities to meet this surge," Steven said. As FedEx and UPS experience peak-season-level volume, there have been reports that the carriers are hiring fewer workers compared to the same time last year, he said, plus the drop in airfreight capacity has complicated that leg of the supply chain. "In the end, the intersection of reduced capacity and increased volume results in non-deliveries, delayed deliveries, and consequently low on-time performance."

GovCon Wire – June 12 – "FAA Grants Funding Extension for U of Maryland-Led Aviation Research Consortium" includes: UMD Professors Michael Ball [Maryland Smith Senior Associate Dean for Faculty and Research] and David Lovell will lead the university's efforts for NEXTOR III, the Consortium in Aviation Operations Research composed of eight universities. "Obviously COVID-19 already has had a huge impact on aviation," Ball said. "The pandemic will result in some fundamental changes to air transportation."

QSR Magazine – June 11 – Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Marketing Amna Kirmani comments extensively in "Expert preparation tips for QSR (quick-service restaurant) boycotts, vitriol in presidential election year."

ValueWalk – June 11 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "Is the stock market socially distancing itself from the economy?" Also published by Talk Markets… Previous Kass-ValueWalk post: Why Warren Buffett Is More Concerned About Pandemics Than Wars And Financial Crises (May 11).

Business Insider – June 10 – Associate Dean of Master's Programs Wendy Moe comments in "Experts predict MBA programs post-COVID-19 will invest in more advanced virtual learning and courses on leading during crises — and experience a drop in international applicants": The traditional model of teaching is being challenged," said [Moe]. "Lectures that can easily be recorded will give way to carefully designed synchronous activities that engage the students' critical thinking and analytical skills. This 'flipped' model of the classroom has been slowly making its way into MBA education over the past few years, but the move online due to the pandemic is accelerating that change…My hope for MBA programs is that they will continue to train future business leaders on not only the tangible skills of supply chain management, marketing, operation, or HR, but also how to be adaptive leaders who can effectively manage change…Our recent crisis has forced organizations into rapid change. In a more stable environment, the environment still evolves, just more slowly, and change is still needed for an organization to succeed."

Science Newsnet – June 10 – "Work habits of highly effective teams" overviews research co-authored by management professor Cynthia Kay Stevens.

Forbes – June 9 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch comments for "Delving deeper into Facebook's murky community standards." "Put simply, Facebook cannot figure out how to consistently enforce its own standards," said [Kirsch]. "Leaving everything up to the algorithm results in the experiences you have documented – seemingly innocuous, historically legitimate photos, materials and contributions being improperly flagged as violations. Finding exactly where the Facebook AI draws the line between an inappropriate piece of Nazi propaganda and a legitimate historical inquiry into that very same topic is impossible because the algorithm itself is proprietary and therefore invisible to us. We only see the results."

Organizational History Network (Blog) – June 9 – "Historicizing the dot.com bubble and contextualizing email archives" announces funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (UK) to a research team including Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch to "investigate how historical researchers may be able to research emails as historical sources, and use this resource to historicise the dot.com boom from the perspective of a software development company."

Forbes – June 8 – Rudolph Lamone Chair and Professor in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal writes: "Creating dialogue in light of oppression." Previous Agarwal-Forbes columns: "Six fallacies that will stall COVID-19 recovery" (May 27) and "Back to the future? Imagine life 25 years ago with COVID-19" (May 11).

Poets & Quants – June 8 – Class of 2020 Best and Brightest Online MBAs profiles Maryland Smith's Leland Nislow and Vi Zenone and further highlights Zenone: Communication and collaboration were enhanced by a range of technology applications…The University of Maryland's Vi Zenone adds Canvas, Adobe Connect, and Google products like Hangouts and Docs to the list.

Herald Mail Media (Hagerstown) – June 8 – Marketing professor Rebecca Ratner gives "Tips for overcoming alone time still caused by COVD-19."

The Economist (Executive Education Navigator) – June 8 – Professor of the Practice Gerald Suarez comments extensively through "Successfully leading a distributed workforce."

InvestorPlace – June 7 – "Even with rising oil prices, Halliburton stock will stay stuck in neutral" quotes Professor of the Practice Charles Olson: "Companies need to become really lean and efficient. No one foresaw oil plunge — to $20 a barrel about a month ago and for a period of time at a negative $34 a barrel. Under these conditions, you have to be willing and able to chop costs like crazy, and many companies aren't able to do so. A lot of people in the industry were caught off-guard by that price plunge. I've been an expert in this area for a long time and I never thought I'd see anything like this. It's really shocking."

CBS New York – June 5 – Charles E. Smith Chair Professor of Finance Albert "Pete" Kyle comments extensively in "Unemployment Unexpectedly Drops, But Full Recovery Not Imminent."

Washington Business Journal – June 5 – Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs Victor Mullins contributes commentary to "The Time is Now: The region's business leaders reflect on the racial inequity that led to George Floyd's death."

Agence France Presse via Barron's – June 2 – "More than words? Racial unrest raises questions for corporate America" quotes Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd III: "There are a lot of companies out there that want to do window dressing," said [Boyd]. "You need to be acting, you need to be moving quickly…There was a time where a lot of companies said they want to be above the fray, 'let's not get involved, we're Switzerland,' Boyd said. "You don't have that luxury anymore. Brands today have to take a position."

Fourth Ventricle – June 2 – "Luxury handbag wearers likely to behave selfishly" overviews research by marketing professor Yajin Wang newly published in the International Journal of Research in Marketing.

Supply Chain Dive – June 2 – "Coca-Cola, Mondelez trim SKUs as CPGs tackle pandemic stresses": quotes Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya: The "long tail" refers to the end of a list of SKUs, usually sorted by total sales. "SKU rationalization is something all (CPG) companies always look to do … But in good times, it's not something companies spend too much time on," [says Acharya]. "The ROI on the long tail (products that interest a few but are offered because of its special appeal) is questionable."

Poets & Quants – June 1 – "MBAs to Watch: Class of 2020" profiles Maryland Smith graduating MBAs Jeremy Stratton, Vanessa Chang and Snigdha Sina.

May 2020

Find MBA – May 27 – "Should you apply for an online or campus MBA when lockdown ends?" quotes Paulo Prochno, assistant dean for part-time MBA and online programs: Online MBA students cultivate contacts via weekly live lectures at Maryland Smith. "If there's a drawback to online study, it's the challenge of providing a community experience," says Prochno. "These sessions engage the entire class," he adds. "They all see one another and the faculty in real time — an opportunity to create a real sense of community."

JSTOR Daily – May 27 – "The Commercial Real-Estate Market's Impending Crash" quotes Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi: "Lenders may find restructuring the terms of commercial loans can be an effective loss mitigation strategy," said [Rossi]. "Determining an obligor's ability to repay a restructured loan is critical to ensuring the success of any such strategy. During the 2008 financial crisis, for example, lenders faced significant redefaults on modified residential mortgages, an issue that is more pronounced in the commercial real estate sector…[Mall] landlords should prepare for a significant rise in late payments and defaults over the next couple of months…Delinquency rates on commercial real estate debt will be dominated by two factors: the speed by which states are able to reopen businesses and the degree to which consumer fears over a continuation of the virus will offset their desire to return to normal shopping habits."

NACS blog – May 26 – "How to future-proof business for disruption" overviews a recent webinar presented by Clinical Professor Oliver Schlake to fuel/convenience store retailers.

Yahoo Finance – May 26 – Professor of the Practice Gerald Suarez gives "Summer vacation at home ('safecation') tips."

Legal Theory Blog – May 25 – Interpretation of public pension legislation & the contracts clause" overviews Professor of Business Law Leigh Anenson's "Clashing Canons and the Contract Clause" paper.

Science Newsnet – May 23 – Professor of the Practice Gerald Suarez describes "How to weigh and implement the 4-day workweek."

WAMU – May 22 – Career coach Julie Neill discusses "Navigating the post-pandemic job market" as a Kojo Nnamdi Show expert panelist… Related: Neill reiterates, expands on her Kojo Nnamdi Show input in a "Future-proof your career" LinkedIn-Pulse column (May 27).

Sinclair Broadcasting/WJLA (ABC-7) – May 20 – "Lawmakers, experts at odds over urgency of further coronavirus stimulus spending" quotes marketing professor Roland Rust: "Some politicians think that they can just turn a switch and 'open up the economy,' but that will not work out the way they think it will," said [Rust]. Several sectors of the economy have been severely damaged, including retail, hospitality, travel, and entertainment, and many small businesses are facing up to three months without revenue. With unemployment potentially topping 20% in the months ahead and some businesses struggling to access existing relief funds, Rust warned moving too fast to reopen businesses could exacerbate the economic damage. "To get going again, companies need 1) customers who are willing to show up, 2) employees who are willing to show up, and 3) a slow and gradual rehiring of their workforce, as health conditions improve," he said.

Bloomberg – May 19 "Buffett cuts crisis-era bet on Goldman" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "He has this historical relationship with Goldman, so maybe there's some sentimental value," said [Kass]. "But of course, Buffett's primary concern is efficient allocation of capital." Buffett's longtime business partner, Berkshire Vice Chairman Charlie Munger, put it more succinctly around four years ago: The pair tends to fear investment-banking business more than they love it… Related: Bloomberg columnist highlights Kass' quote He's always been a little skittish about investing in investment banks after getting somewhat burned in the Salomon experience. Related: Bloomberg Money Stuff columnist Matt Levine requotes Kass.

Healio – May 18 – Interim Dean Ritu Agarwal and CHIDS Deputy Director Kenyon Crowley comment in "Public health officials turn to smartphone apps to strengthen covid-19 response": "As we learn more about COVID-19 and collect more data, smartphone apps may help us predict the presence of disease in more passive ways, such as through signals from wearables like smart watches combined with AI," [Crowley said]… Agarwal: "critical roadblocks that need to be addressed in order to effectively deploy smartphones include not only privacy considerations and data security but also the digital divide."

MamaMia-The Quicky (Australia podcast) – May 17 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch discusses "Elon Musk: Supervillain or super innovator?"

WalletHub – - May 17 – "Best gas credit cards" includes insight from Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang: "Given gas prices are so low, I actually don't see a compelling reason for gas station chains to use rewards credit cards to attract or retain customers. In addition to record-low gas prices, American consumers are also traveling much less due to the coronavirus pandemic, which further reduces the appeal of reward cards. An alternative option may be more effective -- to team up with preferred shopper card programs of grocery retailers, similar to the partnership between supermarket chain Giant and Shell…"

Washington Post – May 16 – "Why bikeshare and e-scooter companies, hit hard by the pandemic, may come back stronger" quotes Assistant Professor (DOIT) Ashish Kabra: Cities are hoping for a resurgence in the modes to avoid a return to pre-pandemic traffic levels and to help fill gaps left as most public transit systems continue to provide reduced service. "Given the choices we have, [bikes and scooters] seem to be the much safer modes of transportation. You are able to social distance yourself and still have a means to get to where you need to get to without a car," said [Kabra].

PR Daily – May 15 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan does a Q&A on "Paid social media dominant during COVID-19."

Seeking Alpha – May 14 – Management professor Trevor Foulk and Associate Director of EMBA Career Coaching, Programming and Outreach Rachel Loock give "Success tips for telework newcomers."

Brookings (Blog) – May 13 "Figures of the week: Africa's fiscal response to COVID-19" references previous commentary by William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance Lemma Senbet: For more research and commentary on Africa's rising debt see "Is sub-Saharan Africa facing another systemic sovereign debt crisis?" and the associated blog by Brahima Coulibaly, Dhruv Gandhi, and Lemma Senbet.

Wall Street Journal – May 10 – Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal contributes one of six 'Theories on why fast-growing startups seem to be disappearing': The government has been tightening rules on business in recent years, and those new regulations are disproportionately impacting small, high-growth firms, according to Rajshree Agarwal, an endowed professor and director of the Ed Snider Center for Enterprise and Markets at the University of Maryland. Not only is it easier for larger firms to meet the new standards, they can also shape regulations through lobbying, to favor themselves, she says…

Maryland Today – May 8 – "Room to Improve on Zoom" gives visual and sound tips for videoconferencing from Maryland Smith videographer Tony Richards.

Australian Financial Review – May 7 – "Study shows smarter way to trade shares" examines new research by Charles E. Smith Chair in Finance Albert "Pete" Kyle.

The Hill – May 7 – Professor of the Practice in Finance Clifford Rossi writes op-ed, "Coronavirus is a problem data models cannot comprehend."

Ms. Magazine – May 7 – Assistant Professor of Management Science and Statistics Margret Bjarnadottir writes op-ed "We're Not Waiting 200 Years to Close the Gender Pay Gap." Related: 'Keep my options open' (April 9) via Thrive Global.

Business News Daily – May 6 – "Keep online ads simple" draws from PepsiCo Chair in Consumer Science Michel Wedel's 'Thin Slice Impressions' research published by Journal of Marketing Research.

Multibriefs – May 5 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang is a primary source for "Can pandemic-surviving shopping malls actually thrive?" Related: GlobeSt's "Retail's Second Act" (May 1) quotes Zhang extensively.

Phys.org – May 5 – "Considering social influences across the customer journey" summarizes new research by Associate Professor of Marketing Rosallina Ferarro.

EE Times (Electonic Engineering) – May 4 – "Redirecting the DoD Supply Chain to Help With the Covid-19 Medical Crisis" draws from research professor Sandor Boyson's recent commentary at The Hill on the same topic.

Bloomberg – May 4 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for "Buffett's virtual meeting turns spotlight on potential successor": "He demonstrated very broad knowledge across the company. He's clearly very intelligent," said [Kass]. Buffett and Abel showed they're "on the same wavelength, they think the same." ... Still, nothing is set in stone. Buffett has yet to publicly name a successor and has a handful of executives who could take over. The legendary investor demonstrated yet again at this year's meeting that he's still mentally sharp, according to Kass.

Poets & Quants – May 2 – "Best and Brightest MBAs Class of 2020" profiles Maryland Smith's Erick Loyo with comments from Associate Dean of Masters Programs Wendy Moe.

Daily Mail (UK) – May 2 – "Devils really do wear Prada! Women who buy designer items are more likely to act in a selfish manner, study finds covers newly published research by marketing professor Yajin Wang. Republished by IOL (South Africa), others.

BSchools.org – May 5 – "Two Views" features MBA journey reflections by Maryland Smith grads Rick Hoggard (online) and Stephanie Gomez (full-time).

CNBC (via Yahoo Finance) – Berkshire Hathaway Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett answers Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass' question on stock buybacks in "This should be the guiding principle for corporate stock buybacks." Related: Kass discusses topics surrounding Berkshire Hathaway's annual shareholders meeting, via Sina Finance (China)

The Information – May 1 – Associate Clinical Professor of Management Nicole Coomber is a source for "Discovering Your Spouse's Annoying Work Personality": Coomber…has focused much of her research on the field of emotional intelligence, which involves having awareness of one's own feelings and an understanding of the needs of others. That aptitude is more important than ever, Coomber said, as people negotiate working in close proximity…

Tadias – May 1 – William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance Lemma Senbet discusses Covid-19's impact on African economies in a Q&A.

April 2020

Inside Higher Ed – April 30 – "Decision Points Loom for College Leaders" quotes David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust: "Think about it from the standpoint of the student or prospective student," said [Rust] during a Thursday conference call. "Economic problems combined with behavioral problems of students not wanting to be here, those combine to be a very tough problem to solve."

Investors Chronicle – April 30 – "What are the smartest fund managers' most loved stocks, and are they worth knowing?" draws heavily from research by Dean's Chair in Finance Russell Wermers.

Washington Post – April 29 – " How to protect your next trip against a pandemic" quotes David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust: "The coronavirus outbreak, at this point, is unpredictable," says [Rust] "That means that travel plans may end up being canceled. Consumers should maintain as much flexibility as possible."

American Entrepreneurship Institute Today – April 29 – 'Water-saving automatic flushing system wins virtual pitch competition' recaps the recent Dingman Center-hosted competition.

TopMBA – April 28 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Judy Frels contributes to 'B-school professors recommend activities to pass time in the pandemic': "Instead of reading about business, why not actively learn about it? By trying the MicroMasters in MBA Core Curriculum on the edX platform, users can sample MBA-level courses, like those Maryland Smith offers – or those from many other schools – in marketing, accounting, data analysis, and global business," says Frels. "Trying this out now is especially timely for deciding whether to enroll full time in an MBA program for this fall. Or, a student can continue in a MicroMasters program and complete up to 25 percent of an MBA for less than a credit."

Forbes – April 27 – Column by Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal addresses 'Customizing boundaries when your team suddenly works from home.' … Previous Agarwal-Forbes column: 'Three Keys to engaged, productive telework teams.' (April 14)

Capital News Service (via WTOP) – April 25 – Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking & Design Gerald Suarez comments in 'Hogan's political future tied to Maryland's economic recovery': "He is driven by facts. That is so important in a crisis. You share what you know. You share how you became aware of it. That gives you a basis for a decision. He has been pragmatic," Suarez said. "He is maintaining balance by giving you hope, by demonstrating mastery of the issue, but at the same time, he is being realistic."

Law.com – April 22 – "Reflections on the Enforceability of Noncompetes in a Post-COVID-19 World" references recent FTC-hearing testimony and related research by Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr.

TechTarget – April 22 – "Emotion AI shows promise for IT leaders in the enterprise" is based on a Q&A with PepsiCo Chair in Computer Science Michel Wedel.

DS News – April 21 – "Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac: Getting From Here to There" quotes Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi: If there's a second Trump administration, the plans to emerge from conservatorship are more likely to move forward after the election, said [Rossi]. If the Democrats win in November, they might look at it a little longer." Whichever party is in power after the election will want GSEs with a stronger risk governance so that neither Fannie or Freddie goes back to making the risky loans that were responsible, a least in part, for the conservatorship in the first place, Rossi added.

U.S. News & World Report – April 20 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass contributes to 'What financial experts are saying about the health crisis.' This health crisis "is a once-in-a-century event that the world has not experienced since the Spanish flu of 1918," says [Kass]. Fortunately, the U.S. entered the crisis with a strong economy and banking system. Kass predicts "the stock market and the economy will start to recover as soon as the number of new cases declines sharply," likely with the "development of therapeutic treatments by the end of the summer." But the economy won't fully recover until there's a vaccine, which could be two years away. While the duration of the health crisis remains unknown, he says it "is definitely not another Great Depression."

Sinclair Broadcasting Group (via WJLA ABC-7) – April 20 – Large chains securing small business relief loans spark backlash, calls for reform quotes David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust: After states lift orders for residents to remain at home, people might be reluctant to go out and spend money until they are confident the government has the virus outbreak under control. "The small businesses need more, but the loan program addresses only the supply side," Rust said. "The small businesses will not actually recover until consumer demand recovers, and that could take a long time, especially if the consumers do not trust the government's approach to the problem."

Talk Markets – April 19 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs: "Are Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Buying Now?"

USA Today – April 18 – "In a chaotic market for coronavirus masks, the feds are competition. Here's how they could help" references recent commentary by Research Professor Sandor Boyson: In an op-ed for The Hill, [Boyson] said the DLA has a vast network of key suppliers, distribution centers across the country and the know-how to quickly move supplies where they need to go. The agency employs about 26,000 civilian and military personnel around the globe managing purchases for about 5 million items, including medical equipment and protective gear. Part of its mission is supporting disaster relief and working with FEMA.

GARP – April 17 – Analysis by Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi and Executive in Residence William Longbrake supports the Risk Intelligence piece "Economies and Populations Will Recover, but When?"

HR Dive – April 16 – "Microsoft virtual internships to have lasting influence" quotes Associate Director of Career Services Rachel Loock: "[Students] want to gain the experience that prepares them for the next professional opportunity and the chance to build relationships with other professionals in their field," [Loock said]. "That really sets apart a positive internship experience from a negative one." Related: 'How to source college interns and early hires' (April 15) and '3 steps to optimize intern onboarding and training' (April 14) quote both Loock and Clinical Professor of Management Nicole Coomber.

Motley Fool (via Yahoo Finance) – April 16 – "Air Canada: Get Ready for Warren Buffett" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "Buffett said the airline labor problems from previous years have been mostly resolved," noted [Kass]. You've had a consolidation and the airlines are less likely to have suicidal price competition."

Maryland Today – April 15 – Director of Undergraduate Career Programming Ashlee Chicoine gives insights in 'Building careers during crisis.'

International Business Times – April 13 – Management and entrepreneurship professors Brent Goldfarb and David Kirsch write op-ed "Viruses cannot understand stories: Bubbles, crashes and Covid-19."

Business AM Live (Africa) – April 12 – "Your history with money affects how you negotiate" draws from research by Associate Professor of Management Rellie Derfler-Rozin.

US News & World Report – April 10 – Interim Dean Ritu Agarwal writes op-ed "Technology Can Improve U.S. Tracking of the Coronavirus."

Upgrade Magazine – April 7 – Research, co-authored by marketing professors P.K. Kannan and Michael Trusov, shows "the three most powerful drivers of effective crowdfunding."

The Hill – April 3 – Research Professor Sandor Boyson's op-ed, "A defining moment in our medical supply chain crisis," calls for the federal government to mobilize the DOD's Defense Logistics Agency: "With its authority and incredible scale of operations, the DLA can help save our collapsing medical and essential goods supply chains."

Pymnts.com – April 1 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang explains why the "Mall outlook is cloudy with an experiential horizon." Related coverage in Retail and Food Best Practices' 'How shopping malls can survive' and by The Motley Fool in "Why Simon Property Malls will be a long-term coronavirus winner" (Republished at Nasdaq), others.

Newsy – April 1 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan comments in "COVID-19 spurs record social media use — but ad revenue is falling": Kannan says social media companies are taking an early advertising hit because it's easier to cancel digital ads than physical ones or other kinds of ads. "The way traditional broadcast media works is you need to set your advertising budget well in advance, and usually the chunk for the duration for which you commit yourself is settled on a quarterly basis. They cannot just turn off those things, they've already purchased those ad slots and those ad runs. Digital is done on a daily basis. So, if you decide you want to cut down your budget, it is very easy to turn off digital media, much faster than what you can do with those traditional ones."

Credit Donkey – April 1 – Associate Clinical Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss gives "Choosing a bank" consumer advice.

March 2020

Forbes – March 31 – Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal writes op-ed "Feeling isolated or down? Try these movies to regain your sense of a purposeful life."

Bloomberg – March 31 – "A sea of seats and just 11 flyers" quotes Senior Associate Dean for Faculty and Research Michael Ball: "You can't cut a plane in half … You cut your level of service, but you have to maintain your basic routes and your network."

Medical Daily – March 27 – Accounting lecturer Samuel Handwerger gives advice on 'What U.S. taxpayers should know amid coronavirus outbreak.' Also covered by Maryland Today as "Tax advice for the pandemic era."

Healthy Holistic Living – March 26 – '9 reasons being alone is good for you' references research by Dean's Professor of Marketing Rebecca Ratner: When deciding whether to do an activity alone–like going to see a movie or play a round of mini-golf–we often perceive we won't have a good time. A scientific study by [Ratner], showed it's all in our heads. It's not that you won't enjoy yourself, it's that you think others will perceive you as lonely. The reality is that you'll have just as much fun solo as you would in a group, provided you allow yourself to enjoy the activity.

