Do This Before You Hang Out With Friends To Have More Fun.

We know goal-setting meetings can help teams be more productive in the workplace, and, according to research from Maryland Smith’s Rebecca Ratner, they can also help you get the most out of activities in your personal life.

Overconfident Investors Are Creating Momentum. Here’s How To Capitalize On It.

Every investor is chasing the answer to one question: When should I buy stocks and when should I sell them? It’s the elusive formula for timing the market. Now new research from Maryland Smith’s Albert S. “Pete” Kyle shows how markets gain momentum and how investors can make better decisions based on it. “Investors want to buy the stock that’s going to go up, and they want to sell the stock that’s going to go down,” says Kyle, the Charles E. Smith Professor of Finance.

Here’s the Best Way To Build a Startup Team

Finding the right team is critical for a startup’s success and most aren’t taking the right approach, finds new Maryland Smith research. With the right strategy – a mix that has founders both liking each other due to shared values and experiences, and having the proper complementary skills and capabilities – startups can foster better team dynamics and have more success raising funds, being productive, and earning profits.

What Can Firms Learn From Online Consumer Engagement?

Ford set its sights on overtaking Tesla in the electric car market when it announced in May its competitive $40,000 price point for the new F-150 Lightning electric pickup. Scanning consumer sentiment and determining whether it succeeded in winning over popular opinion is typically a difficult process. But new research from Maryland Smith found a way.

Academia, a Promised Land?

Editor’s note: For women with a science or engineering PhD, is academia a more equitable haven, compared to industry? Is it a place where gender gaps narrow in pay and promotions? In recent research published in Nature Biotechnology, Maryland Smith’s Rajshree Agarwal and Waverly Ding, together with Hitotsubashi University’s Atsushi Ohyama, explored those questions. Writing for the journal’s “Behind the Paper” series, they describe their findings. Below is an excerpt of what they wrote. By Rajshree Agarwal and Waverly Ding

How Privilege and Politics Are Affecting Disparity in Vaccine Rates

Income, educational attainment and political ideology all play into racial disparities in vaccination rates that have left African Americans more vulnerable to COVID-19, Maryland Smith researchers found. In a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they write that “structural inequities pose a serious threat to progress” in the push for nationwide vaccination.  

How Pioneering Startups in the Mobile Money Industry Defied All Odds

It’s a tale as old as time – David vs Goliath. And this classic underdog story illustrates pioneers of the global mobile money industry as well, according to new research from Maryland Smith.

Can Getting Emotional At Work Increase Innovation?

Companies are always looking for ways to get teams to innovate more and find creative answers to problems. New research from Maryland Smith’s Myeong-Gu Seo finds one way to do so is to encourage employees to bare their feelings – both positive and negative – to team members.

How Our Need To Reciprocate Could Be The Key To Getting Healthy

A groundbreaking study from Maryland Smith’s Center for Health Information and Decisions Systems is the first to examine how reciprocity could be used as a motivator to influence behaviors.

Dispersed Teams Succeed Fast But Fail Slow. And That’s A Problem.

For more than a year, many of us have been working remotely as part of a dispersed team. But how efficient are those teams? New research from Maryland Smith’s David M. Waguespack finds that dispersed teams succeed faster than teams working together in the same space. But dispersed teams are slower to abandon failing projects.

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