Faculty & Research

Aug 12, 2015
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U.S. oil prices fell to a six-year low on Aug. 11, 2015, and one person not surprised would be the late Smith School economist Julian L. Simon. "There is no compelling reason to believe that world oil prices will rise in the coming decades," he wrote in 1984 when most experts predicted overpopulation and depletion of the earth's natural resources. Six of Simon's former colleagues and children share their...

Aug 07, 2015
World Class Faculty & Research
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Because of its broad holdings and massive scale, the Tata Group is sometimes called “the GE of India.” But in terms of growth, if not sheer size, Tata outsmarts its American cousin. Tata’s revenue has multiplied 10-fold since 2002, far outpacing GE. Smith School professor Sunil Mithas draws lessons from Tata's rise in his new book, "Making the Elephant Dance."...

Aug 06, 2015
World Class Faculty & Research
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Customers have kvetched about airline baggage fees since American Airlines started charging people for even one checked bag in 2008, but the practice has swept the industry. Last month, JetBlue started charging passengers for luggage, leaving Southwest standing alone as the only company to let all passengers check a bag or two without an extra charge. Although many travelers grumble about the fees, new research from Smith School...

Jul 29, 2015
World Class Faculty & Research
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Is "quarterly capitalism" a problem for the American economy? Hillary Clinton hopes to make the alleged short-term focus of corporations an issue in the 2016 presidential campaign. In a speech at New York University on Friday, she offered several proposals that would "reward farsighted investors and companies that seek to build up value." Professor Phillip L. Swagel from the Smith School's Center for Financial...

Jul 17, 2015
World Class Faculty & Research
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Do you have gender "faultlines" in your organization? New research co-authored by Smith School professor Hui Liao suggests that such fissures appear when gender differences solidify into cliques. And this tends to occur when members of one gender share other demographic traits and professional interests, such as age, job responsibilities and time served. For example, the men in one organization might be young...

Jul 15, 2015
World Class Faculty & Research
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The Chinese stock market meltdown bears more than a passing resemblance to the U.S. crash of 1929. Many observers have noted the similar scale of the two implosions: The Dow fell by 25 percent in the week of Black Thursday; from June 18 to July 3, the two main Chinese markets fell by 31 percent. But the parallels go beyond scale, according to the Smith School finance professor Albert "Pete" Kyle. From a...

Jul 13, 2015
World Class Faculty & Research
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One of the most closely scrutinized questions in finance is whether any fund managers can beat the market, year after year. The evidence is far more mixed than you might think from reading stories in the business media about investment "geniuses" of various stripes. New research from the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business adds to the evidence that some fund managers indeed can beat the market, but with a...

Jul 01, 2015
World Class Faculty & Research
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Bill Longbrake, executive-in-residence at the Smith School's Center for Financial Policy, lays out the big issues for Greece as the country enters the end game of its long-running financial drama. "There are times when, even though there might be a logical solution from an economic and financial point of view, you can't get there because of political constraints," Longbrake says....

Jun 29, 2015
World Class Faculty & Research
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John Hancock rallied a nation with his large autograph on the Declaration of Independence, but new research from the Smith School shows that signature size on corporate financial statements can signal far less noble intentions. The working paper, led by Smith accounting professor Nick Seybert and 2015 Smith PhD graduate Charles Ham, finds that chief financial officers with large signatures are...

Jun 26, 2015
Entrepreneurial Spirit
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Fitbit is riding high: When the wearable fitness device company went public last month, its stock closed the day 48 percent over its IPO price, which puts the company's value at $4.1 billion. But critics see some vulnerabilities. Smith alumna Elana Fine, managing director of the school's Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship, shares insights. ...

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