Value Walk – March 25 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "10 highlights of former Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke on CNBC."

The Fourth Ventricle – March 25 – 'Happy workplace, mood drives employee charitable giving' overviews research co-authored by management professor Meyong-Gu Seong.

WJLA ABC-7 (Sinclair Broadcast Group) – March 23 – "Lawmakers point fingers as Senate efforts to pass $2 trillion relief bill stall" quotes Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust: "I think the way they're thinking about is this is like a typical economic problem where you have some recessionary forces and the fiscal stimulus is to fight back against that," said [Rust]. "It's the typical play in the playbook for this type of situation. The problem is this is not acting like a typical recessionary force … Probably even more spending is called for, mainly because I believe the way the Republican bill is put together, a lot of people are left out," Rust said.

Maryland Today – March 20 – In 'Eating out is out: What restaurant owners and their customers can do…' Management and entrepreneurship professor David Kirsch recommends consumers apply a sort of economic triage when determining which businesses could most benefit from their dollars. Meanwhile, restaurant owners may find themselves "forced to reconsider their entire raison d'etre."

Baltimore Sun – March 19 – 'Maryland orders all enclosed shopping malls closed' quotes Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang: "It's been an essential part of the American retail landscape for about a century," said [Zhang]. Shoppers still like to buy jewelry, apparel, cosmetics and other "products that we want but we don't need" in the real rather than online world, she said. "They want to touch and feel it," Zhang said. "You're out, you're with your girlfriends, and you buy it."

Insurance Journal – March 19 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments in "NY regs ask insurers for details of business interruption policies in wake of COVID-19": "We are currently seeing the damaging effects on some business sectors and their employees of national, state and local government restrictions on 'bending' the COVID-19 incidence curve," said [Rossi] "This is an example of knee-jerk reaction to a crisis that caught governments flat-footed, and on the surface, feels good." However, Rossi explained that he believes this legislation, if passed, could have a chilling effect on the provision of viable business insurance policies going forward in New Jersey, with some property and casualty companies reconsidering their underwriting of these policies in the state altogether.

Yahoo Finance – March 19 – "Could Warren Buffett Bail Out The Airlines?" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "One of those airlines would certainly be affordable and doable" for a Berkshire purchase, [Kass] told [the Dallas Morning News]. "But then the question is, would Buffett really want to do that?"

The Hill – March 18 – Sandor Boyson writes "3 steps for mitigating severe supply shortages from coronavirus disruption." Also highlighted in Kaiser Health News Morning Briefs. Related: Supply Chain Matters reviews Boyson's commentary in "Words of Wisdom."

The Trace – March 18 – "Gun company stocks rebound as coronavirus sends market tumbling" quotes Dean's Professor of Information SystemsAnandasivam Gopal: Gopal, who co-authored a study of demand in the gun industry, said manufacturing stoppages would reduce supply, which could lead to a backlog of orders for guns. "That will allow firearm manufacturers to look very comfortable for the next 3-4 quarters," he wrote in an email. "This is why it becomes hard to clearly say that the price increase for Ruger and American Outdoor Brands [stocks] will only last a week or so, before subsiding."

CNN Business – March 17 – Associate Clinical Professor of Management and Organization Nicole Coomber contributes to 'How to work from home with kids': There is no professional advantage to pretending things are normal, said [Coomber]. You will reduce your anxiety and better manage everyone's expectations if you are upfront with coworkers about what is going on, she says. "We know that when teams have high levels of trust and a feeling of safety, they are better performing," she said. "When you are open with colleagues, it helps them understand they can be honest, too … Similarly, be honest with yourself about having your kids at home, she said. "Our kids' teachers are professionals," she said. "I can't become an elementary teacher overnight. It is unrealistic for most of us and everyone needs to have more grace with themselves at work and at home."

Insurance Journal – March 17 – "Study finds bias against job candidates motivated by pay, benefits" overviews research by management professor Rellie Derfler-Rozin.

Forbes – March 16 – Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal writes op-ed "Lessons from penicillin in the race against COVID-19."

KUTV (Sinclair Broadcast Group) – March 16 – "Stock market takes record fall despite emergency Fed rate cuts" quotes Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi: "With individuals and small businesses and travel-related industries, I think the market's reaction is more a sign that fundamental shifts are starting to rock our economy ... We are sort of in unknown territory for the moment," said [Rossi] "People are dying now," Rossi said. "When that happens, the big issue is you have consumer confidence not only being wiped out but also the personal safety issues, and the fact that there is so much uncertainty about what lies around the corner is going to create significant headwinds on our economy."

Bloomberg – March 12 – "Buffett bet that infuriated Icahn is hit hard by oil crash" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: Occidental's dwindling market value has raised speculation over whether Buffett would ever buy the company outright. While Buffett has the funds, any eventual purchase would depend on his outlook for the oil market and other variables, said [Kass]. "It's certainly well within the $128 billion that Buffett has to spend," Kass said. "But would the risks far outweigh the expected reward?"

The Conversation – March 12 – "When the coronavirus gets tough, the tough get stockpiling" draws from research co-authored by Logistics, Business and Public Policy professor and chair Martin Dresner and is covered by Maryland Today: "During coronavirus outbreak, it's hoard times."

Baltimore Sun – March 10 – 'Multiple Maryland universities cancel classes to stem coronavirus, plan to go remote' includes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass weighing in on the classroom-to-online teaching transition due to coronavirus mitigation efforts.

Maryland Today – March 10 – Decision Operations Information Technology professors Lauren Ruhe and John Bono explain via "Divided by Data" how gender bias creeps into facts and figures that shape society.

Fast Company – March 6 – "Stop annoying people with these email greetings and sign-offs" quotes Associate Director of Executive MBA Career Coaching, Programming, and Outreach Rachel Loock: [Loock] also cautions against using "Warmly" or "Warm regards." ... "The email's content may have nothing to do with people who are considered warm," she says. "And 'Cheers' is only acceptable if you are British, Australian, or offering to buy the recipient a drink later." She adds that ending an email with "Thanks in advance" is presumptuous: "It makes the assumption that someone is going to fulfill the request that you've asked for in your email."

ComputerWorld – March 6 – "Facebook changes its Libra plans to include more cryptocurrencies" includes [Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi] said Facebook's entry into the banking marketplace puts added pressure on commercial banks at a time when they are already scrambling to learn how to compete against nimbler, tech-savvy fintech companies.

Houston Chronicle – March 6 – 'American's are being mean to each other' op-ed quotes management professor Trevor Foulk, highlighting his research into rudeness as being contagious: "Some of the negotiations took place one after another, and some took place up to seven days apart … Even if negotiations were a week apart, the rudeness experienced in the previous negotiation still caused participants to be rude in their next negotiation."

Science Magazine (Scienmag) – March 6 – From "Scholars Explore Role of Digital Environments In International Marketing": Global marketers are under incredible pressure to keep up with dramatic shifts in customer journeys, observe Hyoryung Nam, (University of Washington) and P.K. Kannan (University of Maryland).

InvestorPlace – March 4 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass weighs in regarding the coronavirus effect on stocks in "7 U.S. Stocks to Buy on Coronavirus Weakness": "The worldwide fear of the coronavirus is likely to result in the outperformance of health stocks in the near future … [but] biotech stocks trying to develop a vaccine for this virus … have already had large stocks moves to the upside. Instead of those highly visible potential beneficiaries of the spreading of this disease, I suggest looking elsewhere within the healthcare sector."

Forbes – March 3 – Forbes – Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal writes op-ed "Being Successful And Self-Serving By Checking Your Bias."

Sciencenewsnet.in – March 3 – "Research Finds Bias Against Job Candidates Motivated by Pay, Benefits" overviews a new study co-authored by management professor Rellie Derfler-Rozin. Related: 'Hiring managers seek motivation purity," via Maryland Today.

Business Insider's Markets Insider – March 2 – Management and entrepreneurship professor Brent Goldfarb comments for "Should You Invest in Reg A+ Startups?": [Goldfarb] has his own reservations about the sorts of companies found on equity crowdfunding sites: "Crowdfunded companies are very high risk, and, as is the case with most entrepreneurial ventures, are more likely than not to fail. Hence, as such, companies in aggregate should only comprise a small percentage of their investments. This thinking sits behind the SEC's crowdfunding rules, as well as the rules that determine which investors qualify as accredited. In general, investors who invest broadly in the public markets by buying index-based securities will outperform investors who invest in startups, including crowdfunded startups. Admittedly, investing in startups on crowdfunding platforms or otherwise is more fun."

Science Magazine (Scienmag) – March 2 – In 'The 'Monday effect' is real,' research co-authored by Logistics, Business and Public Policy Professor and Chair Martin Dresner finds the "Monday Effect" – that letdown of returning to work after a weekend, which is documented to impact finance, productivity and psychology – also negatively affects supply chains.

February 2020

CNN – Feb. 29 – "Tired of Leap Day," about the proposed Hanke-Henry Permanent Calendar, quotes management and entrepreneurship professor Brent Goldfarb: [Goldfarb] is skeptical of the HHPC. He told the Baltimore Sun the calendar isn't "practically important." "Just as the United States was unable to shift to the metric system, I see little chance that we'd all change our calendars, computer programs and intuitive thinking to get rid of leap years and have a constant calendar," he told the paper.

Baltimore Sun – Feb. 28 – "Amid coronavirus fears, stocks of Maryland-based companies plunge with broader market" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "There is a lot of uncertainty," said [Kass] No one knows the degree that Americans or any company will be affected. ... There's concern over, 'How bad will this get?' and 'When will it end?' ... "Most stock investors, I recommend, be long term," he said. "Short-term traders and speculators I can see being concerned. I believe the coronavirus probably will be resolved for the most part in a year," after more medical interventions are developed and available. "The economy will start recovering and so would the stock market." … Kass said Maryland companies' stock sell-offs, in line with the broader market, show "the market believes that they're not any more vulnerable to the coronavirus than the rest of the economy on average."

InvestorPlace – Feb. 26 – Albert "Pete" Kyle, the Charles E. Smith Chair Professor of Finance, comments extensively in 'How Blockchain Can Revolutionize Private Equity': "Private equity is inaccessible to individual investors because it is costly for investors, large or small, to monitor less regulated and opaque private equity investments and because it is difficult for private equity fund managers or private companies to manage large numbers of investors and shareholders. Blockchain can make it easy for individual investors to purchase a stake in a company or a fund." The flip side, according to Kyle, is that "[blockchain] does not make it easier for the individual investor to obtain information about the quality of the fund or the investment. Instead, it makes it easier for the fund or the private company to keep track of who their investors are by creating a potentially transparent cap table."

Baltimore CityBizList – Feb. 28 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi gives mortgage advice in "Keys to refinancing decision with mortgage rates low." Also at Financial Times' Company Announcements, more.

E-Commerce Times – Feb. 26 – "Amazon Goes Big with Automated Grocery Store" includes insights from Distinguished University Professor and PepsiCo Chair in Consumer Science Michel Wedel.

Satoshi Nakamoto Blog – Feb. 26 – "How to future-proof your IT career in the age of AI" references research by Vojislav Maksimovic (William A. Longbrake Chair in Finance) and Roland Rust (Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing): AI is already taking some jobs and will create a need for tech staff with strong skills like "people management, working with others, emotional intelligence and negotiation skills," according to a report from the business school at the University of Maryland…

Forge Magazine – Feb. 24 – "Teach your children to manage up" quotes management professor Rellie Derfler-Rozin: Remind your child that the adult, like it or not, is actually in charge — but that this can be used in your kid's favor. When two parties hold unequal power in a negotiation, the weaker party can often improve their position by declaring their powerlessness and seeking help. "Sometimes it's helpful to show complete powerlessness rather than trying to say, 'I have control and I can complain about you,'" advises [Derfler-Rozin]. "They feel worse not coming to your help if they have power over you."

Baltimore Sun – Feb. 23 – 'Get rid of leap days … Hopkins professors propose a new calendar' quotes management and entrepreneurship professor Brent Goldfarb: "Whatever the merits of this calendar, it is not practically important… "It is extraordinarily difficult to change these sorts of conventions without some sort of government coercion, and even then, it is hard," Goldfarb said. "Just as the United States was unable to shift to the metric system, I see little chance that we'd change all our calendars, computer programs, and intuitive thinking to get rid of leap years and have a constant calendar." ... Republished by the Miami Herald, Seattle Times, New York Daily News, others.

Talk Markets – Feb. 22 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs '10 highlights of Warren Buffet's letter to shareholders." Related: Kass guest blogs "30 highlights of Warren Buffett on CNBC," via ValueWalk.

Baltimore Sun – Feb. 21 – "Maryland universities worry coronavirus outbreak in China could prevent foreign students from getting here" includes: The university's Robert H. Smith School of Business is exploring ways to accommodate students affected by a travel ban and is considering online courses and a winter start date if students are unable to secure visas by August, Dean Ritu Agarwal said in an email.

Mirage News (Australia) – Feb. 21 – "Pictures that are worth a thousand donations" covers research by information systems professor Kunpeng Zhang and co-authors that explores how incorporating images that evoke sadness or contentment spurs donations to online crowdfunding campaigns.

Barron's – Feb. 21 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass, in "Letters to Barron's," comments on Berkshire Hathaway's investment strategy and outlook.

Forbes – Feb. 18 – Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal writes op-ed "Making the world better by creating markets."

Capo Vela (cycling blog) – Feb. 18 – Research co-authored by information systems professor Ashish Kabra is summarized in "Why easy access is key to a successful bike-share program."

Virgin Islands Consortium News – Feb. 13 – Executive Communication Coach Tricia Homer comments regarding a forthcoming workshop "to bring social impact programming to U.S. Virgin Islands": "We want every talented innovator in the Virgin Islands to have access to the resources, tools, and networks they need to help solve our biggest problems."

HrNxt (India) – Feb. 10 – "Four-day week work: The future of work?" quotes Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design J. Gerald Suarez.

Business A.M. (Nigeria) – Feb. 10 – 'The founding team is a real magic bullet' covers research co-authored by management professors Rajshree Agarwal, Brent Goldfarb and Gilad Chen.

Monster – Feb. 10 – "10 Best Interview Tips to Live by" includes advice from Associate Director of Executive MBA Career Coaching, Programming, and Outreach Rachel Loock: Part of arriving fully prepared entails bringing all the things that you need to make a great first impression. Make sure to take the following items with you to job interviews: Several copies of your resume. You may meet more employees that you originally expected to, says [Look].

TalkMarkets – Feb. 7 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "The 1-Year Rate Of Return On Berkshire's Top 10 Stocks."

Multibriefs – Feb. 6 – Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design J. Gerald Suarez gives guidelines for "How to weigh and implement the 4-day workweek."

Newsy – Feb. 6 – "Gretchen Carlson Urges 2020 Candidates To End NDAs" includes insights from management professor Evan Starr: "Often workers do not know what the law is, and when they sign a contract, when it's in the fine print, they've consented to it. In some sense, that is what does the harm already because they imbue that contract with a sense of power," said [Starr]. Some change has already been in place, though … But there's still no way to fully measure what sort of impact NDAs have had on the workforce. "I think we're at a moment in our history where we're beginning to learn about the prevalence of NDAs and how commonly they are being used, outside of the typical purposes," Starr said.

Il Sole 24 Ore (Italy) – Feb. 6 – "Big data: the future passes through here" references analytics-gender pay research by Assistant Professor of Management Science and Statistics Margret Bjarnadottir.

Media Post's Marketing Insider – Feb. 5 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd writes "How Ads Can Leverage Verisimilitude," based on the recent history of Super Bowl advertising.

WalletHub – Feb. 4 – "When is the U.S. switching to chip and PIN credit cards?" includes Q&A with Clinical Associate Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss.

Maryland Today – Feb. 3 – "Scoring the Super Bowl Ads" features post-Super Bowl telecast commentary by marketing professors Amna Kirmani, Judy Frels and Hank Boyd.

January 2020

Baltimore Sun — Jan. 30 — Interim Dean and CHIDS co-director Ritu Agarwal and Professor/CHIDS co-director Gordon Gao weigh in on coronavirus messaging in 'First person tested in Maryland for coronavirus is negative': Generally during a health crisis people should look to a trusted source such as the CDC and not "random social media posts," cautioned [Agarwal] "In a situation that is evolving as quickly as the one we are facing now, there is a danger here, a lot of misinformation lurking around," she said. "Look to the one trusted and credible source of information." [Gao], a professor and co-director of the center, said people should be "data-savvy" and get context. Numbers can be scary and even deceiving alone, he said.

Science Daily — Jan. 30 — The paper "Bike-Share Systems: Accessibility and Availability," co-authored by Department of Decision, Operations and Information Systems professor Ashish Kabra is overviewed.

Baltimore Sun — Jan. 29 — Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd comments in "Ravens QB Lamar Jackson isn't signed to a big sports brand. That's likely to change soon": Brands courting Jackson might want to explore partnerships that incorporate his existing clothing lines, said [Boyd]. "With social media, we're all crafting our own brands. It's a whole different age," Boyd said. … Also at Yahoo Sports, Sacramento Bee, ArcaMax.

Forbes — Jan. 28 — Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship, writes "Killing Dialogue With Claims Of Oppression ."

CommPro Biz — Jan. 28 — Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd writes "Strategy for Super Bowl brands as Bloomberg duels Trump."

Business Insider/Markets Insider — Jan. 23 — Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass and Assistant Dean for Part-Time MBA and Online Programs Paulo Prochno separately describe the effectiveness of General Electric CEO Larry Culp in "Is JPMorgan right to call the GE stock price wrong?" Originally published by InvestorPlace.

Issues in Science and Technology — Jan. 22 — Management and entrepreneurship professors Brent Goldfarb and David Kirsch co-author a "Combatting Tech Hype" essay in the magazine's forum section.

Fortune — Jan. 17 — 'NBC's Peacock free streaming a real threat to Hulu' is fed by marketing professor P.K. Kannan: "Hulu is an outlet for content makers who don't have their own streaming service. But now that all these content producers have their own streaming service, why do they need a middleman?" says [Kannan]. "In the streaming wars, the people who produce content have the power." Also at Daily Gaming News.

European Business Review — Jan. 14 — "Start-ups: The Founding Team Is a Real Magic Bullet" overviews research newly published in Academy of Management Annals and co-authored by Rajshree Agarwal (Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship), Brent Goldfarb (Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship) and Gilad Chen (Robert H. Smith Chair in Organization Behavior).

Washington Examiner — Jan. 14 — Management professor Evan Starr is quoted and his research cited in "FTC weighs restricting noncompete agreements to boost worker job prospects": A study [by Starr] on Oregon's hourly paid workers after the state banned noncompetes suggested that such a policy would provide a significant pay raise to low-income earners. "The average worker would be better off if they banned noncompetes. This is widely agreed upon by everyone, on both sides of the aisle, Democrats and Republicans," said [Starr]. Starr was invited to speak at the FTC last week during its "Noncompetes in the Workplace" event.

Yahoo Finance — Jan. 13 — Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Anil K. Gupta comments, via The First Trade, on the U.S.-China 'phase one' deal in Why we won't get a Phase 2 trade deal 'until sometime in 2021': "Substantively there's not a whole lot here. It's more about calling a truce. It removes some of the uncertainty … at least until after the elections."

Phys.org — Jan. 13 — "How retailers can make more money in online auctions" summarizes management professor Wedad Elmharaby's "Managing Market Thickness in Online B2B Markets" paper in Management Science. Coverage also at Eurasia Review.

ValueWalk — Jan. 12 — Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs about '6 largest market capitalizations.'

Wall Street Journal — Jan. 8 — A "Realtime Economics" roundup (scroll down) cites management professor Evan Starr's presentation of his paper "Low Wage Workers and the Enforceability of Covenants Not to Compete" at a conference hosted by the American Economic Association.

NewsMax — Jan. 7 — Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass is quoted in "2019 was worst year in decade for Buffett's Berkshire": on "He's just not going to throw the money out and earn a rate of return below what his minimum target is," [said Kass]. "He is Buffett because he's patient."

Techonomy — Jan. 5 — Adjunct finance professor Ryan Guttridge co-authors "Big Tech and Media in 2020: What to Expect."

Yahoo Finance — Jan. 2 — Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass weighs in, via The First Trade, regarding financial market implications of 'Carlos Ghosn's bizarre escape from Japan': But at a bare minimum, Ghosn's odd story has probably kept alive an ongoing discussion in countless board rooms about doing business in Japan. "There is a concern that business leaders from other countries who are executives in Japan would be treated very differently than Japanese CEOs or executives. It looks like there could be a double standard ... and this could discourage investment by those locating to Japan," [Kass said].

American Libraries Magazine — Jan. 2 — EMBA Program Academic Director Rob Sheehan and his 'Mission Impact' book are cited by American Libraries Association Executive Director Mary Ghikas in her "Reflecting on Our Mission" op-ed: "[Sheehan] outlines a 'mission accomplishment' approach to articulating and measuring impact. Sheehan defines carrying out a mission as the "core purpose" of an organization, and nonprofits must measure the progress toward achieving that mission. He defines 'mission gap'—which we should collectively seek to close—as the difference between the ideal and the current reality."

December 2019

Seeking Alpha – Dec. 28 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "Berkshire at all-time high with $128 billion in cash." Related: NewsMax (Jan. 2) quotes Kass in "Buffett Said to Reject Tiffany as Berkshire Sits on $128.2B in Cash": "He's just not going to throw the money out and earn a rate of return below what his minimum target is…He is Buffett because he's patient." … Kass guest blogs in ValueWalk (Dec. 29) 'Berkshire's stake in Apple doubles in value.'

Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance – Dec. 27 – Bank of America Professor of Finance and Director of the Center for Financial Policy Russell Wermers co-authors a blogpost summarizing his research into "Institutional Trading around Corporate News."

Maryland Today – Dec. 27 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd's insights made 'VW's New Ad Campaign Takes Thoughtful Journey From Scandal' one of Maryland Today's most popular stories in 2019.

Seeking Alpha – Dec. 26 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs about 'Todd Combs as Buffett's possible successor.'

EEW (Empowering Everyday Women) Magazine – Dec. 20 – Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design Gerald Suarez gives advice in "Enjoy the Season: Slow down, enjoy the present, and be intentional about celebrating." Related: '4 mindfulness tips from Maryland Smith expert,' via Yahoo Finance (Dec. 20).

Aero Small Business Blog – Dec. 19 – Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design Gerald Suarez's insights are the basis for 'How companies should weigh, implement the four-day workweek.'

Law360 – Dec. 17 – "Noncompete misconceptions may be inhibiting reform"(behind paywall) reviews and quotes Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr's testimony at the Oct. 29 U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary Subcommittee hearing on "Antitrust and Economic Opportunity: Competition in Labor Markets." The piece is republished by Fair Competition Law: [Starr], who is one of the leading researchers trying to understand the economic impacts of noncompetes, provided thoughtful and balanced testimony about the use and effects of noncompetes, and "urge[d] Congress to consider commissioning the FTC to engage in a . . . study to help expand our understanding of potentially anticompetitive employment contracting practices and the ways they affect economic activity."

