Faculty & Research

May 20, 2015
Comments Comments

Congratulations, you just got a stretch assignment! This means your boss trusts you and sees leadership potential. But beware. New research from the Smith School shows potential pitfalls. The same assignment that can inspire engagement and critical thinking also can trigger self-doubt and anxiety. Co-authors Myeong-Gu Seo and Kathryn M. Bartol say some people cope well, while others crumble...

May 13, 2015
Comments Comments

Smith Executive Programs Broadens Access to OPM-Standard Assessment

May 06, 2015
Comments Comments

People like to have choices. But research shows that human brains have limits, and making too many decisions over the course of a day can wear down a person’s self-control. Smith professor Nicole M. Coomber has created a simple framework that can help people guard against decision fatigue. She says people must consider at least four things: values, automation, rationality and intuition....

Apr 29, 2015
World Class Faculty & Research
Comments Comments
 
Congratulations to the following faculty and PhD alumni from the marketing department at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business:
 
Finalist, 2015 Marketing Science Long-Term Impact Award 
Dave Godes' paper with Dina Mayzlin  “Firm-Created Word-of-Mouth Communication: Evidence from a Field Test,” Marketing Science, Volume 28, issue 4, 2009, (July/August), pp. 721-39,  is a finalist for the Long-Term Impact Award. This paper was also a finalist for the John D. C....
Apr 29, 2015
World Class Faculty & Research
Comments Comments

Smith School Professor and Assistant Dean Rebecca Ratner talks with Huff Post Live today, Wednesday, April 29 at 4 p.m./EDT.

Many people feel embarrassed about doing fun activities alone, such as dining out or going to a movie. Ratner's research finds that when solo consumers do venture out, they enjoy themselves more than they expect. The challenge for companies that offer fun experiences is to figure out how to market to solo consumers.

Watch the show.

Apr 22, 2015
World Class Faculty & Research
Comments Comments

Say on Pay, which gives shareholders a nonbinding vote on executive compensation, leads companies to reduce excessive pay in certain circumstances. That's according to new research by Smith professor Russ Wermers and a coauthor. Previous academic studies of Say on Pay have found mixed results, with some concluding that the provision—part of the Dodd-Frank legislation and in effect since 2011—has had no effect. But...

Apr 20, 2015
Comments Comments

Economists point to the rural parts of Africa, India, China, Eastern Europe and other developing markets as the next frontier for big multinational corporations. But the challenges of selling products and services to consumers in these environments go way beyond effective marketing campaigns. And it’s more than just swapping out features to suit local tastes. New research co-authored by Smith professor Judy Frels...

Apr 15, 2015
Comments Comments

Surveys show little change in American attitudes toward gun control after mass shootings, and gun sales have been going up in recent years. But the stock market may tell a different tale. Investors appear to be skeptical of the long-term prospects of the gun industry's business model, according to new scholarship produced at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business....

Apr 15, 2015
Comments Comments

More is better than less. “It’s not complicated,” AT&T explains in its popular television ads. Similar reasoning does not apply in foreign currency exchange, where strong is better than weak — except when it isn’t. For U.S. consumers the dollar’s recent surge means cheaper imports, lower inflation and hot deals on international travel. But it also means lower demand for exports, which slows economic growth. Kristen...

Apr 01, 2015
Comments Comments

Psychology studies show that physically attractive people generally have an advantage. But new research from Smith School professor Marko Pitesa clarifies the mechanism through which attractiveness works as an advantage in one specific scenario -- job interviews. More intriguingly, the research also shows when beauty can work against you. “It’s not always an...

Pages