Logistics, Business & Public Policy

The Gradualist Approach to Rate Hikes: American Monetary Policy and Economic Recovery

The second Smith School Faculty debate for 2015 will explore the government's current approach to monetary policy. Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen has stated that interest rates soon will begin to rise as long as underlying indicators of a recovering economy such as wage growth remain stable. In light of the global economic landscape, what are likely outcomes of the Fed's approach to raising interest rates?

Please join the distinguished panel for a lively discussion!

Time: 
October 29, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm

Simon Says: Meet the Smith School Economist Who Took on the Doomsayers and Won

Time had run out in 1980. An earth capable of sustaining only a limited number of hungry consumers had been pushed too far, and “The Population Bomb” described by conservation biologist Paul Ehrlich would soon explode. Most in academia accepted the dire warnings about overpopulation and resource depletion. But the late Smith School economist Julian Simon listened to the arguments and recognized a flaw.

Five Effects of the Interest Rate Hike

The Federal Reserve's anticipated move to raise interest rates for the first time since 2006 has economists projecting a matter of time for rates to come back down. But in the near term, Smith School professor Peter Morici says raising the banks’ overnight borrowing rate “has the potential to push up the cost of mortgages, slow jobs creation and curb stock prices but not always.” Read more...

Smith School Spurs ‘Single Window’ to Transform Trade

Supply chain experts at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business have spurred the implementation of a new system that will accelerate trade and save U.S. businesses money and time. Soon, the current paper-based system required by the U.S. government to import or export cargo will give way to the new “single window,” electronic data collection process, dubbed the International Trade Data System. It becomes mandatory in February 2016.

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