Seeking Alpha - Dec. 17 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "10 stocks for 2020."

Baltimore Sun – Dec. 13 – Accounting and Information Assurance Lecturer Samuel Handwerger writes op-ed "Trump Foundation mess could mean regulatory changes for all foundations."

BW Businessworld – Dec. 12 – Dean Ritu Agarwal writes guest column "Change Mindset, Attitudes, & Organisational Culture": Design the workplace so that employees are motivated to engage in evidence-based decision making, find synergies between human and machine intelligence, leverage the deluge of digital data available...

Forbes – Dec. 12 – Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal writes "How to collaborate your way to the top."

BizEd – Dec. 11 – Dean Ritu Agarwal writes op-ed "Achieving a Digital Mindset" as part of the magazine's January/February 2020 issue themed "The Digital and Human Future."

Marketwatch – Dec. 10 – Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr comments in "The No. 1 reason you should NOT sign your employer's non-compete clause": Several factors explain the rise of the non-compete clause, said [Starr]. Non-compete arrangements for employees won't hold up in court in California, North Dakota and Oklahoma, Starr noted. But workers need the time, resources and wherewithal to fight the case after they hear tough words from their employer. "Most cases don't get to court. They usually end with a threatening letter," said Starr.

CBS News – Dec. 10 – Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr's research and recent congressional testimony is referenced in "Half of U.S. businesses make workers sign noncompete agreements": In fact, while noncompetes are more common for higher-paying jobs that demand higher education, the majority of workers subject to these agreements are hourly workers, according to research by [Starr]…

Baltimore Sun – Dec. 5 – Smith Dean's Professor in Leadership and Management Hui Liao writes "How managers and employees can fight favoritism."

InvestorPlace – Dec. 3 – "3 Industrials Stocks to Avoid for Now" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: [Kass] pointed out how badly the tariffs have hurt these companies: "U.S. industrial companies are being adversely affected by the uncertainty of the existence and levels of tariffs between the U.S. and China over the next year or two or longer. These tariffs could impact their supply chains of inputs to their production processes as well as to the sale of the goods they produce. It is very difficult to make long-run investment decisions when the economic environment is being made more precarious by the ongoing trade war, which is also weakening the world economy. Both international and domestic demand for U.S. industrial companies is being suppressed by both actual and threatened tariffs."

Poets & Quants – Dec. 3 – "Users Won't Walk Too Far for a Bike Share" describes research co-authored by Assistant Professor of Business Analytics Ashish Kabra.

Diamondback – Dec. 3 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd comments in "Over half of anti-vax Facebook ads are from two organizations": [Boyd] called the spread of misinformation "unforgivable." He added that since "negative information travels quickly," it is up to reputable organizations to dominate the advertising platform. "We may have to give people a history lesson to say, 'you don't want to know what the pandemic looked like back in 1918,'" Boyd said. "Why would we relive history when we don't have to do this anymore?"

Authority Magazine – Dec. 3 – "5 Things We Need To Do To Close The Gender Wage Gap" is based on a Q&A with Assistant Professor of Management Science and Statistics Margret Bjarnadottir.

CIO Magazine – Dec. 2 – Maryland Smith is featured among schools with the "10 best tech MBA programs for 2019": Robert H. Smith School of Business' Full-Time MBA curriculum prepares students to lead in a data-driven economy. The program is designed to provide students with the necessary skills to analyze data, derive valuable insights and then use those insights to make informed and powerful decisions for their organization.

Maryland Today – Dec. 2 – 'Focus on the present, not the presents' features holiday season wellness advice from Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design Gerald Suarez.

November 2019

Bloomberg News – Nov. 29 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass on "Buffett Outbid by Private Equity in Berkshire's Big Deal Hunt": "He's just not going to throw the money out and earn a rate of return below what his minimum target is…He is Buffett because he's patient." Related: Kass quoted in "Buffett protégé Tracy Britt Cool leaving Berkshire," via Denton Daily (Nov. 28).

Bloomberg Law – Nov. 29 – "Perks of Work: Younger Workers Crave C-Suite's Attention" cites, excerpts and links to Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design Gerald Suarez's recent Smith Brain Trust '4-day workweek' comments… Related: Suarez describes 'how companies should weigh, implement a 4-day workweek,' via Yahoo Finance; "Tips for Implementing the 4-Day Workweek," via Recruiting Headlines: (Nov. 26); and "Can 4-day workweeks really improve employee productivity," via TechHR Newsdesk (Nov. 27).

Dallas Morning News – Nov. 29 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments in "Warren Buffett bet billions on the big four airlines — and so far it's paying off": "Buffett said the airline labor problems from previous years have been mostly resolved, you've had a consolidation and the airlines are less likely to have suicidal price competition… [Buffett] prefers to own a company forever," Kass said. "He's owned Coca-Cola since 1988. The only time he would get rid of a company is if [it] ran into significant operating problems" … Related guest blog at TalkMarkets: "Warren Buffett's Bet on Airlines"

Science Magazine – Nov. 29 - EY Alumni Professor of Managerial Accounting and Information Assurance Lawrence Gordon co-authors "Cyber risk research impeded by disciplinary barriers."

Penn Live/Patriot-News – Nov. 25 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd on Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson's marketing potential: "If Lamar Jackson keeps this up," said [Boyd], "can you imagine a battle between Nike and Under Armour and whoever else trying to get this guy?"

Morning Consult – Nov. 25 – Accounting lecturer Samuel Handwerger writes op-ed, "How a federal tax statute is harming marijuana business."

Très Click – Nov. 25 - German magazine covering fashion, beauty and pop culture features Dean's Professor of Marketing Rebecca Ratner's 'Bowling Alone' research in "Why being alone does not mean loneliness - a plea for a date with yourself."

Bloomberg News – Nov. 23 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for "Berkshire takes on short sellers with bet on furniture retailer": The relatively small size of Berkshire's stake in RH, which totaled $206 million at the end of the third quarter compared to Berkshire's $56 billion bet on Apple Inc., likely indicates it was made by one of Buffett's two investing deputies, Todd Combs or Ted Weschler, according to Kass…"Maybe they saw a certain growth opportunity here that other analysts are missing…Much of their investment career is to try to find those rare underpriced opportunities where they expect to outperform the market."

WTOP – Nov. 23 – Associate Clinical Professor of Management Nicole Coomber contributes to "Business professors size up Washington Redskins' problems": "People tend to emulate the behaviors of the leader … there's organizational culture that permeates throughout the entire organization. It can be things like stories people tell or rituals they observe or even material symbols of what's important in the organization," [said Coomber]. "Authentic leadership — where someone is able to express their values, to show that they are vulnerable and willing to learn and to take risks — and in our culture today that seems to be the leader that seems to resonate the most with people."

International Business Times – Nov. 22 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan writes op-ed: "How Retailers Can Stave Off The Incoming 'Retail Apocalypse.'"

Maryland Today – Nov. 22 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang explains how augmented reality is "changing how you shop during the holidays." Previous Maryland Smith expert contributions to Maryland Today: Associate Professor of Logistics Management Philip Evers on 'Retailers bracing to make sure gifts arrive on time' (Nov. 18), Assistant Professor of Marketing Bo "Bobby" Zhou on 'Content still king in streaming wars' (Nov. 14).

National Law Review - Nov. 21 – 'Senate committee hearing on proposed federal non-compete bans' includes a summary of testimony and related research by Assistant Professor of Management Evan Starr.

Ed Times (India) - Nov. 21 – "Don't Want AI To Steal Your Job? Prepare Yourself With 'Feeling Tasks'" profiles recent research co-authored by Distinguished University Professor and David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing Roland Rust and Vojislav Maksimovic, the William A. Longbrake Chair in Finance.

InvestorPlace – Nov. 20 – "Should Bank of America stock be on your Black Friday shopping list?" cites and quotes accounting professor Rebecca Hann from her recent paper, "Aggregate Earnings Surprises, Monetary Policy, and Stock Returns."

Baltimore Sun – Nov. 20 – Clinical Professor of Accounting James McKinney contributes to 'Howard school board looking to reduce $39.2 million health deficit': "In general, adverse opinions over financial statements are very rare…Adverse opinions only occur after management or leadership have refused to adopt changes that the auditors feel are necessary to properly represent the correct position of the entity being audited."

Forbes – Nov. 20 – Rajshree Agarwal, the Rudy Lamone Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, writes op-ed: "When being selfish creates a win-win."

MarketWatch – November 18 – 'Fed's Mester says she didn't want to cut rates' quotes Cleveland Federal Reserve President Loretta J. Mester from her Maryland Smith-hosted Fireside Chat moderated by Professor of Finance Haluk Ünal… Related coverage of Mester's Maryland Smith visit: "Fed's Mester: U.S. monetary policy in a good spot," via Reuters and Yahoo Finance.

U.S. News & World Report – Nov. 14 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass helps explain "How the stock market works."

Dataconomy – Nov. 14 – Research Professor Kislaya Prasad contributes to 'Does digital health discriminate against low socioeconomic groups?': According to [Prasad], people from low socioeconomic groups have always been disadvantaged when it comes to access to health care. "This is especially true when it comes to preventive care and the management of chronic conditions. The move towards digital health is likely to make things worse…Wearable devices and apps to manage chronic conditions are likely to be used disproportionately by the wealthy. We are moving towards a world where a constant flow of personal data (from devices around us) will be used to provide personalized care. The advantages of these new technologies are more likely to flow to the rich. There is a bigger danger here – that new treatments and discoveries will be based on the analysis of this data."

WalletHub – Nov. 13 – Professor of Marketing Jie Zhang, via a Q&A, assesses 'Capital One's marketing strategies.'

Education Technology Insights Magazine - Nov. 11 - Management and Entrepreneurship professors David Kirsch and Brent Goldfarb co-author "Reality Check for EdTech Startups."

Baltimore Sun Education Marketplace – Nov. 2019 - "Acquiring transferable skills" (Page 2) highlights the iSmith initiative targeting undergrads, with insight from Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies Victor Mullins and Rajshree Agarwal, the Rudy Lamone Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy. Separately, Clinical Professor of Management Paulo Prochno describes global study opportunities for part-time MBAs, including the course Doing Business in Brazil, in "Expanding skills in leadership programs" (Page 4).

Brookings Institute blog – Nov. 7 – Recap of a recent Future of Work in Africa panel discussion highlights input from participating expert Lemma Senbet, William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance: Another panelist, Lemma Senbet…highlighted that innovation can occur without technology. Policymakers and implementers must understand what it means to innovate in various sectors, especially agriculture in Africa, and what policy environment is needed to foster innovation.

Capital News Service – Nov. 7 – Marketing professor Yajin Wang discusses marketing strategy and consumer behavior for a video story (starting at 1:50) exploring factors into disruptive incidents at retail establishments including recent violence at a Popeye's restaurant.

Decider - Nov. 6 – Marketing Professor Michel Wedel is quoted, related to his Video Content Marketing: The Making of Clips" research, in "Smells Like '10s Spirit: How That Iconic Trailer Saved 'The Social Network'": At its core, the preview of a coming attraction must serve the purpose of generating interest in the film with the end goal of driving ticket sales and views. But to achieve this mission, trailer editors often employ tactics borrowed from the toolbox of the artist. As University of Maryland professor Michel Wedel observes, "They [trailers] are more like a sample of the product than a testimonial to its better qualities." Since the product takes the same form as the vehicle to sell it – scenes spliced together with sound – conventions for trailers solidified around encapsulating the viewing experience in microcosm.

U.S. News & World Report – Nov. 6 – Research Professor Kislaya Prasad writes op-ed titled "Should we fear China's corporate credit system?"

Forbes – Nov. 6 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudy Lamone Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, writes "The high cost of not asking questions (in university settings)." Previous Agarwal-Forbes columns: "Trader Sudoku: Nine-part tool to create your fit" (Oct. 22), 'With whom should you trade' (Oct. 9)

U.S. News & World Report – Nov. 4 – Maria Pineda, senior director of admissions for full-time MBA programs and specialty master's programs, comments in "How to Get Employer-Sponsored MBA Degrees": Private businesses aren't the only types of employers that provide MBA sponsorships. Maria Pineda…notes that the military is "the most popular domestic sponsoring organization" among MBA students at UMCP. "Each year, several of our students are sponsored by one of the service branches, like the Army, which have sent several of our active duty members to complete the MBA.

ValueWalk – Nov. 4 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs 'Berkshire Hathaway trading at price to Book Value Ratio of 1.33.'

Inside Higher Ed – Nov. 4 – Marketing professor Yajin Wang is quoted in "Your Interview With AI": [Wang] says that most of the things students can do to prepare for HireVue job interviews will make them better public speakers…"Ace an AI interview by incorporating keywords and phrases that explain what you can contribute, echoing the exact language of the job posting…Use gestures, smile, and nod frequently." Wang suggested candidates record themselves and watch their answers to prepare.

October 2019

Fortune – Oct. 31 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan comments in 'Apple and Disney Are Serious Threats to Netflix': "Over time not all these players are going to survive," says [Kannan]. He argues that the cost of content, competition, and finite number of subscribers will shorten the playing field. Just Tuesday, Sony announced it will shut down PlayStation Vue, its streaming service.

Dataconomy – Oct. 31 – In 'The Data Gap on Maternal Health and Jails': Margrét Bjarnadóttir, assistant professor of management science and statistics, says collecting data and analyzing it is key to appropriate resource allocations, and the maternity services in the U.S. prisons are no different. "Data allows you to understand the magnitude of services needed and – more importantly – by collecting data on outcomes, the health of both mother and the newborn, best practices could be identified and applied across the system."

Houston Chronicle – Oct. 29 – Professor of Finance Steve Heston is cited for his expertise in "Mattress Mack's balance sheet: $13 million lost on Astros evens out: Curtis, the publisher of LasVegasAdvisor.com, worked with bettor Frank Betti and with [Heston], to advise McIngvale on obtaining the most favorable odds and deciding how much risk to take to cover his potential mattress refunds.

New York Times – Oct. 28 – Marketing professor Rebecca Ratner's "Inhibited from Bowling Alone" research is referenced in "Why You Should Find Time to Be Alone With Yourself": [Inhibited from Bowling Alone] has shown that people often feel inhibited from enjoying activities alone, especially when they think others are watching them. Overestimating how much other people are paying attention to us, and worrying that we're being judged, can stop us from doing things that would otherwise bring us joy.

Think:Act Magazine – Oct. 28 – Management and Entrepreneurship Professor David Kirsch comments for 'Winding down failed Silicon Valley startups offers valuable lessons': "We pay lip service to failures, but we haven't really done much learning from failure at the organizational level…Marty [Pichinson] has a unique window into the venture ecosystem that even top VCs don't have since they always look forward to the next deal. He's the undertaker, and corpses tell a story, too. A corporation is like a social corpse that we can study…If we get to 50 companies, we'd have something really valuable. We could use machine learning and other methods to identify the leading indicators of failure, perhaps the burn rate, structural features, communication patterns and types of market tests."

Maryland Today – Oct. 28 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd describes the regional, socioeconomic effect of the Washington Nationals' World Series run, in "Reflecting Success."

U.S. News & World Report – Oct. 24 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass weighs in on "Pros and Cons of Buying Berkshire Hathaway Stock": Berkshire is currently selling at a below market average price-earnings ratio and its earnings are projected to grow at an above market average rate over the next few years," [says Kass]. "Its intrinsic value is likely at least 10% above its current share price. Therefore, it's undervalued and should be outperforming the market over the near future."

Quirks Media – Oct. 24 - Associate Director, EMBA Career Coaching, Programming and Outreach Rachel Loock is the lone, expert source in "Recovering from interview failure: a guide."

Enterprise Risk Magazine – Oct. 24 - Adjunct professor Linda Conrad is announced as Institute of Risk Management's New global ambassador for the United States.

Maryland Today – Oct. 15 – The working paper "Delaying Informed Consent: An Empirical Investigation of Mobile Apps' Upgrade Decisions" co-authored by Siva Viswanathan, Dean's Professor of Information Systems and Digital Innovation, is the basis for 'For app developers, bad behavior doesn't pay.'

Princeton Spark – Oct. 10 – In podcast segment "It takes a network to make a dream work," Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd says: Mary Gates connecting her son (Bill Gates) with IBM's John Opel via United Way (spurring a landmark transition in computing and propelling Microsoft) exemplifies networking and "why you should always have your feelers out."

MarketWatch - Oct. 9 – "How to get ready for the [feeling] economy and make your job AI-proof" reports on new research co-authored by Roland Rust, David Bruce Smith Chair in Marketing, and Vojislav Maksimovic, William A. Longbrake Chair in Finance: Businesses have long needed people who can read a room to close a sale and managers who know how to motivate workers. "But those skills can't be easily performed by AI." ...Related coverage at MindBodyGreen: "Research shows you need emotional and people skills to get hired" (Oct. 9).

New Kerala (India) – Oct. 9 – Several Maryland Smith faculty experts contribute to "54 Women Who Could Have Made Forbes' Innovator List."

Financial Advisor Magazine – Oct. 10 – Professor of Finance Russ Wermers is named to the Security and Exchange Commission's new Asset Management Advisory Committee: "We are also pleased that the SEC included academic Russ Wermers," [said IAA President and CEO Karen Barr]. Wermers conducted the research on a recent IAA paper. It found that the benefits to investors, capital markets and the economy of active management exceed the average "alpha" measurement active managers use… Related coverage at Yahoo Finance.

InvestorPlace - Oct. 8 - Jie Zhang, Harvey Sanders Fellow of Retail Management, is a source for "Walmart's Recovery Already Priced Into Walmart Stock": Moreover, Walmart's expansion outside of North America had led to either stagnant growth like in China or embarrassing market exits such as the ones experienced in both Germany and Brazil. However, at about this time, the company finally adapted to the changing retail environment, according to Jie Zhang…Zhang said that the company adopted the e-commerce strategies of its rivals. This helped set the stage for the company's recovery.

The Verdict – Oct. 8 – 'The Future Feeling Economy' profiles new research, co-authored by professors Roland Rust and Vojislav Maksimovic, finding that future, in-demand job skills will be decreasingly technical and increasingly emotive. Related coverage at Science Magazine, Phys.org and others.

Inc. - Oct. 3 - Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan is sourced in 'Hiking Up Your Price Can Actually Build More Brand Loyalty': Normally, vendors would simply raise prices to compensate. But that's not happening, according to [Kannan]. Apparently even the huge retailers (like Target and Walmart) are "taking every step necessary to prevent raising prices." What's up with that? Kannan believes that retailers understand that over the past few decades of globalization, consumers have come to expect low prices, thereby making price jumps "a last resort because, in short, we're too cheap."

WalletHub – Oct. 1 – Associate Dean of Master's Programs Wendy Moe details how an MBA degree is worth the investment.

September 2019

Financial Times – Sept. 30 – In a "Letter to The Financial Times," Investment Adviser Association President and CEO Karen Barr cites Professor of Finance Russ Wermers' "Active Investing and the Efficiency of Security Markets" paper (recently posted at SSRN) to counter a previous FT op-ed: The op-ed ignores academic research that affirms active management makes markets more efficient. "Active Investing and the Efficiency of Security Markets, a recent review of an extensive body of literature by [Wermers] finds that active managers play a critically important role in the functioning of markets.

Times of India – Sept. 29 – Management professor Trevor Foulk and his research into workplace behavior are sources for "The incivility epidemic is upon us": (Foulk) likens rudeness to common cold, and says it's contagious. "When it comes to incivility, there's often a snowballing effect. The more you see rudeness, the more likely you are to perceive it from others."

CNN Business – Sept. 28 – Management and entrepreneurship professor David Kirsch weighs in on "Uber's new offerings don't measure up to its challenges": Uber executives described new rider perks, transit integrations and sustainability efforts… [CEO] Khosrowshahi also showed off what he described as "the next generation of the Uber app," with more integration of its food delivery and micromobility services… "It's lipstick on several pigs at once," said [Kirsch]. "I'm trying to figure out what magic do they think they're invoking by putting these things into a single app." … Kirsch noted that it's not burdensome for Uber users to switch to another app, such as Grubhub, for the features Uber is now better integrating in its app.

The Economist (GRE Advisor) – Sept. 27- Associate Dean of Master's Programs Wendy Moe weighs in on "What does it take to get into a top graduate school? (Deans of highly-ranked schools share admissions secrets)": "Our program prepares students to lead in a rapidly evolving, data-driven economy…As such, we look for individuals who want to learn how to use data in business decisions and how to be effective leaders in this environment…A solid application includes a strong undergraduate record and GMAT/GRE score, and work experience that showcases career accomplishments. We also consider how each candidate will contribute to the Smith community, in terms of career path, co-curricular activities, or as a future alum."

Detroit News - Sept. 26 - Professor Emeritus Edwin Locke comments in "GM, UAW battle over worker pay from temps to CEO": But the CEO position is probably one of the hardest jobs in the world, said [Locke]. It often requires smart and swift decision making, while keeping in mind the many headwinds and operations around the globe.

Disruptor Daily - Sept. 25 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan, in a series of posts, gives insights into AI's impact on advertising in terms of "state of," trends," "challenges," "benefits" and "future."

Maryland Today – Sept. 25 - Wedad J. Elmaghraby, professor of management science, gives insights to how "Fashion Rental Companies Could Help Save the Planet": …Renting your wardrobe actually can reduce the industry's environmental footprint "if it can go to scale, meaning that a lot of people are using the rental market as the main mechanism for clothing themselves."

New York Post - Sept. 18 - Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for "Buffett protégé Tracy Britt Cool leaving Berkshire Hathaway": "I'm very surprised she is leaving," said [Kass], a University of Maryland professor who blogs about Warren Buffett. "She's been there about 10 years and there is very little turnover at headquarters." … Related: The Wealth Advisor quotes Kass from the New York Post.

AMA Marketing News – Sept 18 – Distinguished University Professor and PepsiCo Chair in Consumer Science Michel Wedel describes why he "Advocates Exploring Big Data Bridging Academic Practice," via an American Marketing Association Q&A commemorating his receiving the 2019 The Robert J. Lavidge Global Marketing Research Award.

Computerworld - Sept. 18 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments for "Why France and Germany fear Facebook's cryptocurrency – and plan to block it": "Given what their ambitions might be, I might start referring to them as Facebook Bank," said [Rossi]. "Facebook's entry into the banking arena puts added pressure on commercial banks at a time when they are already scrambling to learn how to compete against nimbler, tech-savvy fintech companies." Related: Robots.net quotes Rossi from his comments at Computerworld.

CityBizList – Sept. 17 - Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan helps explain the methodology flaw in Forbes' list of America's Most innovative Leaders for which several Maryland Smith experts compiled a list of their own in "54 women who should make any list of innovators": [Kannan's] research into artificial intelligence and machine learning has underscored the flawed list by showing the dangers of blindly relying on algorithms to make important decisions. "Small errors," he says, "like a flaw in the attribution scheme, can have a major impact."

ValueWalk – Sept. 17 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs about 3G Capital selling shares of Kraft Heinz.

Forbes – Sept. 17 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudy Lamone Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, writes "What's Your Value Proposition? Three Steps To Self-Branding" – the third in its series. (Previous pieces at Forbes: "Three Steps to Self-Discovery" and "Three Steps to Self-Esteem").

WTOP - Sept. 16 - Associate Director of Executive MBA Career Coaching, Programming and Outreach Rachel Loock gives advice in "Bomb your job interview? Here's how to follow up in email."

New York Times - Sept. 11 - Associate Clinical Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss weighs in on the lasting, post-traumatic stress from witnessing the attacks of 9-11 from ground zero: "I would see the planes coming in for a slow landing…I would relive seeing the plane hit" the south tower. [Kiss] said she assumed her post-traumatic stress had largely disappeared over the years. But on Sunday night, lying awake, the nightmare replayed again and again. "I kept seeing the plane hit in the middle of World Trade 2."

Computerworld - Sept. 11 - Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi explains "What Apple's embrace of cryptocurrency could mean for the payment industry," in a Q&A.

Seattle Times - Sept. 11 – Clinical Professor of Marketing July Frels comments on trends impacting MBA stakeholders in a republished piece, "Thinking about getting an MBA? Here's how the degree is changing."

Terp Magazine – Sept. 10 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd answers "What's the Most Important Cultural Object in the World?": The Gettysburg Address. In a two-minute speech, Abraham Lincoln encapsulates the rationale for the Union cause. The U.S. Civil War, in many respects, becomes the inevitable test of the proposition that all men are created equal (even those held in bondage). In plainspoken language with an almost hypnotic cadence, Lincoln showcases his political genius to forge a connection with the common man. To this day, Americans still cherish his deftly chosen phrases such as "they gave the last full measure of devotion," "a new birth of freedom" and "government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth."

Kiplinger's – Sept. 10 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass contributes to "7 Cheap Stocks to Buy in a Pricey Market": [Kass] recommends Bank of America investors seeking out cheap stocks to buy. Its forward-looking P/E of around 9 is its lowest in years, and half the S&P 500 average. BofA has improved its earnings per share steadily every year since 2014. Earnings per share (EPS) have increased steadily every year since 2014, and in fact roughly doubled from $1.31 per share in 2015 to $2.61 last year.

Washington Post - Sept. 8 - Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan comments on MBA marketing trends in "Is getting an MBA worth the leap?": [The MBA] can also be the optimal degree for students who want to transition from specialized roles into administrative or managerial positions. "Say you've been working in manufacturing and were in charge of engineering quality control, but you want to move to a more administrative role," says [Kannan]. "A general management degree like an MBA will really provide that overview of how a firm functions and how different roles come together."

Washington Post – Sept. 8 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan helps answer "Is getting an MBA worth the leap?": The MBA] can also be the optimal degree for students who want to transition from specialized roles into administrative or managerial positions. "Say you've been working in manufacturing and were in charge of engineering quality control, but you want to move to a more administrative role," says [Kannan]. "A general management degree like an MBA will really provide that overview of how a firm functions and how different roles come together."

Harvard Business Review – Sept. 6 – Management professor David Waguespack co-authors "Where a Founder Is from Affects How They Structure Their Company."

ComputerWorld – Sept. 6 – "Apple exec confirms cryptocurrency is on company radar" includes:

Clifford Rossi, a finance professor at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business, said Facebook's entry into the banking marketplace puts added pressure on commercial banks at a time when they are already scrambling to learn how to compete against nimbler, tech-savvy fintech companies.

Maryland Today – Sept. 6 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan explains why 'Disruptor brands are booming.'

Web Investigator KK - Sept. 5 - Management and entrepreneurship professors David Kirsch's and Brent Goldfarb's "The Economics of Bubbles" essay, drawn from their 2019 book "Bubbles and Crashes." is republished.

Forbes – Sept. 4 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudy Lamone Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, writes "How do you measure success? Three steps to self-esteem" ... Related, previous Agarwal-Forbes column: "What's Your Purpose?Three Steps To Self-Creation" (8/19).

Science Magazine – Sept. 4 - "Automated text analysis opens the black-box of interactions, allowing researchers to directly access what is being said and how it is said in marketplace communication," says Associate Dean of Master's Programs and Wendy Moe regarding her recent research into "Automated text analysis: The next frontier of marketing innovation" … Also summarized in an America Marketing Association blogpost.

Délibéré – Sept. 1 - France-based culture blog references management professor Trevor Foulk and his 'workplace rudeness is contagious' research in an 'Applied insultology' post exploring the implications of Donald Trump's rudeness as a head of state: As social scientists have shown, rudeness and incivility are "as contagious as a cold" - in the words of Trevor Foulk of the University of Maryland - and one is no longer very far from the epidemic.

Mortgage Compliance Magazine – Sept. 2019 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi contributes "Managing mortgage product risk" guest column.

August 2019

CNBC – Aug. 30 – From piece commemorating Warren Buffett's 89th birthday: "Having the good luck to win the 'ovarian lottery' is a major determinant in success in life in general — and in business in particular," [Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass told CNBC…based on notes he took at a 2013 graduate student event where Buffett spoke.

Poets & Quants – Aug. 28 - Overview of global research rankingshighlights Maryland Smith as No. 5 in UT-Dallas' sub-ranking for marketing research.

BizWomen – Aug. 28 – 'Why you 'needed' a Popeyes chicken sandwich' cites and links to marketing professor Rebecca Ratner's 'Scarcity Polarizes Preferences' research (summarized here).

Maryland Today - Aug. 26 – "Game of Chicken" draws from Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd describing how "social media jockeying made Popeyes' sandwich a viral sensation."

Frederick News Post – Aug. 25 – Dingman Center Managing Director Holly DeArmond, via "Local college student starts virtual reality gaming business," describes the Terp Startup summer accelerator program.

Washington Post – Aug. 24 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi contributes to "Trump's company could save millions if interest rates fall as he demands": Trump could save at least $600,000 and as much as $1.1 million annually on just the larger of the two Doral loans if the Fed made a percentage point reduction, depending on the loan agreement, according to Clifford Rossi…"If you're a consumer borrower with a car loan or a credit card, a quarter-point reduction is significant savings," Rossi said. Trump "has more loans and a bigger dollar size, so he would get certainly a larger reduction on the amount owed than most Americans out there."

ValueWalk – Aug. 16 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "8 Highlights of David Rubenstein on CNBC."

GARP – Aug. 16 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes CRO Outlook column: "Comprehensive Reform Is Needed to Reduce Mortgage Risk."

U.S. News & World Report – Aug. 15 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for 'Worrisome trend in stock buybacks': "If a company purchases its shares at prices above intrinsic value, then it is destroying shareholder value, which would lead to a decline in the price per share," says [Kass].

Android Authority – Aug. 14 – Explainer on MicroMasters programs references and links to Maryland Smith's program.

Fortune - Aug. 14 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass helps explain "What is an 'Inverted Yield Curve'?": But the inversion today is different from the past. "Every recession that we've had in the U.S. since World War II, with one exception of the Great Recession, was preceded by the Federal Reserve raising interest rates too far, too fast from much higher levels than the current levels," said [Kass]. The Great Recession, which Kass called "one of a kind," was the result of "an excessive amount of debt in the housing market and the collapse of the housing market and the economy." But the Fed just dropped the rate by 0.25% and investors expect as many as three more small cuts by the end of the year. As for debt, "I don't see an excessive amount of debt in any sector," Kass said… Related: Early iteration (no longer online) of Washington Post's coverage of same issue quoted Kass, as does the National Review's "That Crazy Inverted Yield Curve."

SHRM's People + Strategy - Aug. 12 – Management professor Subra Tangirala co-authors "Forge a Deeper Level of Diversity," drawn from his 'Centralization of member voice in teams' paper at the Journal of Applied Psychology.

Washington Post – Aug. 9 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass contributes to 'How to survive volatile markets': If $1,000 were invested in the Dow Jones industrial average at its inception in 1896 (123 years ago), it would be worth $172.5 million today, Kass said. The lesson here is twofold: First, stay in the market because you never know when stocks hit their bottom and rebound. Even Warren Buffett doesn't know. But they always rebound eventually. Since 1965, the value of the S&P 500 with dividends included has declined in only 11 of the 54 years, or just 20 percent of the time, Kass said. It has gone up in 80 percent of those years.

Aeon – Aug. 8 – Management and entrepreneurship professors Brent Goldfarb and David Kirsch co-author "The economics of bubbles" -- an essay drawn from their 2010 Bubbles and Crashes book… Related: 'The froth on the market' at Medium reviews the essay.

Maryland Today – Aug. 7 – Marketing professor Jie Zhang explains the trend of brick and mortar retail mixing in upscale dining to increase shopper traffic in "Taste of the future at shopping malls."

Business a.m. (Nigeria) – Aug. 5 – "How big is Africa's economy?" quotes Lemma Senbet, William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance: "[W]hether its oil in Nigeria and Angola, coffee in Uganda or copper in Zambia, single-commodity domination of an economy can end up shackling growth."

July 2019

Baltimore Sun – July 31- Interim Dean Ritu Agarwal writes op-ed, "Colleges must prepare students for an AI world."

Dallas Observer – July 31 – "Southern Dallas' investment climate Is similar to Kazakhstan's – SCARY," draws from Logistics Business and Public Policy professor Bennet Zelner's "policy risk" research: [Witold J. Henisz and Bennet A. Zelner] argued in their piece published nine years ago that none of the traditional business tools work effectively as hedges against that kind of risk. Insurance won't do it, because no insurer is dumb enough to insure you in a place where you're sure to get skinned…there is money to be made in dodgy emerging markets, and they suggest ways it can be done: "The network of relationships in a society greatly influences policy outcomes," they write, "especially in countries with weak legal systems. To turn these networks to their advantage, international investors must identify and engage local politicians' power bases."

Maryland Today – July 31 – Dingman Center Managing Director Holly DeArmond comments on the center's Terp Startup summer accelerator program: "It has been really interesting having this many teams, seeing how they come together as a cohort," [said DeArmond]. "That was an unknown, but I've been pleased with how they've really pulled together and helped one another, giving advice and feedback on their various challenges and opportunities."

Fortune – July 29 - Management and Entrepreneurship professor David Kirsch comments in "The bond market is betting Tesla is in trouble": When bonds are trading at such a discount it can make investors skittish going forward and also drive up the cost of borrowing, which is "already an issue," said [Kirsch]. Trying to stress the positive, Tesla's executives touted the quarter's positive free cash flow…The company's cash position improved in Q2 because the company sold down inventory and because of cost cutting," said Kirsch. "The company reduced [capital expenditures] well below guidance and below what they need to be investing to putatively grow the business in the future."

Forbes – July 29 - Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph Lamone Chair and Professor in Strategy and Entrepreneurship, writes column, "Human Dignity And The Principle Of Trade"… Previous Agarwal-Forbes commentary: "How to share power without all the drama" (July 16).

Investing.com – July 28 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "Berkshire Hathaway's stake in Bank Of America exceeds 10%"… Also published by ValueWalk… Related Kass-ValueWalk blogpost: "5 highlights of Berkshire Hathaway's second quarter report" (Aug. 5).

GARP – July 19 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi's latest CRO Outlook column: "Will Shadow Banking Cause the Next Financial Crisis?"

Wall Street Journal Letters – July 17 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass responds in disagreement with the recommendation for the Federal Reserve to re-introduce a gold standard (scroll down).

Variety – July 17 – 'Consumers losing in the streaming wars' quotes marketing professor P.K. Kannan: The dizzying array of choices — and the cost required to gain access to all of them — is enough to make a new-age TV watcher run back to cable. "Will it be cheaper? Not so," says P. K. Kannan… "Prices for content will generally increase."

WalletHub – July 17 – Associate Clinical Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss gives 'credit cards for international travel' advice for consumers, in a Q&A.

US News & World Report – July 16 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass contributes to "How to invest in the S&P 500 at all-time highs": Likewise, the stock market good for now seems to far outweigh the bad. "Since the outlook for the U.S. economy over the next few years is good with GDP projected to grow at 2% or higher, interest rates expected to remain near historically low levels and corporate profits expected to grow, the S&P 500 index continues to be an attractive investment vehicle," says David I. Kass. "My advice to the trustee could not be more simple: Put 10% of the cash in short-term government bonds and 90% in a very low-cost S&P 500 index fund."

Poets&Quants – July 15 – Finance executive and Maryland Smith graduate Gretchen Macleod describes why her EMBA experience contradicted the myth of grad school as a "waste to a seasoned professional" – as part of "15 biggest myths about Executive MBA Programs."

HR Magazine – July 15 - Kathryn Bartol, Robert H. Smith Professor of Leadership and Innovation, contributes to "Building and Leading high-performing remote teams": "It can be helpful for virtual teams to set up some ground rules in the team charter for how teams are going to use technology to communicate and connect," said [Bartol]. "The most important issue is how do you build connectivity when you don't have people meeting face to face?" According to research conducted by Bartol and her colleague N. Sharon Hill, how technology is used in geographically dispersed teams often is more important than the technology itself…when teams match the technology to the task, it helps improve communication and team performance.

Law360 – July 12 - "Libra sparks bipartisan angst, but what can regulators do?" quotes Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi: "This is an area that is not at all well understood. "[Cryptocurrencies] are completely different animals than anything that the banking agencies or any of the other federal oversight agencies deal with or have dealt with in the past," [said Rossi]. "And this is what makes this particularly difficult for any regulatory body to get their arms around…"

Wall Street Journal – July 8 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi contributes to "Carnival, Under Court Order, Gives Compliance Unit More Independence" (regarding its restructuring as part of a $20 million settlement after dumping plastic waste into the ocean and falsifying environmental training records, among other violations): The changes put Carnival in line with a broader shift as big companies increasingly centralize compliance functions and give them more independence, according to Cliff Rossi…

INSEAD Knowledge – July 5 - "The high cost of being private" draws from research co-authored by accounting professor Hanna Lee.

BizEd Magazine – July/August 2019 – Bookshelf section includes review of "Bubbles and Crashes," by management and entrepreneurship professors Brent Goldfarb and David Kirsch.

HR Magazine – Summer 2019 - In "Closing the Gender Pay Gap" Margret Bjarnadottir, assistant professor of management science and statistics, says, and expands on: "I don't think any company goes from a 7 percent gap to zero in one year. It's about how are we going to close it in steps" …Related: Bjarnadottir guest blogs "Addressing Demographic Pay Gaps with Data-driven Solutions," via insideBIGDATA (June 26).

U.S. News & World Report – July 3 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass weighs in with Microsoft as one of "7 Best Retirement Stocks to Buy and Hold": "Microsoft recently leapfrogged Apple (AAPL) as the most valuable U.S. company, after an impressive year in the market. The company is rapidly growing its cloud business, and it has its subscription-based Office 365, giving it an earnings stream that is recurring and consistent."

Forbes – July 1 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudy Lamone Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, writes "When Being Nice is not Kind," explaining why "leaders who care about the long-term growth of their teams are not nice. They are kind instead" … Previous Agarwal column at Forbes: "Why Upward Mobility Needs Markets, Not Just Gadgets" (June 17).

Poets & Quants – July 1 – "Best and Brightest Executive MBAs: Class of 2019" includes profiles of Maryland Smith's Dr. Janis Green and Gretchen MacLeod.

Maryland Daily Record – July 1 - Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass contributes to "Maryland banks join stampede to initiate stock buybacks": For companies struggling to find good investments where their return exceeds their cost of capital, buybacks are also a good option, said David Kass…Amid fluctuating economic conditions -- an uncertain trade war with China -- some companies are repurchasing shares to maintain capital and fend off losses. "There are no winners in a trade war," Kass said. "It might discourage expansion because of the uncertainty of the economics of that industry being adversely affected by tariffs."

June 2019

Jot/Up News – June 28 - Logistics, Business and Public Policy professor Charles Olson weighs the PG&E crisis strategy and "a corporate decision it got right."

Washington Post – June 25 – "8 Ways to Change Your Child's Behavior" includes insight from management professor Rellie Derfler-Rozin: "Derfler-Rozin also recommends thinking about your child's interest rather than their position. Their position might be that they want more screen time, but their interest could relate to a desire to belong, which you could address in other ways."

ComputerWorld – June 20 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments in Facebook's cryptocurrency ratchets up pressure on banks, but has big risks: "Banks and their IT departments, many of which had a wait-and-see approach regarding digital currencies, will need to begin planning how they react or proactively address more widespread use of cryptocurrencies."

STV (Scottish Television) – June 20 – 'Is Scotland ready to become a cashless society?' quotes research professor Joseph Bailey: "It's about the pursuit of anonymity," [Bailey] said. "Most consumers in the United States understand that when they use a payment processing other than just cash, there are ways to go ahead and be identified and tracked. You don't have a ubiquitous adoption of technology and this digital divide which exists between the haves and have-nots is a real concern for policy makers."

Law360 – June 20 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments for "Facebook's Libra Unveiling Spurs Regulatory Uncertainty": "You're talking about now creating a cryptocurrency being tied to a basket of fiat currencies and given the potential reach that Facebook has at this point. If this really took off, there could be a systemic risk."… Rossi also comments in Law360's "Facebook's Libra Prepared to Counter Privacy Concerns" (June 19).

SHRM's HR News – June 19 – Anil K. Gupta, Michael Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship, weighs in on developments affecting China's Belt and Road Initiative, via "China Invests Heavily in Global Infrastructure Projects."

Seeking Alpha - June 19 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives "Top Stocks for Midyear 2019."

Maryland Today – June 19 – In "Will Renting a Shirt or Sofa Save the Planet?" Rachel Sampson, associate professor of business and public policy, advocates a "cradle-to-cradle" strategy, or circular manufacturing. It requires companies to take back products when consumers are done using them and recycle the components or reuse them to make new products. "This will lead to a revolution in terms of redesign, keeping stuff out of landfills, and will have a massive sustainability impact," she said.

Poets & Quants – June 17 – "Best and Brightest Online MBAs: Class of 2019" highlights Maryland Smith's Terri Jarboe Farri's perseverance as a real estate title entrepreneur and includes profiles of Farri and her graduating classmates Joe Costigan and Kathleen Finnegan.

GARP – June 14 – For his latest CRO Outlook column, Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes: "How to Better Understand and Manage Natural Disaster Risks."

Yahoo Finance – June 13 – Maryland Smith experts give "Summer Must-Reads for Leaders."

Investor's Business Daily – June 13 – "Warren Buffett's Net Worth Is Driven By These 'Ironclad' Rules" draws insights from Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: When giving career advice to college students, Buffett says to "find a job you have a passion for because once you are in that path you will be noticed and promoted and stand out from all the others," recalls David Kass…Kass has chronicled many in-person meetings between his students and the Oracle of Omaha dating back to 2005. "Do what you want to do as soon as you can," Kass says Buffett tells students…

Health Gig Podcast – June 12 – "Learn to be the CEO of Your Life" features Rajshree Agarwal, Rudy Lamone Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, sharing her research and methodology on how to live a fulfilling and purposeful life.

Maryland Today – June 11 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd explains Volkswagen's "Hello Light" campaign to 'confront wrongdoing, embrace heyday and promise an innovative future' in "VW's New Ad Campaign Takes Thoughtful Journey From Scandal."

BusinessBecause – June 10 – Associate Dean of Master's Programs Wendy Moe and Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd describe what MBAs should know and are being taught on 'The Dark Side of Digital Technology.'

Reuters – June 10 – "Wall Street Rises on Mexico Relief" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "Both the U.S. economy and the Mexican economy would have been worse off had the tariffs been imposed…Investors are also optimistic today in the hope that the trade war with China will also be resolved in the near future." Republished at Yahoo Finance, others.

Baltimore Sun – June 7 – Information systems professor Henry Lucas writes op-ed explaining cyber risk implications and consequences of the 'U.S. waging war on Huawei.'

LSE (London School of Economics) Blogs – June 6 – MBA student Ryan French writes "Can confidence-building measures repair the mistrust between India and Pakistan?"

Human Resource Executive – June 5 - Management professor Subra Tangirala draws from his research for input to a piece guiding HR leaders to respond to 'Employee activism on the rise': "When people have a larger purpose in mind, they are better engaged"… What's more, when companies make a decision with workers' input, employees "will stand up for the company and what they are doing—that sends a message to the outside world."

Poets&Quants – June 4 – 'Favorite MBA courses of the class of 2019' includes "Global Business UAE," as excerpted from Maryland Smith MBA grad Stephanie Gomez's "Class of 2019 Best and Brightest MBAs" profile published in April by P&Q. Related: Gomez, a former biochemist, is quoted in P&Q's Is the MBA Really as 'Transformative' as Schools Claim?': "I have become confident in my capability to resolve more complex situations and know when to leverage my own personal board of advisors for their wisdom. These are skills that have transformed who I am as a team member, a leader, and as an individual."

Forbes – June 4 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudy Lamone Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, writes "Don't wait for permission to lead yourself" op-ed. Previous Agarwal-Forbes commentaries: "Is envy killing your organization" (May 20) and "Stop counting hours for work-life balance" (May 8).

Fortune – June 4 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass says "[P]residents can have a major impact on the financial markets in the short run" as part of S&P 500 Has Performed Far Worse Under Trump Than Under Obama. Related coverage quoting Kass is published by Stock Market Daily.

CNBC – June 3 – Anil K. Gupta, Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship, is noted among "leading thinkers in the field of innovation and entrepreneurship" who selected the entrepreneurs comprising CNBC's recent Disruptor 50 list.

May 2019

Technical.ly Baltimore – May 29 – Maryland Smith Students Tida Jarjou and Jonathan Ostrosky, via the UM Ventures' Presidential Entrepreneurial Fellowship program, help design a clinical trial for a drug that could be used to treat triple negative breast cancer.

ValueWalk – May 29 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs about 'Kraft Heinz trading below Berkshire Hathaway's purchase price.'

Retail Dive- May 28 – P.K. Kannan, Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Marketing Science, comments extensively for "Stein Mart adds Amazon Lockers to 200 stores."

Wall Street Journal - May 24 - Management and entrepreneurship professor Brent Goldfarb comments in "Wall Street Isn't Buying What Silicon Valley Is Selling": For Uber, Snap and others, the investors were "betting the market will believe the narrative."

Advisory Board – May 22 - Research by management professor Subra Tangirala informs, extensively, 'Why your employees won't speak up.'

TLNT (Talent Management and HR) - May 21 – Management professor Myeong-Gu Seo's recent 'Role of Affect Climate' paper is quoted in "Like It Or Not, No One Is Leaving Their Emotions Home": "If you look at Google, for example, and other good organizations out there, they actually foster and utilize emotion rather than killing it."

Wall Street Journal – May 18 – Evan Starr comments in 'Resistance to noncompete agreements is a win for workers: "It looks like states that choose to enforce noncompetes see declines in mobility, entrepreneurship and wages."

Agence France Presse (via Yahoo News) – May 18 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd comments in "For corporate America, abortion is just too hot to handle": [W]hile "Democrats tend to be more pro-choice... even within the ranks of Democrats about a quarter of them are pro-life." Conversely, about a quarter of Republicans believe in a woman's right to choose. "And if you go to independents, it is almost split right down the middle." Given that deep divide, Boyd added, it is not surprising if business leaders tell themselves, "I don't want to offend half of my base." - 'No comment'

Yahoo Finance– May 16 - Research by Russ Wermers, Bank of America Professor of Finance and Center for Financial Policy director, feeds 'Decrease in Active Management Negatively Impacts Market Efficiency.'

Tadias Magazine – May 15 - 'Brookings Appoints Lemma Senbet to Africa Board' includes "[Senbet, the William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance joins] a panel of select, high-level policymakers, academics and practitioners on African socio-economic development issues."

Quirk's Media - May 14 - An Information Systems Research-published paper co-authored by Professor Gordon Gao and Interim Dean Ritu Agarwal is explained via 'How social media does and doesn't motivate us.'

Baltimore Sun – May 14 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments in 'Baltimore ransomware attack cripples systems vital to real estate deals': "Not just Baltimore City, but most governments don't run themselves as a business and businesses would have a solid business continuity plan in place…They'd have backup systems, dedicated data warehousing for sensitive information."

Maryland Today – May 14 – Career and leadership coach Rachel Loock gives '7 ways to look better on LinkedIn.'

Harvard Business Review Brazil – May 14 - Management professors Subra Tangirala and Vijaya Venkataramani co-author "Why managers ignore employees' opinions."

Maryland Daily Record – May 12 - Clinical Professor of Management Jeffrey Kudisch is the primary source for a profile of Maryland Smith's Gettysburg Experience executive training program that looks at strategies such as teamwork, communication, conflict management and succession planning that leaders used during that fateful 1863 battle and translates those decisions into lessons for today's workplaces and boardrooms.

Poets&Quants – May 11 - Vigneshwaran Ilango and Bill Morton are profiled as MBAs to Watch from the class of 2019.

NBC News (online) – May 10 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for 'Are IPOs more Las Vegas than Wall Street?' "It's the speculative attraction, the excitement, similar to going to Las Vegas to gamble for a big winning… But like Las Vegas, the odds are against you."

GARP – May 9 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes about 'Mitigating the risk of nonbank mortgage lenders and servicers' in his CRO (Chief Risk Officer) Outlook column.

Maryland Today - May 8 - P.K. Kannan, Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Marketing Science, comments on the spread of digital streaming services in 'Why cable is poised for a comeback.'

US News & World Report – May 7 – Kislaya Prasad, research professor and the Academic Director of the Center for Global Business, writes op-ed on 'The Calculus of Doing Business with Repressive Governments.'

Peterson's – May 6 – Clinical Professor of Management Jeffrey Kudisch gives insights for a 'What can I do with a business management degree' blogpost: "People are hiring for the technical skills, but they all want the soft skills. They want [new hires with] emotional intelligence, passion, courage, the ability to think on your feet. All those soft skills, those are what students are able to get with a management major…"

Agence France Presse (via UK's Daily Mail) - May 4 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass's work to engage Maryland Smith students in experiencing the Berkshire Hathaway annual shareholder meeting is highlighted in 'Woodstock for capitalists': [Kass] has made the trip each year for the past decade, sometimes with MBA students, a number of whom were granted private meetings with Buffett…This year he invited 200 of his students to follow the proceedings along with him, broadcast live in one of the university's auditoriums. Related: Kass guest blogs "5 Highlights of the Berkshire Annual Meeting" at Investing.com (May 5) and "10 Highlights of Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Bill Gates on CNBC" via ValueWalk (May 7).

ABC (Australian Broadcasting Corp.) – May 2 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch is the primary expert source for "The history of the electric car is longer than you might think. Related ABC podcast: Kirsch discusses "Electric cars: the burden of history."

Agence France Presse/FranceSoir – May 2 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives insights in "Warren Buffett, a market guru not very keen on new technologies" (English language version via UK's Daily Mail): "A portfolio manager is considered successful when 70% of his bets are profitable, for Warren Buffett it's 90%, which makes him unique," said David Kass..."He remains very classic, he does not use exotic financial products and borrows little." …Warren Buffett has long been reluctant to invest in the technology sector, never buying for example Facebook, Amazon or Google. "He has no expertise in this area and does not see how he could do better than the rest of the market," said Kass.

Diamondback – May 1 – Associate Clinical Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss weighs in for "UMD students aren't getting their hopes up about Elizabeth Warren's student debt plan": …Kiss said she thinks Warren's plan was unlikely to pass in Congress and that instead, there should be greater focus on scholarships, financial literacy courses and programs that allow students to repay their debts through public service. "[Student loan debt] is a problem, but I'm not sure her proposal is the right one," she said.

April 2019

Federal News Radio – April 29 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman and Medallia's Zac Trojak discuss "Restructuring the government's online services," via the IDEA Act – an initiative to modernize government websites, many of which are old and outdated and overlapping in many cases. Listen to more Aberman-hosted "What's Working in Washington" podcasts.

WalletHub – April 27 – Marketing professor Jie Zhang gives cash back credit card advice for consumers in a Q&A.

CNBC – April 27 – Associate Clinical Professor of Management Nicole Coomber comments in "Here's what you can do to get a bigger paycheck if you're hit by the gender wage gap": "Pay is a great thing to look at, but it's just one piece of the whole compensation package." Employees are also generally protected by law if they choose to share their wages or discuss compensation with each other. Other sources, such as professional networks and career websites, can be good sources for gauging where you fall on the pay scale, Coomber said.

BusinessBecause – April 26 – "Why Learning About Big Data Analytics On Your MBA Is The Key To A Career In HR" includes insights from Associate Dean of Masters Programs Wendy Moe and Assistant Professor of Management Science and Statistics Margrét Bjarnadóttir that describe how "a career in HR today means a solid grounding in how to use data analytics to drive decision making; the crux of the MBA at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business."

Forbes – April 25 – Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal writes column titled "Why Leaders Should Push Principles, Not Rules."

Washington Business Journal – April 22 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes "Elected officials need to own the transportation mess."

CMS Wire – April 22 – From "AI Deployments Depend on Human Skills Too": Prithwira Choudhury's paper written with [Maryland Smith management professors Evan Starr and Rajshree Agarwal] suggests that "firms think carefully about the skills they'll need to hire for or train for in employees if they are going to get the most bang for the buck from their new AI."

Barron's – April 19 – "Letters to Barron's on CVS, the Fed, and IPOs" includes comments from Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: …When Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell indicated last October that interest rates were likely to be rising in 2019, the S&P 500 index declined by almost 20% within three months…Only when Powell reversed his position, in January, did the financial markets recover. If interest rates had been higher over the past 10 years, the economy would have experienced lower rates of growth and higher unemployment, and the Great Recession would have lasted longer.

The Hill – April 19 – Clinical Professor of International Business, Global Trade and Supply Chain Management Gary Cohen writes op-ed: "Border closure would affect far more than your avocado toast."

Maryland Today – April 19 – Albert "Pete" Kyle, the Charles E. Smith Chair Professor of Finance, gives insights in "Millennials and the Saving-Too-Little Myth."

Philadelphia Inquirer – April 18 – 'Latest Trends in MBA Degrees' includes input from Assistant Dean of Online Programs Judy Frels: [The flexibility of online appeals to working parents who are older and have more work experiences. "For men and women both, the time when you are most likely to have children also often comes at the prime opportunity for career advancement," said Judy Frels… "You don't want to quit your job and go to a full-time program while raising a family." …Last August, Maryland launched what it calls a micro-master's program covering 25 percent of its online MBA. Students can choose to extend it to a full-time MBA once they finish. "The world changed. People want to learn at their timetable, at their pace," said Frels, at Maryland. "They want stackable credits and smaller chunks of education. They want to learn what they can apply tomorrow."

GARP – April 18 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi's latest CRO Outlook column: "Mortgage Risk: Why we should eliminate the debt-to-income ratio limit."

Chime – April 17 – Blogpost "The Cliffs Notes Guide to Money 101" includes finance professor Oya Altınkılıç giving "borrowing and debt" advice for consumers.

Brookings – April 17 – William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance Lemma Senbet participates in a panel discussion on Financing Africa's economic growth ... Related content: Senbet co-authors a report for Brookings titled "Is sub-Saharan Africa facing another systemic sovereign debt crisis?"

Forbes – April 15 – From "Amazon Goes To Virginia: How Long-Term Thinking Won The HQ2 Prize": "[Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman] is one of the unsung heroes in this narrative. His report on the region's innovation potential surprised a lot of people by highlighting its vibrant M&A market and entrepreneurial culture…"

Detroit News – April 15 – Professor Emeritus Edwin Locke comments in "Top Michigan CEOs made 300 times more than employees": But getting a great chief executive is "priceless" for a company, said [Locke], who has criticized what he calls an "assault on CEO pay. The job is particularly important because if a chief executive does not "do the right things, the whole organization can go bust and other jobs with it," he said. And like a sports superstar, a good CEO "is very hard to find. There is no "objectively correct" ratio between the highest and lowest paid workers at an organization, Locke said. "The objections are just emotional."

Middle Market Growth – April 15 – "After Years-Long Decline in Interest, Business Schools Are Writing a New Lesson Plan" includes: "The cost to enroll in a MicroMasters MBA core curriculum [through Maryland Smith] for example, is less than $1,500."

Maryland Today – April 15 – Management professor Trevor Foulk gives workplace advice in "Should You Talk About "Game of Thrones" at Work?"

The Street – April 12 – "Meet the Economist Who Changed How We Think About How Information Drives Markets" commemorates Albert "Pete" Kyle, the Charles E. Smith Chair Professor of Finance, as the 13th winner of the CME Group-MSRI award, placing him among "an elite group featuring some of the world's top economists (five have gone on to receive the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences)."… Also at Seeking Alpha

O, The Oprah Magazine – April 11 – "Kim Kardashian Wants to Become a Lawyer—Here's Why You're Entitled to a Career Change, Too" includes career and leadership coach Rachel Loock describing research, networking and patience as vital to a successful career change.

MetroMBA – April 11 – Senior Director of MBA and Specialty Master's Programs Admissions Maria Pineda gives responses for "5 Questions with the Senior Director of MBA Admissions at Maryland Smith."

Harvard Business Review – April 8 – Management professors Subra Tangirala and Vijaya Venkataramani co-author 'Why Managers Ignore Employees Ideas'… Republished by PS News (Australia Public Sector News), others.

BizEd – March-April 2019 – Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship Associate Director for Social Entrepreneurship Sara Herald describes, via 'Ladies First' Supports Ladies Who Launch, how the Dingman-based Ladies First initiative works to increase the number of women entrepreneurs.

Seeking Alpha – April 6 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass writes about "Risks and Rewards from Investing in IPOs."

Maryland Today – April 5 – Operations management professor and healthcare analytics expert Sean Barns is part of MarylandAthletics' inaugural Athletic Medicine Review Board. Also at Medical Health News, others.

Federal News Radio – April 5 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman and Fiscal Note's Vladimir Eidelman discuss the role and potential for artificial intelligence in government research work. Listen to previous What's Working in Washington podcasts.

Baltimore Sun – April 4 – Assistant Dean of Online Programs Judy Frels describes Maryland Smith's MicroMasters Program in "New paths for continuing education."

Hospitality.Net – April 4 – Online MBA leadership and change management professor Sheetal Singh co-authors "Understanding the Resistance to Change Within the Hospitality Industry."

Wharton Business Radio – April 2 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd discusses whether Shaq can save the Papa John's brand: "From a purely marketing perspective, picking O'Neal is a "game changer."

BusinessBecause – April 2 – MBA graduate John Masaschi discusses his Maryland Smith experience in 'How Learning About Big Data Analytics Propelled My Career.'

Baltimore Sun – April 2 – Management and entrepreneurship professors David Kirsch and Brent Goldfarb co-author op-ed "Lyft may be awesome, but is its business?"... Republished by New York Newsday, Australian Financial Review, others.

The Street – April 1 – Finance professor Albert "Pete" Kyle receives the CME Group-MSRI Prize In Innovative QuantitativeApplications.

ValueWalk – April 1 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs a review of the recent CNBC-Warren Buffett interview… Previous Kass piece at ValueWalk updates Berkshire Hathaway's Stoneco Ltd. Stake.

Techonomy – April 1 – Adjunct professor Ryan Guttridge co-authors "Why Breaking up Big Tech Isn't the Answer"… Previous Guttridge piece at Techonomy: "What's Missing from Pinterest's IPO" (March 22).

WalletHub – April 1 – Management and organization clinical professor Oliver Schlake gives insights for consumers into 0% APR credit cards.

March 2019

New York Times – March 29 – Career and Leadership Coach Rachel Loock contributes to "What to do when you're bored with your routines": "Changes don't need to be large to have an impact. Simply accessorizing your desk with fresh flowers or approaching a work project in a novel way can make a difference."

Washington Post – March 29 – Management and entrepreneurship professor Brent Goldfarb comments in As IPO soars, can Uber and Lyft survive long enough to replace their drivers with computers?: "Lyft has created a narrative of an imagined future…The vision is of "a fleet of cars that drive themselves for less than what they're currently paying the drivers. That's what has to happen."

US News and World Report – March 28 – Research Professor Kislaya Prasad writes op-ed "The Fight Over Kashmir Has Business Consequences."

Chicago Tribune – March 26 – Research Professor Joseph Bailey gives insights on cashless transactions in "Family finances: How much cash is in your wallet?"

Washington Business Journal – March 26 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes "4 things the new Fairfax County EDA chief must do."

Mother Nature Network – March 25 – "Why I love spending time alone" cites marketing professor Rebecca Ratner's research into solo consumerism:

Bloomberg – March 22 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for "Buffett's Course Reversal on Airlines Sparks Talk of Acquisition: "One of those airlines would certainly be affordable and do-able" if Berkshire wanted to buy. "But then the question is, would Buffett really want to do that."

BusinessBecause – March 22 – Senior Director of MBA Admissions Maria Pineda and MBA student Erick Loyo give insights to getting into Maryland Smith's MBA program.

U.S. News & World Report – March 21 – Associate Dean of Graduate Programs Wendy Moe and Ramya Mure, a master's in information systems graduate, describe how STEM courses enhance Maryland Smith's master's programs.

Wealth Management – March 20 – "Active Managers Contribute to an Efficient Market" summarizes finance professor Russell Wermers new research: "Investors benefit from active managers in a way that's often overlooked. Wermers examines the activities of active managers and how they contribute to the efficiency of the public markets"… Related coverage at Traders Magazine

Harvard Business Review – March 20 – Marketing professors P.K. Kannan and Liye Ma co-author "How Companies Can Get the Most Out of a Freemium Business Model."

Wharton Business Radio – March 19 – Management and entrepreneurship professors Brent Goldfarb and David Kirsch discuss their book, "Bubbles and Crashes: The Boom and Bust of Technological Innovation."

Industrial Distribution – March 19 – Professor of the Practice in Business Analytics Suresh Acharya writes about 'Three Types of Analytics to Address Supply Chain Disruptions.'

BusinessBecause – March 18 – "Are Coursera Courses Worth The Effort?" highlights Maryland Smith's Online MS in Business Analtyics program as "another 100%-online [offering] delivering business school expertise [in subject areas] especially popular among MOOC-takers. The program complements Smith's roster of eight specialized masters, across topics like finance, accounting, and supply chain management."

American Banker – March 15 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments for What's behind OCC's public rebuke of Wells Fargo?: "It's almost like the OCC is trying to cover themselves now to say they are the tough regulator, which calls attention away from how they were deficient in oversight of Wells in the past."

Maryland Today – March 15 – Operations management professor and analytics expert Sean Barnes gives NCAA tournament bracket advice in "A Method to March Madness."

GARP – March 15 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes "How to Reduce Risk from Credit Reporting Companies."

AACSB blog – March 14 – Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies Victor Mullins guest blogs "Students Aren't Fully Prepared for Today's Workplace—We Can Change That."

Wharton Business Radio – March 12 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass discusses whether Kraft Heinz can catch up with its changing market.

Guyana News Chronicle – March 8 – In a "Much Room for Progress" International Women's Day editorial, management professor Subra Tangirala's research is referenced: "From a set of four studies, [Tangirala] has revealed that men often refrain from participating in, or speaking up about gender parity initiatives because they experience lowered levels of psychological standing than women; that is, they feel that it is not their place to engage with those initiatives."

Kiplinger's Personal Finance – March 7 – Associate Research Professor Joseph Bailey discusses the pros and cons of a cashless society in "America Lurches Toward a Cashless Future" … Also covered by Maryland Today.

SiriusXM's Wharton Business Radio – March 7 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd contributes as an expert panelist for "Goodbye, Greeters: Can Walmart Calm Its Latest Controversy?"

Autonomous Vehicle Technology – March 6 – Management and entrepreneurship professor David Kirsch writes "What to expect (and what not to expect) from the electric Ford F-150."

BBC Radio – March 6 – Assistant Professor of Management Science and Statistics Margrét Bjarnadóttir describes how a company can tackle its gender pay gap, via a Wake Up to Money segment (starting at 07:10).

Maryland Today – March 6 – Associate Clinical Professor of Management Nicole Coomber moderates a Women Leading Women forum conversation with business leader and Smith MBA graduate Carly Fiorina, yielding "5 keys to find your way."

Washington Business Journal – March 6 –Entrepreneurship Lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes "Some people want to kick government out of the tech equation. This would be disastrous." Previous Aberman-WBJ column: 3 Dangers to the region's economy" (Feb. 11).

Autonomous Vehicle Technology Magazine – March 6 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch writes 'What to expect from the electric Ford F150.'

Federal News Radio – March 6 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman hosts a segment exploring the concept of linking government problems with private solutions. Listen to previous Aberman-hosted What's working in Washington segments.

February 2019

Maryland Today – Feb. 27 – Accounting Lecturer Samuel Handwerger explains the Tax changes surprising filers this year."

News @ Northeastern – Feb. 26 – Groundbreaking research into spinout companies co-authored by Rajshree Agarwal, the Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship, is newly expanded and reviewed in "Here's What Inspires Tech Entrepreneurs, and why Their Startups Succeed."

Crain's Chicago Business – Feb. 26 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd comments for "Outcome [Health] Hangs in the Balance" -- on CEO Matt McNally's effort to resuscitate the struggling health technology and advertising unicorn: To win them back, "he'll need to tell them, 'There's a new sheriff in town' and 'Here's what we've done to clean up the corporate culture…But rebuilding trust is going to come down to the numbers. It's trust, but verify."

Techonomy – Feb. 26 – Adjunct professor Ryan Guttridge co-authors "Why the Big Cap Tech is Big." Previous Guttridge co-authored piece: "Why Amazon Keeps Winning."

New York Times – Feb. 25 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments in "Kraft Tests How Much Costs Can Be Cut as Tastes Change": "They did not anticipate this major change in consumer tastes, and they really focused their efforts instead on cost-cutting and doing acquisitions."

Bloomberg – Feb. 22 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for "Warren Buffett's Big Consumer Bets Bite Back": "This is something that is more of a long-term problem, a major shift in consumer taste and sentiment…Very few people saw this coming, including Warren Buffett and including 3G Capital." Republished by the Omaha World-Herald and others… Related: Kass guest blogs "5 quotes from Warren Buffett's letter to shareholders," via ValueWalk.

Analytics Insight (India) – Feb. 22 – Associate Dean of Master's Programs Wendy Moe explains how Maryland Smith 'Imparts data science education to develop data driven professionals.'

Quirk's Media – Feb. 20 – Patricia Reich, assistant dean and executive director of the Office of Career Services, describes "5 red flags to avoid in your next interview."

Maryland Today – Feb. 18 – Brent Goldfarb and David Kirsch, associate professors of management and entrepreneurship, give insights from their new book, "Bubbles and Crashes: The Boom and Bust of Technological Innovation," in "Exploring Bubble Trouble."

Agence France-Presse – Feb. 17 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd comments for "US millennials a popular but elusive target for brands": ...Boyd, however, believes that the demographic approach remains effective. If "I know your hometown, I know your gender, I know what socioeconomic class you grew up" in, that gives "me a clearer picture of who you are and how I might want to craft a message…It's having a hundred data points on customers that really allows you to say, I have the sense that we're forming an amazing relationship with our customers."

Investing.com – Feb. 15 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "Berkshire Hathaway Added Red Hat, Suncor Energy, StoneCo To Portfolio."

GARP CRO Report – Feb. 15 – Professor of the Practice in Finance Clifford Rossi writes: "Risk Management Lessons from the Wells Fargo Report."

Forbes – Feb. 13 – Associate Professor of Business and Public Policy Rachelle Sampson is cited in "A new way to teach management": I've learned that long-term creativity from an equitably compensated workforce is the heart of the new leadership. So it was encouraging to read a piece from my alma mater, by Rachelle Sampson and Witold Henisz, in Stanford Social Innovation Review, advocating a new way of teaching business for long-term sustainability.

Inside Philanthropy – Feb. 12 – Executive-in-Residence William Longbrake's career and philanthropy is featured in 'Retired executive takes a hands-on approach to giving."

Recconomics – Feb. 10 – Logistics, Business and Public Policy Senior Research Fellow and Adjunct Professor Carlos Alvarenga writes "The class ceiling and the myth of meritocracy."

The Hill – Feb. 7 – "Academic says US immigration system should cater to both current and aspiring citizens" features insights from Rajshree Agarwal, the Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship.

Maryland Today – Feb. 5 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd III ranks the Super Bowl 53 telecast's most memorable commercials.

Federal News Radio – Feb. 4 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman discusses AI and machine learning as poised to change the economy, with tech research and advisory firm OODA co-founders. Listen to previous Aberman-hosted What's Working in Washington segments.

Recconomics – Feb. 3 – Logistics, Business and Public Policy Senior Research Fellow and Adjunct Professor Carlos Alvarenga writes "The Hard Truth About Innovative Cultures."

Wall Street Journal – Feb. 1 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi, comments in "Wells Fargo Breaks Down Internal Audit Silos to Fend Off Scandals": It is impossible to know if the changes can stave off future scandals at the bank, said Cliff Rossi..."A lot will remain to be seen as to how well they execute."

Bisnow – Feb. 1 – Maryland Smith's role is highlighted in "Inside WeWork's First Location On A College Campus": WeWork is also partnering with the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at UMD's Robert H. Smith School of Business, which has bought a series of hot desk memberships for its students looking to launch startup companies.

January 2019

Baltimore Sun – Jan. 30 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd III comments on effective messaging in Super Bowl ads: Humorous ads often work well, he said, but the best commercials tend to tell a story, inspire and get people talking, instead of lecturing about a product. "Every now and then, they can do something remarkable and inspiring," Boyd said. "Those are rare, but advertisers shoot for them."

ValueWalk – Jan. 30 – Anil K. Gupta, Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship, comments extensively through "Under Globalization 4.0, Connectedness Strong And Getting Stronger."

Knowledge @ Wharton – Jan. 29 – Associate Dean of Master's Programs Wendy Moe's co-authored paper 'What Leads to Longer Reads?' is referenced in "Factual, or Warm and Fuzzy? Why Choosing the Right Words Matters."

Spend Matters – Jan. 28 - Professor of the Practice Suresh Acharya gives supply chain analytics insight in "McDonald's Supply Chain May Set Bar on Sourcing Antibiotic-Free Beef."

Ladders – Jan. 27 – Management and organization professor Myeong-Gu Seo's research is cited in "Your emotional culture is powerful – you just need to listen": Workplaces, where employees feel comfortable expressing their feelings, tend to be more productive, creative and innovative…That's the key finding of studies by [Seo].

Washington Business Journal – Jan. 24 – Entrepreneurship Lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes: "We're not Silicon Valley. "We should stop using its entrepreneurship model." Read previous Aberman columns at WBJ.

Sirius XM Business Radio/Knowledge @ Wharton – Jan. 24 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Henry C. Boyd III weighs in as a guest expert for "Did Gillette Miss the Mark with Its Toxic Masculinity Ad?"

Active Cyber – Jan. 23 – Blog reviews the annual Maryland Smith-co-hosted Forum on Financial Information Systems and Cybersecurity – organized by Accounting and Information Assurance professors Lawrence Gordon and Martin Loeb.

Agence France-Presse – Jan. 23 – Accounting and information assurance professor Tharindra Ranasinghe comments in "10 years after crisis, bank CEO pay swells again": The public's view of the higher pay has been muted somewhat by improvement in the broader economy that has strengthened employment markets.

Harvard Business Review – Jan. 21 – Associate professor of Business and Public Policy Cristian Dezso and Assistant Professor of Management Science and Statistics Margrét V. Bjarnadóttir co-author "Why Companies' Attempts to Close the Gender Pay Gap Often Fail."

Bloomberg – Jan. 19 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship David Kirsch comments in "Why Tesla's Long Model 3 Waitlist Could Be a Massive Problem" Musk should be satisfied he's been able to create an electric-vehicle rival to Porsche, said David Kirsch…Tesla is attempting a technological Hail Mary by putting what are still-expensive batteries in cars and trying to sell them at mass-market prices, he said. "Musk is living in a fantasy world."

GARP – Jan. 18 –Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes "Strategic risk will be front and center in 2019," in a CRO Outlook column.

CNN - January 17 – Maryland Smith's Supply Chain Management Center heads a UMD-Resilinc joint study referenced in Climate is the biggest risk to business (and the world): "Climate disasters point to several areas where businesses face increased risks. The first is supply chains. A report from University of Maryland and software firm Resilinc showed that global supply chain disruptions caused by weather doubled in 2017."

Associated Press – Jan. 17 – "Automation, Intermediation and the Flash Crash" – co-authored by Albert "Pete" Kyle, Charles E. Smith Chair Professor of Finance, is among 2018 Harry M. Markowitz Award Winners.

Forbes – Jan. 16 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship, writes: "Why Low-Skilled Workers will Win in the Robot Revolution."

WTOP – Jan. 15 – Maryland Smith's Online MBA Program is cited as top-ranked among peer programs offered by universities in DC, Maryland and Virginia according to U.S. News and World Report.

MetalMiner – Jan. 15 – "Measuring Risk in the World of Climate Change" documents the development of climate change risk index for supply chains, co-led by Maryland Smith's Supply Chain Management Center including research professor Sandor Boyson: "We have [UMD's] business school and Silicon Valley-based partner, Resilinc, joining forces with a university-based climate change center [ESSIC] that's linked directly to the federal government [NOAA] and its long-term climate prediction center," said Sandor Boyson… "We're positioned to make an index that in its initial phase will score and rank some 10,000 Resilinc-monitored production locations worldwide for vulnerability to climate change."

Harvard Business Review – Jan. 14 – Management professor Subra Tangirala co-authors "Why Open Secrets Exist in Organizations."

WalletHub – Jan. 11 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi gives consumer credit card advice in a Q&A.

Vice Magazine – Jan. 2 – Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship Brent Goldfarb is a source in "What a Student Loan 'Bubble' Bursting Might Look Like": Brent Goldfarb explained that the easiest way to understand a bubble is to think about a stock that people keep buying mostly because other people are doing the same thing. This usually happens when a company or product has a compelling narrative around it that isn't backed up by data.

December 2018

Bloomberg Law – Dec. 28 – Accounting professor Tharindra Ranasinghe comments in "Microsoft, CVS to Explain How Worker Pay Factors into CEO's": "Right now, it's hard to figure out who the worker is unless the company specifically talks about it, and they're not required to talk about it"…Most companies took a less-is-more approach to the first round of disclosures and Ranasinghe says they're likely to do the same in 2019.

Recconomics – Dec. 28 – Logistics Business and Public Policy adjunct professor Carlos Alvarenga's Reconn Reader blogpost highlights articles in the past seven days reflecting a global view of economics, business and society, from the likes of Wired, Bloomberg and The Economist.

Washington Post – Dec. 27 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for "Tech Stocks Have Sold Off Sharply -- Is It a Blip, or Something More?": "There's the psychology of the market, maybe even an element of panic entering investment decisions…I still think technology stocks remain the leaders because that's where the growth is, but valuations have come down, as they should have."

Techonomy – Dec. 28 - Adjunct finance professor Ryan Guttridge contributes to "2019 Market Predictions: Apple and Amazon Bounce, China Caves"… Previous Guttridge-Techonomy contribution: "What Tech Investors Get Wrong about Privacy."(Dec. 17)

Washington Business Journal – Dec. 24 – Entrepreneurship Lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes about 'Lessons local leaders learned this year.' Previous Aberman-WBJ columns: 'Erosion of optimism is cause for concern' (Dec. 13), 'Why data breaches like at Marriott so common' (Dec. 6).

Media Post/Marketing Insider – Dec. 21 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd describes "2018's Marketing Hits and Misses."

GARP Newsletter – Dec. 21 - Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes "The FDIC's Obsession with Brokered Deposits is Misplaced and Outdated." Also at GARP (Dec. 14): Rossi comments for "A Fresh Look at Three Lines of Defense": Big-bank standards tend to filter out to other segments of the industry, but [Clifford Rossi] says that smaller banks and credit unions "have struggled with implementing" the three-lines framework…

Federal News Radio – Dec. 21 – Entrepreneurship Lecturer Jonathan Aberman discusses innovation in government contracting, with Precise Software Solutions founder Zhensen Huang as part of the What's Working in Washington series.

20 Minutes (France newspaper) – Dec. 20 – Management and entrepreneurship professor Brent Goldfarb comments for "Has the bitcoin bubble exploded in 2018?": With a question that inevitably arises: were we facing a bubble, and it exploded this year? "Yes and yes, without hesitation," says Brent Goldfarb, a professor of entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland, co-author of Bubbles and Crashes In mid-2017, we entered the phase of "irrational exuberance," an expression used by the former boss of the American Fed Alan Greenspan in the 90s. "In technological bubbles, we often see extreme optimism about the speed of change and its inevitability," says Goldfarb.

WAMU – Dec. 20 - Entrepreneurship Lecturer Jonathan Aberman gives input to "How Amazon Could Usher in Big Changes For Washington's Tech Industry": …The local tech sector is generally constrained to the lesser-known world of government contracting. Amazon could help change that, Aberman says, even if it doesn't actually design mass-market products like the Echo here.

WalletHub – Dec. 19 – Associate Clinical Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss gives personal finance-based do's and don'ts of New Year's resolution-making.

Poets&Quants – Dec. 19 – Maryland Smith (with a 4.20 average) is highlighted among the top five schools for "Average High School GPAs at the Top B-Schools."

Forbes – Dec. 17 – Rajshree Agarwal, the Rudy Lamone Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy, writes about 'Three games tech CEOs play with protectionism.' Previous Agarwal-Forbes column: "Don't Be Evil: Crisis of Consciousness Puts Googliness at Stake" (Dec. 6).

CEO Magazine - Dec. 17 – Management professor Jennifer Carson Marr gives "11 Tips to Avoid Office Party Pitfalls."

ValueWalk – Dec. 14 –Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass describes 'Stocks to watch in 2019.'

Washington Post – Dec. 14 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for "A Year After Their Tax Cuts, How Have Corporations Spent the Windfall?": Companies also increased research and development spending by 34 percent, to nearly $175 billion, in the first three quarters of this year…"The tax cut was very worthwhile for business," said David Kass.

Washington Post Express - Dec. 12 - "Want to Get a Job at HQ2? These Local Graduate Programs can Help" highlights, via input from logistics professor Thomas M Corsi, Maryland Smith's graduate programs in supply chain management as a source for filling Amazon H2Q jobs.

ClickZ – Dec. 6 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan, in a guest piece, writes about "The impact of Increased Amazon Presence in Digital Advertising."

MBA Crystal Ball – Dec. 3 – Assistant Dean of MBA and MS Admissions Cliff McCormick, in a Q&A, gives insight for prospective students, via "Questions to ask College and University Representatives."

Her Campus - Dec. 2 - Finance lecturer Michael Padhi describes a potential paradox of expansion by College Park fusion restaurant The Board and Brew: "If the expansion makes everyone more prosperous, then I would expect greater property values, and property tax revenue to rise. But, I could also imagine that an expansion could make a city less desirable to live in, which could reduce property values."

November 2018

Virginian Pilot/Hampton Roads Business Journal – Nov. 30 - Career and executive coach Rachel Loock writes "Questions to ask Before Joining a Nonprofit Board."

Washington Post - Nov. 30 - Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass gives a long-view perspective for 'Microsoft overtakes Apple': Technology and capitalism take their toll, said David Kass…"Of the original 12 stocks in the Dow Jones industrial average in 1896, only General Electric survives today — just barely" … And in time, "Apple and Microsoft will also be eclipsed."

Poets&Quants - Nov. 30 - Clinical Professor of Accounting Progyan Basu and Logistics Business and Public Policy Professor of the Practice Charles Olson are featured among "Favorite Professors Of Executive MBAs" – based on a testimonial comments from Maurice Andrew Malcolm, '18.

Washington Business Journal - Nov. 29 - Entrepreneurship Lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes "A milestone gives me a moment to reflect," regarding his What's Working in Washington podcast's guest-expert insights for career and enterprise growth… Previous Aberman-WBJ columns: 'We won Amazon, but there's work to do' (Nov. 15), 'Gen. McChrystal's view of leadership' (Nov. 8).

ValueWalk – Nov. 29 – Management and entrepreneurship professor David Kirsch describes General Motors' Aggressive Retrenchment and Reboot Strategy. Republished by TalkMarkets.

American Journal of Transportation – Nov. 29 – Maryland Smith's Supply Chain Management Center is helping lead an initiative by UMD researchers and Resilinc, Inc., to create a climate change risk index of supply chains. Also reported at Inside Logistics, Phys.org, UMD Right Now and Science Magazine.

MIT Sloan Management Review – Nov. 26 – From essay "Think Critically About the Wisdom of Experts": In a Strategic Management Journal article, my coauthor [Maryland Smith management and entrepreneurship professor] Brent Goldfarb and I estimate, very roughly, that about 20% of the research findings in business management are based on little more than random noise.

Techonomy - Nov. 26 - Adjunct finance professor Ryan Guttridge contributes to 'Why FAANGs Are Down As Smartphone Boom Wanes' op-Ed.

Washington Business Journal - Nov. 23 - Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi on what disappearing bank branches mean for small business: "It's a high-touch, look-the-borrower-in-the-eyes and look-at-what-their-needs-are sort of thing," said Rossi. "A lot of times, there is no substitute for being able to understand what small business owners' needs are and what their market penetration is, [information] that you can't get any other way than having somebody with a local presence."

Associated Press - Nov. 21 - Kathryn Bartol, Robert H. Smith Professor in Management and Organization, on factors into a "Maryland Tech Company Pays Employees to Volunteer": "It's a chance for the employees, for people in the company, to kind of engage with each other and sometimes break down silos," Bartol said. Coordinated activities are more the trend among other businesses, Bartol said, because it helps make their community service more visible. "It's more attractive for companies to do things that help them be helpful, and be seen as helpful in the community." Also published by U.S. News & World Report, the Miami Herald, Charlotte Observer, Baltimore Sun and others.

Reconomics - Nov. 21 - Logistics, Business and Public Policy adjunct professor Carlos Alvarenga writes "Why Work Should Not Define You."

Analytics Magazine - Nov. 20 - Bruce Golden, the France-Merrick Chair in Management Science, is awarded the George E. Kimball Medal, from the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), for distinguished service to the Institute and to the profession of operations research and the management sciences.

Federal News Radio - Nov. 19 - Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman hosts an expert panel on What Amazon's HQ2 really means for Virginia. Go to What's Working in Washington for additional, such podcasts.

Tadias - Nov. 15 - Lemma Senbet, the William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance, discusses the Ethiopian Diaspora Trust Fund, an initiative he is organizing.

Kiplinger - Nov. 15 - A '10 Stocks Buffett is Buying and 6 he's Selling' slideshow quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass from his previous analysis on "Warren Buffett abandoning Walmart."

Forbes - Nov. 15 - Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship,

writes "Why Amazon Runs Toward Government with HQ2." Also at Forbes, Agarwal authored "Caravan To Nowhere: Five Fallacies That Stall Immigration Discourse" (Nov. 12).

Maryland Today - Nov. 15 - Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass describes How Amazon HQ2 Will Affect the Region—Including UMD.

Globe and Mail - Nov. 14 - Bank of America Professor of FinanceRuss Wermers' research is highlighted by coauthor Lisa Kramer at the University Toronto in "Financial Markets Can Suffer the Blues, Too": …Contributions in and out of mutual funds vary over the course of the year in a manner consistent with these seasonal fluctuations in risk preferences. In the fall, when many investors are shunning risk, they tend to be directing their dollars toward relatively safe mutual funds, and then in the spring, when investors' taste for risk rebounds, capital flows lean toward riskier mutual funds.

Change This - Nov. 14 - Mindful Leadership Lecturer Laurie J. Cameron guest blogs The Key to Resilience? A Positive Outlook.

Poets&Quants - Nov. 13 – Professor of Business Law Leigh Anenson is recognized and profiled as a 'Top 50 Undergraduate Business Professor.'

DC Inno - Nov. 13 - Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman weighs in on Amazon H2Q in Greater Washington.

BFM 89.9 (Malaysia's "The business station") - Nov. 8 - In a "Big Solutions for Globalizing the World" segment, Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Anil K. Gupta discusses China's influence, the effects of globalization and the rise of artificial intelligence in business.

ValueWalk - Nov. 8 - Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass explains What the Midterm Election Means for Stocks. Previously from Kass at ValueWalk: '5 Highlights of Berkshire Hathaway's Third Quarter Report' (Nov. 3)

Times Higher Education - Nov. 7 - G. Anand Anandalingham, Ralph J. Tyser Professor of Management Science, on why 'B-School Research Should Focus on 'Big Issues': "I think the research agenda [in business schools] is too narrow and too focused on what the corporate world can do in the next year or two, we're not working on the big issues," [Anandalingham] told the Chartered Association of Business Schools' annual conference. "We need to capture the imagination of the public at large. If you show what you're doing is topical and relevant, money will come in."

Garage to Goliath - Nov. 6 - Podcast features Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship, discussing 'Entrepreneurship v. Intrapreneurship and Why We Need Leaders in Both Arenas.'

Diplomatic Courier - Nov. 6 - Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Anil K. Gupta weighs in on applying ethics in artificial intelligence, via "A.I. for Good": "Engineers should receive a core ethics training. Similar to how business students must take core ethic classes during their undergraduate and graduate degrees."

American Banker – Nov. 5 - Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi on 'Citi keeping the CEO and Chairman Roles Separate': Corbat can focus more of his attention on improving the company's financial results. "They've done a ton of work over the past 10 years to right the ship, and Corbat should be very pleased with his performance… Still, he added, keeping an independent chairman on board also sends the message that Citi's turnaround, following its near-collapse during the crisis, isn't quite finished.

Maryland Public Television - Nov. 5 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd discusses the power of political advertising in an election eve edition of MPT News' Direct Connection.

New York Magazine - Nov. 5 - Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Anil K. Gupta on How China Drove Out Mister Softee: "The foreign companies that are still very welcome in China are the ones that bring technology or know-how" that China hasn't developed on its own, Gupta said. "If you don't, then increasingly you are not all that welcome."

Sirius XM Business Radio/Knowledge@Wharton - Nov. 2 - Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan discusses, via 'The Twisted Path to Purchase,' how companies can leverage the trend of consumers researching on their mobile devices then purchasing from their desktops.

Washington Post – Nov. 2 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for "Why GE's Penny Dividend Signals a Sad Turn for Widow and Orphan Stocks": "Widow and orphan stocks were designated as such for their safety and income…In the past, they included utilities and regulated monopolies, such as AT&T, Con Edison, Exxon, Texaco, General Motors, Eastman Kodak and IBM… [Warren] Buffett likes to invest in companies that pay dividends…His policy is not to pay dividends, but to own companies that do pay them."

Federal News Radio – Nov. 2 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman interviews Kaleyra Head of Strategy Terry Hsiao for an "Insights from one of texting's innovators" segment in the What's Working in Washington series.

Hershey – Nov. 2 – Blogpost summarizes Clinical Professor of Management and Organization Oliver Schlake's recent presentation at the National Association of Convenience Stores Show in Las Vegas describing how convenience stores can be part of the tech-driven "Industrial Revolution 4.0."

Washington Business Journal – Nov. 1 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes "What do investors like about investing in D.C.? I asked them" … Previous Aberman-WBJ columns: "Can you teach people to be innovative? Yes, here's how" (Oct. 25), "These companies give me hope for our region" (Oct. 18), "You want funding? Follow this Advice" (Oct. 11), "I took a trip to digital purgatory. I barely escaped" (Oct. 4).

October 2018

Wall Street Journal – Oct. 29 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass weighs in on why "Warren Buffett's Firm Invests Millions in Fintech": "Todd [Combs] and Ted [Weschler] bring additional expertise to the table…They're broadening the perspective of Berkshire and broadening the opportunities where they would look to invest."

CNBC – Oct. 29 – Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship Anil K. Gupta explains why the recently signed India-Japan currency swap is "a good move" and will help in stabilizing the Indian rupee.

Forbes - Oct. 29 – Poets & Quants editor John Byrne highlights Smith's Online MBA Program among programs with above-the-median scores in three indicators (promotions, pay increases and changed jobs) that show "the best online MBA programs are delivering pretty solid career outcomes.

GARP CRO Outlook – Oct. 26 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes "The Collateral Valuation Battle: Will Technological Improvements Actually Lead to Greater Mortgage Risk?"

BusinessBecause – Oct. 25 – Assistant Dean of Online Programs Judy Frels contributes to "How Business Schools are Teaching Big Data Analytics": "Students get hands-on, in-depth training on the latest tools and methods for dealing with large, messy, complex datasets. As we're teaching them each tool, we include practice with increasingly 'real' sets of data, where the data becomes more and more like what they would encounter in the real world."

Forbes – Oct. 24 – Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship Rajshree Agarwal and Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs Victor Mullins co-author "Beware Of California's Diversity Short-Termism."

Investor's Business Daily – Oct. 19 - Clinical Professor of Supply Chain Management and International Business Gary Cohen writes "Global Companies Have A Big Stake In U.S.' Economic Success."

Barron's - Oct. 16 – "Will a Fragile Banking System Survive Future Runs?" cites a 2016 publication of "Runs on Money Market Mutual Funds" in American Economic Review co-authored by Bank of America Professor of Finance Russ Wermers.

Tadias Magazine – Oct. 12 – William E. Mayer Chair Professor of Finance Lemma Senbet's recent tenure with the African Economic Research Consortium is reviewed as he helps lead the Ethiopian Diaspora Trust Fund Advisory Council.

Security Boulevard – Oct 9 – Smith IT system and network engineer Christopher Gleeson comments for blogpost "Spanning Backup Has Data Protection Covered": "Using Spanning Backup has allowed me to focus my time and energy on improving and developing new services for our users and community, comfortable that the 'headache' of data protection is being handled so well and so thoroughly."

Washington Post – Oct. 5 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments in "Larry Culp's long to-do list to fix GE": Culp will need to decide whether to fix GE's power division or scrap it. [David Kass] thinks he should sell it because of its "substantial" underperformance…The remainder of GE can then be turned around…GE should become a smaller company."

Today's Motor Vehicles – Oct. 2 - Clinical Professor of Supply Chain Management and International Business Gary Cohen comments for "U.S., Canada agree to new NAFTA terms": …the use of white-collar wages to offset low production costs in Mexico "creates an advantage for U.S. automakers, over their German, Japanese and Korean counterparts, because of the amount of research and development done in an automaker's headquarter countries."

U.S. News and World Report – Oct. 2 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass contributes to "Why Investors Love the S&P 500": "2019 is likely to lead to another record year for the S&P 500…Corporate profits continue to grow and interest rates remain at historically low levels – even after three or four quarterly increases of a quarter percent by the Federal Reserve."

CIO Magazine – Oct. 1 –The Decision, Operations and Information Technologies department, plus a focus on business analytics, positions Smith's MBA program as among the "U.S. Top 10 technology-focused MBA programs."

September 2018

GARP-CRO Outlook – Sept. 28 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi writes "How to Avoid the Next Crisis: Motivating Banks to Improve Risk Management."

Washington Business Journal – Sept. 27 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes "Why quantum computing could be the next big thing in [the D.C.] region." Previous Aberman-WBJ columns: 'Neil deGrasse Tyson sees hope for D.C. area innovation' (Sept. 13), 'Tandem Product Academy launch' (Sept. 6).

WAMU – Sept. 26 – Business communication expert Tricia Homer describes a "Seven-minute public speaking warm-up"… Previous Smith expert-WAMU posts: "Seven career transition tips from Usain Bolt" (Rachel Loock and Evan Starr, Sept. 19), "Answering HQ2's Call, With Or Without Amazon" (Jonathan Aberman, Sept. 12), "To The Mattresses: How A Disruption Is Being Turned On Its Head" (P.K. Kannan, Sept. 5).

Hopitality.net – Sept. 26 – Marketing professor Roland Rust summarizes a recent study in co-authoring "Anticipated Versus Actual Use of Amenities."

Federal News Radio – Sept. 26 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman hosts an expert panel discussion on how outside firms perceive D.C.'s government contracting industry… For additional Aberman-hosted segments, go to "What's Working in Washington."

Credit Union Journal – Sept. 26 - Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments in 'Credit unions fire back at CRA plan': "[The Community Reinvestment Act] creates "incentives for lenders to relax credit standards beyond prudent risk-taking…"

Stanford Social Innovation Review – Sept. 25 – Logistics, Business and Public Policy professor Rachelle Sampson co-authors "Redesigning Management Education for the Long Term."

Sports Illustrated – Sept. 25 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd comments in "Bold Face: Nike is Banking on Colin Kaepernick" (scroll down): "There is going to be some cost there, but Nike is looking five, 10 years down the line…You want a change agent, and he is the change agent for this generation."

Magnify Money – Sept. 21 – A review of Status Money (a financial management and budgeting free service) references related research by finance professors Alberto Rossi and Francesco D'Acunto.

TWICE: The Business of Consumer Electronics – Sept. 18 – Marketing professor P.K. Kannan writes "Can Brick-And-Mortar Keep Up With Automated Retail?"

Science Magazine – Sept. 15 – "Researchers develop method for video promo clips via facial expression tracking" overviews research by marketing professor Michel Wedel… Related coverage via Pressetext (Austria) and the American Marketing Association's (blog) Optimizing Video for Emotional Impact… Also from AMA: Wedel is profiled as a special issue editor for the Journal of Marketing's forthcoming examination of new technologies disrupting marketing and the marketplace.

New York Times – Sept. 14 - Smith School affiliate psychology professor Michele Gelfand's new book, "Is Your Culture 'Tight' or 'Loose'?" is reviewed… Related guest columns by Gelfand: "Is Your Organization Tight or Loose? How to Tell—and Ways to Fix It" (Fortune) and "Here's the science behind the Brexit vote and Trump's rise" (The Guardian).

Harvard Business Review – Sept. 13 – Management professor Trevor Foulk co-authors "How Self-Reflection Can Help Leaders Stay Motivated."

National Affairs – Sept. 13 – "Fitting In" blog reviewing new research highlights Logistics, Business and Public Policy professor Cristian Dezső's "The Gender Composition of Firms and Risk-Taking Behavior: Evidence from Mutual Funds."

ValueWalk – Sept. 13 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass' "Jeff Bezos interview at the Economic Club of Washington" blog is republished.

Baltimore Sun – Sept. 12 – Marketing professor Jie Zhang comments for 'German grocer Lidl opens first Maryland location': "Lidl's success is driven in part by its ability to remain attractive to financially secure consumers while setting prices within reach of low-income consumers."

All About Alpha – Sept. 11 – "Connection between audit fees and derivative hedging" overviews finance professor Tharindra Ranasinghe's 'Do Auditors Charge a Risk Premium?' paper.

Humanity Today – Sept. 11 – Associate Clinical Professor of Finance Elinda Kiss recounts experiencing the terrorist attacks of 9/11 as a WTC survivor… Related Spanish-language video of 9/11 anniversary coverage features Kiss.

Aspen Institute – Sept. 11 – Management professor Evan Starr participates in "How Court Decisions Are Shaping Americans' Work Lives" (video) panel discussion.

WalletHub – Sept. 10 – Clinical Professor of Management Oliver Schlake gives consumer advice on balance transfer credit cards (scroll down).

ValueWalk – Sept. 9 – Finance professor Albert "Pete" Kyle overviews disruption from Robinhood and its commission-free trading app in "Robin Hood-Led Disruption in Context." Republished by Bitcoin Warrior, TechTalk, HEDGE accordingly, others.

Bloomberg – Sept. 7 - Center for Financial Policy Academic Fellow Phillip Swagel comments for "Here's How Trump Can Formally Call China a Currency Manipulator": "The U.S. has a lot of issues with China, and this is another way for the administration to say: We're not happy with the way things are going…It's more of a symbolic finding. It could support action down the road."

Washington Post – Sept. 6 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for "Stocks may dip, but experts don't see crash if Trump is impeached": "If the Trump presidency should be at risk, the market will initially drop because of uncertainty…But current policies such as the corporate tax reform and deregulation will remain in place. Monetary policy would be unaffected. Corporate profits will continue to grow at their current pace. Confidence would return to the markets."

D.C. Velocity – Sept. 6 - Logistics professor Phil Evers comments for "Amazon orders 20,000 Mercedes-Benz vans for parcel delivery program": "[Amazon] has telegraphed this for a while now, and it's a logical step…If you think of the universe of logistics, they're filling in the holes. They already have planes and they have a large-truck fleet, and now they're filling in the gaps."

Axios – Sept. 4 – "Generate" column references and links to the Washington Post's "Five Myths about Tesla," by management professors David Kirsch and Brent Goldfarb.

August 2018

Washington Post – Aug. 31 – Management and entrepreneurship professors David Kirsch and Brent Goldfarb co-author Five Myths about Tesla.

Harvard Business Review – Aug. 30 – Anil K. Gupta, Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship, co-authors "The dangers of digital protectionism."

CNBC – Aug. 30 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass contributes to "Warren Buffett on the best birthday present a billionaire can ever get: Luck."

GARP-CRO Outlook – Aug. 30 – Professor of the Practice Cliff Rossi writes "Reflections on the financial crisis: Markets and regulation factors."

Washington Business Journal – Aug. 30 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes "Elon Musk failed to meet the three principles of investing." Previous Aberman-WBJ columns: 'Surveyed D.C. entrepreneurs express tepid optimism' (Aug. 23), 'How regions [like Silicon Valley] get branded' (Aug. 16), 'Road map for building startups from innovation' (Aug. 9) 'Conventional startup as disruptor viewpoint is no longer sufficient' (Aug. 2).

SmartBrief – Aug. 30 – Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan writes "What blockchain technology can do for online advertising."

WAMU – Aug. 29 – Marketing professor Rosellina Ferraro comments for "The hidden genius of GM's office cell phone ban"… Previous Smith expert-WAMU posts: "Winning the back-to-school shopping game" (Jie Zhang, Aug. 22), "Pitching novel ideas to the boss" (Kathryn Bartol, Aug. 15), "How to survive the open floor plan office" (Nicole Coomber, Aug. 8), "Why you shouldn't ghost that job interview" (Rachel Loock, Aug. 1).

ValueWalk – Aug. 27 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs 'Berkshire Hathaway to acquire stake in Paytm'… Previous Kass-ValueWalk posts: 'Big changes to Berkshire's portfolio' (Aug. 14), 'Buffett no longer meeting with students' (Aug. 14), 'Largest companies by market capitalization' (Aug. 10).

HR Daily Advisor - Aug. 23 – Management professor Rellie Derfler-Rozin's research is a source for "The challenge with internal candidate referrals"… Related coverage via Human Resources Online's "Why referral-based hiring questions employers' moral compasses."

ETF.com – Aug. 22 – Finance professor Russ Wermers' research into stock picking for mutual funds is cited in "Skill exists, but not enough."

World Economic Forum – Aug. 22 – Professor of the Practice in Systems Thinking and Design Gerald Suarez comments in "People in these countries get the most paid vacation days": Fear is an important part of the problem, says J. Gerald Suarez…In addition to the problem of falling behind in their workload, employees are frightened that someone will cover their absence and outperform them.

Legal Theory Blog – Aug. 21 – "Anenson on unclean hands" introduces Professor of Business Law Leigh Anenson's book "Introduction to Judging Equity: The Fusion of Unclean Hands in U.S. Law."

Industry Week – Aug. 16 – Brent Goldfarb and David Kirsch co-author "Is Elon Musk taking Tesla into a dead end?"

CTV (Prince George's County) - Aug. 16 – Senior Associate Dean for Research Ritu Agarwal comments for an "Amazon healthcare overhaul" segment.

Reuters - Aug. 15 – Management and entrepreneurship professor Brent Goldfarb comments for "Uber narrows loss but is a long way from finding profit": Net revenue rose more quickly than gross bookings in the second quarter from the prior period as the company dialed back on promotional subsidies of rides. "I remain unimpressed," said Brent Goldfarb…Improving losses by cutting "the lowest hanging fruit doesn't mean the underlying model is profitable."

CNBC - Aug. 14 – Accounting and information assurance professor Nick Seybert comments for "Amazon-now-owns 1 billion worth of other companies": Amazon disclosed in its annual report that it often obtains equity warrants "as part of entering into commercial agreements," suggesting part of its compensation comes through the right to purchase shares of stock in its partner companies, according to Nick Seybert…"It makes sense to assume that Amazon is requesting these stock warrants from their commercial partners so they can take a stake in those companies' future growth."

CNN Money - Aug. 13 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd comments for "Drones and Bluetooth sneakers: What's with all the pizza gimmicks?": They may be thinking "the pizzas taste about the same, the quality's about the same, but if I can get it to you quicker... I can win out," [said Boyd].

Federal News Radio – Aug. 13 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman leads a discussion on pitfalls by politicians in developing regulations in a Unclear regulations are holding back startups segment… Previous Aberman-hosted segments are in the What's Working in Washington archives.

Sirius XM Radio-Knowledge @ Wharton – Aug. 13 – Management and entrepreneurship professor David Kirsch discusses 'Tesla going private.'

Science Magazine – Aug. 8 – PhD student Tom Taiyi Yan is co-author of a study profiled in "Men are still more likely than women to be perceived as leaders."

Forbes India – Aug. 6 – "Can mutual fund competition drive returns?"features research by finance professor Nagpurnanand Prabhala.

Washington Post – Aug. 2 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for 'Apple is the first $1 trillion company': "Apple's $1 trillion cap is equal to about 5 percent of the total gross domestic product of the United States in 2018," said David Kass..."That puts this company in perspective."

Morning Consult - Aug. 1 - Clinical Professor of Supply Chain Management and International Business Gary Cohen writes "Trump's Base of Workers, Consumers Are Losing in His Global Trade War."

July 2018

Bloomberg – July 31 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments on 'Berkshire backs Sears property spinoff': "I think [Warren Buffett is] expressing confidence in their future profitability and growth…Seritage gets 'the Warren Buffett seal of approval.'"

Federal News Radio – July 30 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman discusses "What D.C. is still lacking for entrepreneurship to thrive" with Washington Business Journal money reporter Andy Medici … Access Aberman-hosted podcasts via What's Working in Washington.

ValueWalk – July 27 – Entrepreneurship professor David Kirsch describes factors in Facebook's stock market plunge in "Facebook squeezed by market pressure from two directions" … Also posted by The Investors Podcast.

Washington Business Journal – July 26 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman gives 'Three career lessons' … Previous Aberman-WBJ columns: 'DC region needs workers with tech-and-soft skills' (July 19); 'Trump's tariffs will backfire' (July 12); 'Creativity is not a bolt from the blue' (July 5).

CNN Money – July 26 – Entrepreneurship professor David Kirsch comments in regard to 'Elon Musk's hype machine': "Given how much he talks about how busy he is, and [Tesla is undergoing] production hell — and he's been pulling out a sleeping bag on the factory floor — it raises some question about how thin-skinned he is that he'd need or choose to take time to silence one measly critic on a stock blog."

WAMU – July 25 – Career and leadership coach Rachel Loock addresses 'the most important question interviewers ask' … Previous WAMU-Smith expert pieces: Vijaya Venkataramani: 'Your unfair boss might just be overworked' (July 18); Nicole Coomber: 'How to take a better vacation' (July 11); Hui Liao: 'Channeling the Chinese power Of Moqi at work' (July 3).

MarketWatch – July 25 – Research by finance professors Alberto Rossi and Francesco D'Acunto into how peer pressure affects spending and saving is referenced in 'Are you spending more than your peers?'

Forbes – July 24 – 'Can education technology help to better engage business school students?' features marketing professor Yogesh Joshi's application of interactive dashboards to spur student debate and deeper dives into case studies.

Louisville Courier Journal – July 22 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd gives crisis management insights in 'Papa John's faces uphill climb: "[Boyd] said Papa John's should hire black store managers and executives "and let the public know about it." He noted that the only minority on Papa John's board is a Hispanic woman."

ValueWalk – July 19 – Professor of the Practice Cliff Rossi describes the downside and risk from 'Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in federal government conservatorship.'

DrivingSales – July 19 – Management professor Rellie Derfler-Rozin's research feeds into 'Internal referrals could be hurting your new hires.'

ValueWalk – July 18 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs 'Berkshire Hathaway eases standard for stock buybacks.'

SiriusXM Business Radio/Knowledge@Wharton – July 17 –Management professor Evan Starr contributes to 'How fair — or legal — are non-poaching agreements?'segment … Related: VICE features Starr's research to explain 'Non-compete agreements keep your salary low' (July 16).

CNBC – July 11 – Smith Executive Education affiliate professor Michele Gelfand writes that 'Business competitiveness between U.S. states may point to culture.'

Washington Business Journal – July 11 – Michael Dingman Chair in Strategy, Globalization and Entrepreneurship Anil K. Gupta comments in 'Greater Washington punches below its weight on IPOs': "The types of startups and businesses launched in the D.C. area, such as those that serve government clients, are also often harder to grow quickly…The rate at which you scale plays a significant role in likelihood of an IPO."

Baltimore Sun – July 9 – Senior Associate Dean Ritu Agarwal comments regarding 'Trump Administration cutting healthcare risk adjustment payments': "So much uncertainty put in the market at this point of time is very unnerving."

HR West Magazine – July 9 – Management professor Cynthia Kay Stevens writes 'Why Snooping in Applicants' Social Media Profiles is Risky' (pages 6-7).

Marketplace Radio – July 5 – Management professor Evan Starr comments in 'For American workers, noncompete agreements are pervasive': "They are found where you'd expect them to be found. In high-skill, high-wage occupations like executives and high-tech…But noncompetes are in place in many places you wouldn't expect. Minimum wage workers. Volunteers...A recent study of hair salons finds that about a third of hair stylists are bound be noncompete agreements."

BusinessBecause – July 4 – Assistant Dean of Admissions Cliff McCormick gives insight to the Smith School's role in 'The STEM-designation trend in business master's programs.'

WTOP Radio – July 2 – Career and leadership coach Rachel Loock discusses 'Best and worst email signoffs.'

Quartz – July 1 – Entrepreneurship professor David Kirsch contributes to 'Early-1900s EVs were marketed to women': "Electric-car makers had bet on a transportation model of leasing out their vehicles rather than selling them to individual buyers, not unlike what we see Uber, Lyft, and Waymo attempting to do today. But that doomed EVs when Americans adopted a culture of personal car ownership."

Louisville Courier Journal – July 1 – Clinical Professor Gary Cohen writes op-ed describing the toll of Trump Administration tariffs on U.S. newspapers … Related: Nashville Tennessean draws 'Stop job-killing tax on newspapers' editorial from Cohen's piece.

June 2018

Washington Business Journal – June 28 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes "Want to grow your organization? Hire an entrepreneur" … Previous Aberman-WBJ columns: 'The art of regulatory hacking' (June 21), 'Governance lessons from the Italian Renaissance' (June 14), 'Noncitizens' huge role in local economy' (June 7), 'Artificial intelligence a killer of jobs' (May 31), 'New approach to innovation' (May 24).

Quartz – June 28 – Research by management and organization professors Serguey Braguinsky and Rajshree Agarwal feeds into 'Japan had a war for talent a century ago' … LiveMint references same study in "Gig economy's flexible hours unlikely to narrow gender pay gap" (June 30).

WAMU – June 27 – Executive communication coach Tricia Homer describes how to "How to Fix Your Boring PowerPoint Presentations" … Previous WAMU-Smith expert posts: 'A revolution in plastics and packaging' – Kim Robertella Glinka (June 20), 'Best and worst email sign-offs' – Rachel Loock and Trevor Foulk (June 13), 'Summertime workplace attire tips' – Rachel Loock (June 6), 'Summer reading picks for leaders' – multiple contributors (May 30), 'Meetings survival guide' – Rachel Loock (May 23).

Washington Post – June 26 – Management and organization professor Trevor Foulk's research into workplace incivility informs 'When we fight fire with fire: Rudeness can be as contagious' – in response to Trump officials in public confrontations … Care2 references same research in 'Is rudeness contagious?' (June 28).

Caribbean News Now – June 26 – Kislaya Prasad, research professor and academic director of the Center for Global Business, explains Cuba tripling its main cruise terminal.

ThinkAdvisor – June 25 – Finance professor and Center for Financial Policy Director Russ Wermers' research into the causes and consequences of style drift by fund managers feeds into "Think outside the style boxes."

Knowledge@Wharton and SiriusXM Business Radio – June 25 – Marketing professor Hank Boyd discusses "IHOP to IHOB: Will the New Marketing Strategy Work?"

Barron's – June 23 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass writes, in Letters to Barron's, an answer to "Why is Berkshire's cash better than anyone else's?" … ValueWalk publishes Kass guest blogs: Kraft Heinz's interest in acquiring Campbell Soup (June 28) and 'Notes from Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting' (June 21).

Poets & Quants – June 23 – Smith MBA graduate Erin Moore endorses case competitions in "Reform Business School? The Class of 2018 Has Some Ideas"

Poets & Quants – June 20 – Andrew Malcolm and Chintan Fafadia are profiled as among the class of 2018's Best and Brightest EMBAs.

Thrive Global – June 19 – Laurie Cameron, EMBA mindful leadership instructor, discusses why 'Your mind is trainable.'

BusinessBecause – June 18 – "MBA Vs Masters: Which Should You Choose?" highlights Smith's specialized masters programs, including: Smith's STEM-designated Master of Science in Business Analytics covers hot topics like cyber security and social media and web analytics, and offers real-world learning experiences based on partnerships with companies like Deloitte, KPMG, and Unilever. Students dive into the technical—going beyond what would be covered on a traditional MBA—learning programming languages like Python and SQL.

US News & World Report (via Yahoo Finance) – June 18 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass is quoted extensively in "Pros and Cons of Buying Berkshire Hathaway Stock,' including: "[Berkshire's intrinsic value is likely at least 10 percent above its current share price. Therefore, it's undervalued and should be outperforming the market over the near future."

LSE Business Review – June 18 – Management and organization professor Rellie Derfler-Rozin co-authors "The ethical downside of hiring based on internal referrals" … QRIUS covers same research in 'Ethical downside of internal referrals' (June 18).

Financial Times – June 17 – "Business schools target women in finance" highlights related Smith initiatives: …This is a three-pronged approach, including talks at secondary schools and universities; and staging recruitment events for female professionals hosted by students, alumni and faculty staff. The school has also introduced new classes, such as one called "Ladies First" for female entrepreneurs and also "Get Confident", which encourages female MBA students to try new activities such as golf and clay pigeon shooting.

Modern Restaurant Management – June 15 – Marketing professors Jie Zhang, Mary Harms and Hank Boyd weigh in on 'IHOP to IHOb as a marketing ploy' (scroll down) … Maryland Daily Record adapts same commentary to "UMD professors pan IHOP name change."

Washington Post – June 15 – Assistant dean and executive director of career services Patricia Reich contributes to "How to use recruiters in your next job search": That first conversation with a recruiter — either for a particular opening or to add you to their "inventory" for the future — is crucial. Expect them to ask about the obvious: your skills and career goals, current job duties, notable projects or accomplishments, challenges you've overcome in past jobs, and why (and when) you're looking to make a job change. You need to equip them to essentially market you.

Business.com – June 15 – Marketing professor P.K. Kannan writes '5 Trends in Online Purchasing Habits.'

Wall Street Journal – June 11 – Marketing professor Rebecca Ratner's Journal of Consumer Research study into solo consumerism is cited in "Seeing 'Solo' Solo: Brave Movie Lovers Hit Theaters Alone."

Seeking Alpha – June 11 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass writes 'U.S. equities rise likely to continue.'

New York Times – June 7 – Management and organization professor Evan Starr's research is cited in an op-ed, "The Class Struggle According to Donald Trump": "[Evan Starr's] Noncompetes in the U.S. Labor Force found that nearly 1 in 5 labor force participants were bound by noncompetes in 2014, and nearly 40 percent had signed at least one noncompete in the past."

Forbes – June 6 – 'You'll be surprised by these online MBA grads' highlights Poets & Quants' class of 2018 'Best and Brightest online MBAs' including profiles of Smith's Jason Young and Zaneta Purvis.

Harvard Business Review – June 4 – Management and organization professor Vijaya Venkataramani co-writes "When Managers Are Overworked, They Treat Employees Less Fairly."

Morning Consult – June 4 – Information systems professor Hank Lucas writes op-ed: "Concerned About National Security? Fund Our Schools Better."

LSE Business Review – June 1 – Management and organization professor Trevor Foulk writes "Being the boss is not always good: power taints how we interact with others."

May 2018

Vox – May 30 – Management and organization professors David Kirsch and Brent Goldfarb co-author "Why is Elon Musk raging at "big media"? Because he's finally being called on his tall tales."

Poets & Quants – May 30 – Clinical professor of management Neta Moye is endorsed by Smith MBA grad Erin Moore as among 'Favorite Professors of Best and Brightest MBAs': Neta is always willing to have conversations with students about their specific career goals and how to use their soft skills to influence change.

CGTN – May 28 – Management and organization professor Anil K. Gupta joins a panel of experts to discuss "China's 40 years of Reform."

WERA Radio (Arlington) May 28 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman joins 'Is Amazon coming to Arlington?' discussion.

The Street – May 27 – Marketing professor Jie Zhang comments for "'Worn Out' Shoemakers Still Have a Chance to Heal": "Store-based footwear retailers are having a particularly difficult time, as more consumers are switching their purchases from online stores and discount retailers," Zhang said. She explained that online platforms, such as Amazon, and big-box stores, like TJ Maxx, are able to offer a broad assortment at lower prices than traditional shoe sellers.

New York Times – May 25 – Marketing professor Wendy Moe's research into online display advertising is drawn into 'What advertising history says about fake news.'

ValueWalk – May 22 – Marketing professor Jie Zhang explains why 'Saks Fifth Avenue's makeover positions the luxury retailer to differentiate and better compete.'

HBR Ascend – May 22 – Research by management and organization professor Myeong-Gu Seo informs "How emotions fuel good decisions."

NBC News (online) – May 22 – Management and organization professor Trevor Foulk contributes to "Why rudeness is so toxic — and how to stop it": "Most interactions are ambiguous in terms of meaning…We know what we mean, but we're relying on the target to infer the meaning we want."

Phys.org – May 18 – Research by management and organization professor Trevor Foulk is summarized in "Why teams perform better with divergent perspectives."

Business Insider – May 18 – Professor emeritus Edwin Locke's research into goal-setting feeds 'What to do when bored at work.'

American Banker – May 17 – Professor of the Practice Cliff Rossi comments for "Wells Fargo's latest snafu renews a question: Can an insider fix the bank?": "Unfortunately for Wells Fargo, it's emerging that these process weaknesses are in various places...Something is not quite right there."

Economist - May 17 – Management professor Evan Starr and his research is cited in "Lawmakers are trying to curb contracts that make it harder to change jobs": Non-competes might not be harmful for workers, on balance, if employers had to pay extra to compensate employees for signing away some of their rights. But an analysis by Evan Starr of the University of Maryland suggests this is not what happens…

Washington Business Journal – May 17 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman critiques a recent Washingtonian essay suggesting to redistribute government workers across the country to better "empathize with Americans." Previous Aberman-WBJ columns: 'New Maryland cyber tax credits' (May 10), How cybersecurity fosters economic growth (May 3).

WAMU – May 16 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi gives a 'Housing market report card (10 years after the financial crisis).' Previous Smith Brain Trust commentaries at WAMU: 'Why we should stop covering our true identities [in the workplace]' – Nicole Coomber (May 9); 'Financial literacy for new high school grads' – Smith MBA grad Jon Chapman (May 4); 'You might be in a career rut if…' – Gerald Suarez (May 2); 'What will Buffett do with Berkshire's cash' – David Kass (April 25); 'Five techniques for better email/workplace communication' – Rachel Loock (April 18); 'Mentoring in a #MeToo era' – Neta Moye (April 11).

ValueWalk - May 15 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass reports on Berkshire Hathaway increasing its Teva and Monsanto holdings.

Federal News Radio – May 14 - Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman's and Matt Scassero, Director of UMD's Unmanned Aircraft Systems Test Site, discuss drone policy and technology. Previous Aberman-hosted What's Working D.C. podcasts/topics: 'Boosting Maryland's cybersecurity industry' (May 9); 'The changing face of real estate' (May 4).

Virginian Pilot - May 14 – Adjunct professor and Dingman Center Board of Advisors Chair Liz Sara writes "Getting big firms to incubate your startup."

Poets & Quants - May 10 – Center for Global Business Executive Director Rebecca Bellinger and Smith student Victoria Tataw give insight into "Benefits of study abroad."

Salon – May 10 – Management professor Trevor Foulk writes 'In hospitals a little rudeness can be a big deal' (reprised from then-doctoral student Foulk's 2015 post at The Conversation).

Forbes - May 9 – Finance professors Francesco D'Acunto and Alberto Rossi comment on their study into a new platform to benchmark personal finance, via "How peer pressure could help boost your savings."

ValueWalk – May 7 - Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass's 'Notes from the Berkshire Hathaway annual shareholder meeting' are featured. Related: Kass, via Sina (China), previews the meeting; My Money Blog posts archived links to previous-years' Kass-Berkshire meeting notes; and Valuewalk posts a Kass-contributed chapter to "The Warren Buffett Shareholder" book.

GARP CRO Outlook – May 4 – Professor of the Practice Cliff Rossi writes about 'Biases and a need for better risk training' in reflecting on the 2008 financial crisis.

The Diamondback – May 2 – From "UMD students develop app to incentivize recycling": A lot of [students] come up and they're like, 'I have no idea what to do whenever I go up to recycle,'" said Jason Malkofsky-Berger, a marketing and operations management and business analytics major. "They really like that our system told them exactly what to do, and then, of course, they like being rewarded for it as well."

Kiplinger's – May 2018 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass is quoted in "What Would Warren [Buffett] Do" (paywall for digital copy): "Still, at its current price, Teva would not be the bargain for you that it was for Buffett. Teva's average price was roughly $14.50 a share during the fourth quarter, says David Kass, University of Maryland finance professor and longtime Buffett watcher. If you bought now, you'd pay more than 30% more than Buffett did."

April 2018

Forbes - April 25 – Anil K. Gupta, Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy and Entrepreneurship, is cited in "A growing number of Indian-Americans are leading America's best business schools: "The ideas of Indian business and management gurus [like Smith School professor Anil K. Gupta] have become part of mainstream Western business thinking."

Washington Post – April 23 – "What does the yield on the 10-year treasury mean to you?" quotes Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass: "The 10-year is potential competition for stocks…The 10-year is very visible…Financial markets tend to focus on the 10-year rate as a form of long-term interest rates."

Forbes - April 20 - Rajshree Agarwal, professor and director of the Ed Snider Center for Enterprise and Markets, writes"Users, Own Your Role In Facebook's Scandal."

Wall Street Journal - April 20 – Finance professor Russ Wermers' research is cited in "Do Index Funds Cost 100 Times As Much As You Think?"

Sirius XM Business Radio/Knowledge@Wharton – April 20 - Clinical professor of marketing Hank Boyd discusses "What Brands Can Learn from Starbucks' Crisis Response."

Portafolio (Colombia) – April 18 – Analysis of the Fed's move to substitute the Libor Rate with the Secured Overnight Financing Rate references recent commentary by Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi: Although no government institution regulated and monitored it, it went from being a reference for a local market (London) to being an indicator for global business, explained [Rossi].

Investing.com – April 16 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass writes about 'Stock buybacks as a strategic advantage.'

The Hill – April 14 – Marketing professor P.K. Kannan writes "For better or worse, your devices (and marketers) track your comings and goings."

eHealth News - April 13 – A study led by the Center for Health Information and Decision Systems is profiled, via "Study Determines How Personality Affects mHealth Self-management."

Morning Consult – April 13 – Accounting lecturer Sam Handwerger writes "What U.S. Colleges and Their Foreign Students Should Know About IRS Form 8843."

Competitive Enterprise Blog - April 13 - Rajshree Agarwal, professor and director of the Ed Snider Center for Enterprise and Markets discusses her career and business philosophy in a 'True value of free enterprise" interview in multiple segments.

Technology Networks - April 11 – A recent study by operations management professor Sean Barnes is profiled via "New tools for combating antibiotic resistance."

HBR Ascend (Harvard Business Review newsletter) – April 11 – Management professor Rellie Derfler-Rozin co-writes "Does Doing the Same Work Over and Over Again Make You Less Ethical?"

Baltimore Sun Marketplace - April 2018 – Senior Associate Dean for Research Ritu Agarwal discusses the demand for Smith's forthcoming healthcare certificate program, via "Constantly evolving for lifelong learning (page 4)": "No sector is more affected than health care…It's the perfect storm of disruption – changes in regulations, changes in technology and changes in customer expectation. These are three triggers for disruption, and in this case, all three are active at the same time."

Advisor Magazine – April 8 – Accounting lecturer Samuel Handwerger explains how retroactive IRA payments can reduce tax bills: "Strategies for tax planning."

Reuters – April 5 – Management professor Evan Starr and his research into noncompete agreements is referenced supporting a commentary, "Monopsony money," warning about markets where a single buyer is dominant: …Such non-compete agreements are standard at many companies, from retail giant Amazon to sandwich franchise Jimmy John's. Thorough studies by Evan Starr of the University of Maryland show that these restrictions do indeed tend to keep wages down.

WAMU - April 4 – Finance professor Albert "Pete" Kyle explains 'What rising interest rates mean for you.'

Harvard Law School Forum - April 1 – Accounting professor Musa Subasi guest blogs about his research co-authored with Smith colleague Rebecca Hann: "Do Director Networks Improve Managerial Learning from Stock Prices?

March 2018

Slate – March 30 – Management and entrepreneurship professor Brent Goldfarb comments for "Is Uber Really Charging Frequent Users Higher Fares?": "If you've got a high-value user and you can get them to pay more money, that's good for your business," said Brent Goldfarb, an associate professor of at the University of Maryland. "But the risk is the reputation concerns. Uber is already having a lot of difficulty anyway with that."

Brookings TechTank – March 29 - Ritu Agarwal and Gordon Gao's research are referenced supporting an analysis: "When choosing a doctor, patients prefer online reviews to government ratings."

GARP CRO Outlook – March 29 – Professor of the Practice Cliff Rossi writes column, "Regulatory Changes May Ease Banks' Prudential Risk Management Practices – But They Shouldn't"

Science Daily – March 29 – Research led by a team at Smith's Center for Health Information and Decision Systems shows "How personality affects gamified diabetes self-management."

ValueWalk – March 29 – Marketing professor Roland Rust comments extensively in "Volvo's reputation risk from Uber setback" (republished by RoboDriver, others)

WAMU - March 28 – Marketing professor Rebecca Ratner's research reveals "The Chat That Will Improve Your Social Life."

Seeking Alpha – March 27 – Adjunct finance professor Ryan Guttridge and Master of Quantitative Finance student Adam Greene co-author guest piece: "Apple Phones Are Not The Most Expensive - Multiple Expansion Warranted."

Mother Nature Network – March 26 – Management professor Trevor Foulk's research is featured in a commentary: 'Rudeness can ruin your day — even if it isn't aimed at you.'

Washington Post – March 26 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for "Why Uber is selling its Southeast Asia business to a local rival": "Uber is looking ahead to their expected IPO in 2019, and they need to shore up their balance sheet and income statement," he said. "They are focusing on where they believe they are more likely to succeed, both in terms of profits and in terms of sales growth.

Virginian Pilot - March 23 – Adjunct professor and Dingman Board Chair Liz Sara writes guest column: "Angel groups are the latest boom in investing."

Forbes India – March 23 – A paper, 'Experimental Evidence on Complementarities Between Human Capital and Machine Learning,' co-authored by Smith management professors Evan Starr and Rajshree Agarwal is referenced in "Why artificial intelligence isn't a sure thing to increase productivity": The paper, written with Evan Starr and Rajshree Agarwal of the University of Maryland, suggests that firms must think carefully about the skills they'll need to hire for or train for in employees if they are going to get the most bang for the buck from their new AI.

The Hill – March 22 – Finance professor Vojislav Maksimovic co-writes op-ed: "America giving up on entrepreneurship?" … Related commentary by Maksimovic at VoxEU: "The decline in quality of manufacturing entrepreneurship in the US " (republished by Naked Capitalism)

Variety – March 21 – Marketing professor P.K. Kannan gives insights on Apple-product placement in "Apple Polishing: iPhone Giant Can't Keep Mum About Behind-the-Scenes TV Role": They need to sell their increasingly more expensive smartphones to keep their revenues flowing in...Producers and marketers of hardware have a tough problem when they release new models – convincing the customers of their older models to upgrade to the new versions." … Further reported, with Kannan's comments, in Mac Rumors' "New Report Looks Into Apple's Growing Promotional Presence Within Popular TV Shows."

WAMU - March 21 – Professors David Kass (finance) and Sean Barnes (operations management) give insights on the state of Major League Baseball in "Is America's Pastime Dying?"

Bloomberg - March 21 – Associate Dean for Masters Programs Michael Faulkender is nominated for Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy.

Washington Post – March 19 – Adjunct entrepreneurship professor Jonathan Aberman writes column: "Online networking: If I don't know you, why should I respond to your request?"

ValueWalk – March 16 – Professor of the Practice Clifford Rossi comments extensively in "Credit-Reporting Agency Scrutiny Inadequate In Dodd-Frank Rollback."

Baltimore Style – March 16 – Marketing professor Jie Zhang comments for "Super Stores" – a grocery-retail trends overview.

March 14 – Management professors Oliver Schlake and Trevor Foulk give ways organizations can capitalize on NCAA basketball tournament popularity in "Embrace The Madness To Build Workplace Culture."

The Hill – March 13 – Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship and director of the Ed Snider Center for Enterprise and Markets, writes op-ed: "America is divided over heavy-metal cronyism."

The Hill – March 13 – Clinical Professor of International Business Gary Cohen writes op-ed: "If this Trump's NAFTA negotiating ploy, it's not great."

Washington Post – March 12 - Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes: "The politically woke consumer just might be what our democracy needs."Read … Preceding Aberman-Capital Business columns: 'Tariffs and retaliatory tariffs hinder fast tech waves, economic growth' (March 5); 'Growing the economy in the future' (Feb. 26); 'Open letter to Amazon (Feb. 19); 'Get behind the Metro coalition' (Feb. 12)

Guyana Chronicle – March 10 – "Finding Common Cause" editorial cites management professor Subra Tangirala's 'Men's Voice and Participation in Gender-Parity Initiatives' research: "[Tangirala] revealed that men often refrain from participating in or speaking up about gender parity initiatives because they experience lowered levels of psychological standing than women — that is, they feel that it is not their place to engage with those initiatives. This explanation held even when other possible explanations, such as possible prejudicial attitude or sexism on the part of men, were taken into account." Read

Technical.ly DC – March 9 – Dingman Center Executive Director Elana Fine on the Pitch Dingman competition: "Over the past few years, we've been really very lucky to have several donors who've been involved in the competition. That's given us the ability to raise the stakes a little bit." Read … Related: Maryland Daily Record recaps the March 6, 2018, Pitch Dingman competition won by Symbiont Health.

EmaxHealth – March 8 – 'Why Should Hospitals Reduce Unnecessary Antibiotic Use' report quotes operations management professor Sean Barnes and cites his related research: "But what is really troubling is that nearly half of all antibiotics prescribed may be inappropriate. Even moderate reductions in antibiotic use can reduce transmission of MDROs." Read

American Banker - March 6 – Professor of the Practice Cliff Rossi on Gary Cohn's resignation as a White House economic advisor: "Gary Cohn was very well respected for pushing through the tax cuts, but obviously Cohn's view on tariffs differs. The tariffs are unpopular among bankers, too, who fear they will provoke an international trade war. There was some unhappiness between them for some time and the tariffs were enough of a reason for him to move on." Read

JoongAng Ilbo (South Korea) – March 5 - Gary Cohen, clinical professor of international business and supply chain management, comments extensively on a General Motors plant closure in Gunsan, South Korea. Read

ValueWalk – March 5 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs an overview of a recent CNBC-Warren Buffett interview, including discussion of the annual Letter to Shareholders. Read

Investor's Business Daily – March 2 – Gary Cohen, clinical professor of international business and supply chain management, writes op-ed: 'Economy-consumers on losing end of aluminum-steel tariffs.' Read … Related: Baltimore Sun's 'Baltimore area businesses brace for tariffs' quotes Cohen's op-ed; Cohen comments on the issue (March 10) to NOS (Dutch Public Broadcasting)

CGTN - March 2 – Anil K. Gupta, Michael D. Dingman Chair in Strategy, Globalization and Entrepreneurship, discusses possible global effects of U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum. Watch

Sirius XM-Knowledge@Wharton – March 1 – Clinical Professor of Marketing Hank Boyd discusses the box office success and social significance of The Black Panther. Read/Listen … Related: Boyd comments throughout Chief Marketer's "Wakanda Forever: Black Panther's Lessons for Marketers" (March 1) and writes op-ed, 'Black Panther isn't just a great movie…' via Marketing Daily (Feb. 23)

February 2018

RetailWire – Feb. 28 – Marketing research into social tag metrics by professors P.K. Kannan and Yogesh Joshi is reviewed and discussed by industry experts. Read … Related coverage via Phys.org, others

Minnesota Public Radio – Feb. 28 – Management and entrepreneurship professor Brent Goldfarb comments on Uber's market situation. Read/listen

BNN (Canada) - Feb. 26 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass discusses Warren Buffett's annual letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders. Watch … Kass guest blogs on the same topic, via Investing.com (also at ValueWalk)

MIT Sloan Management Review – Feb. 23 – Information systems professors Peng Huang and Sunil Mithas co-write overview of their recent research, into "knowledge seeding" that yields lessons for firms developing virtual communities. Read

Wall Street Journal - Feb. 23 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass comments for "Playing With $100 Billion, Warren Buffett Is Giant Trader of U.S. Treasury Bills" report: "He's aware that [Berkshire's cash] is not earning a high rate of return for shareholders. Paying out a special cash dividend, a one-time dividend at the discretion of management, makes some sense." Read … Related: Kass is quoted on 'Why Buffett is dumping Walmart stock,' via Kiplinger (Feb. 21)

GARP's CRO (Chief Risk Officer) Outlook – Feb. 23 – Professor of the Practice Cliff Rossi writes "How to Reduce Model Risk: 4 Basic Principles." Read

Nasdaq Newsletter – Feb. 20 – A 2002 behavioral finance study by professor Russ Wermers is cited: "[Wermers] found that constraining managers to boxes defined by price/earnings ratio and market capitalization costs about 300 basis points a year in performance. In other words, a manager pursuing a rigid investment strategy should not refrain from purchasing his or her best ideas when those best ideas do not fit in one style." Read

Keller Center for Business Research News – Feb. 19 – Marketing professor Amna Kirmani writes guest column overviewing her "Doing Well vs. Doing Good: The Differential Effect of Underdog Positioning on Moral and Competent Service Providers" research. Read

ValueWalk – Feb. 14 – Accounting professor Rebecca Hann explains the recent Dow plunge in the face of 'good economic news.' Read

Pension Pulse – Feb. 14 – Finance professor and Associate Dean for Masters Programs Mike Faulkender's 2009 Maryland Public Television interview covering CEO compensation is highlighted and linked to.

Bloomberg – Feb. 13 – Management professor Evan Starr on the IBM lawsuit to block its chief diversity officer's move to Microsoft: "Non-competition clauses are common in the technology industry, covering most employees…Many companies, especially in the tech industry, they have these contracts that are signed by almost everybody. It's a blanket thing that everybody is kind of bound by." Read

Omaha World Herald – Feb. 12 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass is cited as a contributor to a forthcoming book, "The Warren Buffett Shareholder." Read … Related: Kass guest blogs at ValueWalk about 'Major changes to the Berkshire portfolio' (Feb. 14)

Washington Post - Feb 8 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass on implications of the early February stock market plunge: "There is a lot of concern in the rising yield in the 10-year Treasury note…As it approaches 3 percent, concerns about inflation and competition for stocks by fixed income securities are increasing." Read … Republished by the Boston Globe, others

New York Times – Feb. 8 – Marketing professor Jie Zhang comments for a 'Shopping Apps Do's and Don'ts' NerdWallet-produced piece: "Through exclusive offers and built-in loyalty programs, individual retailers' shopping apps intend to lock-in shoppers. For example, the wallet feature on the J.C. Penney app lets shoppers see and redeem rewards, coupons and gift cards in one place." … Also published, via the Associated Press, by Time, U.S. News and Report, the Charlotte Observer, others

Value Walk – Feb. 7 – Professor of the Practice Cliff Rossi describes an increasing of regulators' vigilance toward bank boards as a sign from the recent Wells Fargo sanctions. Read

Frederick News Post – Feb. 5 – Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship Managing Director Elana Fine on how technology is spurring the gig economy: "For many of the jobs, technology has been the missing link. It has made some existing jobs easier but has also created new opportunities, such as managing social media for a company." Read

Washington Post – Feb. 5 - Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes column weighing the D.C. region's attractiveness to Millennials prioritizing affordable living. Read … Preceding Aberman-Capital Business columns: 'Tech-driven fakery and a post-truth society' (Jan. 29); 'Federal government shutdown implications' (Jan. 22); 'Greater Washington workforce trends' (Jan. 15); 'Federal contracting risks, opportunities' (Jan. 8)

WalletHub – Feb. 5 – Marketing professor and Center for Excellence in Service Director Janet Wagner gives insights to Valentine's Day marketing. Read

WTOP Radio – Feb. 5 – In a live segment, marketing professor Hank Boyd reviewed and analyzed the Super Bowl ads from the previous evening's game telecast.

ValueWalk – Feb. 3 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass guest blogs "Wells Fargo punished by the Fed." Read

Advisor Perspectives - Feb. 2 – Finance professor and Center for Financial Policy Director Russ Wermers' research is referenced in a 'Finding superior active managers' column. Read

Baltimore Sun – Feb. 1 – Marketing professor Hank Boyd comments on restaurant-rebranding strategy: "New concepts can generate buzz from new customers, but they can also alienate longtime clientele. Boyd said it's important for restaurants to communicate to customers the reasons behind their changes." Read

January 2018

NJ Biz – Jan. 31 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass on the Berkshire Hathaway, JPMorgan and Amazon plan to create a healthcare company: "I think there are opportunities to reduce the prices and price increases of pharmaceuticals in this country. It is quite glaring how much lower prices are for specific pharmaceuticals in other countries. There is enormous potential for cost savings…The partnership could be transformative for the wider corporate world. It will certainly be in the interest of other corporations to observe what is happening here." Read … Related: Kass-ValueWalk guest blogs: 'Berkshire healthcare disruption' and 'Highlights from Buffett on CNBC'

WYPR – Jan. 29 – Senior Associate Dean for Research Ritu Agarwal discusses the repealing of net neutrality rules. Listen

People Development Magazine – Jan. 28 – Marketing professor P.K. Kannan on Amazon's recent purchase of Whole Foods: "Amazon will be able to collect data on these customers' online and offline purchases to create a larger buying profile…[The Whole Foods deal] will be most beneficial in allowing better recommendations from Amazon, coupons for either retailer and cross promotion." Read

Auburn Seminary Voices – Jan. 27 – Executive in Residence Bill Longbrake writes, in 'An Open Letter to Larry Fink,' about Smith School initiatives exemplifying "how business schools can become powerful enabling allies" to companies in terms of serving a social purpose. Read

GARP – Jan. 25 – Professor of the Practice Cliff Rossi writes a CRO Outlook column, "Raising Board Awareness of Bank Machine-Learning Applications." Read

WJLA/Sinclair Broadcast Group – Jan. 24 – Global trade professor Gary Cohen on U.S. trade policy in the context of the World Economic Forum: "In Asia, we walked away from TPP... and by pulling out of that, these Asian countries are now forging a partnership and a trade agreement without us. I think that's going to hurt. And we still don't know what the impact will be on NAFTA, that's still up in the air." Read … Cohen gave related commentary via Sirius XM's POTUS, WBAL radio and the South China Morning Post (which excerpted Cohen's "What are the trade cards Donald Trump could play against China?" op-ed at The Hill)

Washington Post – Jan. 19 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass contributes to a piece titled 'Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway had an amazing 2017': "I would not be surprised to see both Jain and Abel joining vice chairman Charlie Munger and chairman Warren Buffett on the stage at the upcoming May 5 meeting, not only answering shareholder questions, but also eating See's Candies' peanut brittle and drinking Cokes." Read … Kass comments (Jan. 12) for Omaha World Herald's "Would potential successor move Berkshire's HQ out of Omaha?

Business Today (Kenya) - Jan. 19 – Management and entrepreneurship professor Brent Goldfarb comments on the Bitcoin bubble. Read

WalletHub – Jan. 19 – Marketing professor Amna Kirmani contributes insights into airline rewards programs. Read

CNN Money - Jan. 19 – Entrepreneurship lecturer Jonathan Aberman comments on the release of 'Amazon hq2' finalists. Read … Related: Aberman comments on Howard County's failed bid for Amazon hq2, via the Baltimore Sun (Jan. 24)

Kiplinger - Jan. 8 – Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass on index funds versus hedge funds: "In order for hedge funds to justify their '2 and 20' fee structures, their rates of return after fees must exceed what any investor can earn from a low-cost S&P 500 index fund…Their fee structures makes this extremely difficult to achieve over time." Read

The Hill - Jan. 4 - Clinical Professor of International Business, Global Trade and Supply Chain Management Gary Cohen writes op-ed, "Trade fight on washing machines will do more harm than good." Read … Cohen writes, Dec. 21, in the Morning Consult: 'In U.S. and South Korea, Business Is Not as Usual.'

Seeking Alpha - Jan. 4 - Clinical Professor of Finance David Kass, gives 'Five stocks to watch in 2018.' Read ... Also at ValueWalk

Baltimore Sun - Jan. 3 - Rajshree Agarwal, Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship and director of the Ed Snider Center for Enterprise and Markets, writes a "Make a New Year's Strategy, not a Resolution" op-ed. Read

4-Traders - Jan. 3 - Robert H. Smith Professor of Information Systems Henry Lucas is quoted regarding Laureate Education prospects in emerging markets: "A keen attention to recruiting tactics, price, quality and job placement will be key to protecting Laureates brand." Read

BizEd -Jan. 2 - Robert H. Smith Professor of Leadership and Innovation Kathryn Bartol co-writes a guest piece, "Three Behaviors for High-Performing Virtual Teams." Read

All Analytics - Jan. 2 - Dean's Chair in Marketing Science P.K. Kannan comments extensively in "What retailers know about you." Read

Washington Post - Jan. 1 - Management lecturer Jonathan Aberman writes that politics weighed heavily in key lessons learned in 2017 by Greater Washington business leaders. Read … Previous Aberman-Capital Business columns: 'A case for expanding D.C.'s tech workforce (Dec. 18); 'Tax reform implications for D.C.'s tech economy (Dec. 11); 'Why to worry about bitcoin's escalation' (Dec. 4) 'Internet access is a public benefit' (Nov. 27)

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