Logistics, Business & Public Policy

Blame Baggage Fees for Long Airport Lines?

Lines at some airports have gotten nightmarish as travelers head into the summer's first holiday weekend. As a result, two U.S. senators have called on airlines to stop charging fees for checked bags as a way to reduce the burden on TSA screeners. Research from Smith School professor Martin Dresner at three Washington-Baltimore airports show how baggage fees do indeed significantly change consumer behavior. Read more...

Walmart Counters Amazon With Its Own 'Prime' Service

Amazon may be synonymous with online shopping and fast shipping, but Walmart isn't ceding the e-commerce field to its hipper rival. Walmart announced last week that it was ramping up its efforts to counter Amazon's very successful Amazon Prime program — for $99 a year, Amazon offers free two-day shipping and a host of other benefits, including free online movies. Walmart is spending some $2 billion to improve its own ShippingPass free-shipping program. Read more...

Saudi Arabia to Partly Privatize World's Biggest Oil Company

Saudi Arabia has announced a plan to spin off about 5 percent of its state-owned oil company, Saudi Aramco. Proceeds from the sale would be poured into a fund that would be used to help diversify the nation's heavily oil-dependent economy, which currently gets 90 percent of its revenue from oil. Simultaneously, the gulf nation also says it's going to ramp up oil production. The Smith School's Charles E. Olson isn't sure the plan adds up. Read more ...

The Opportunities and Challenges of Doing Business with India

Participants at the Robert H. Smith School of Business's 2016 Emerging Markets Forum agreed that India's rapid growth offered opportunities for both local and American businesses, but they disagreed about whether the Indian government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi was moving quickly enough to cut red tape. This was the sixth annual Emerging Markets Forum, organized by the Smith School's Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER). Read more ...

In Trucking Industry, Fights Over Efficiency Versus Safety

Crashes of large trucks are on the rise in the United States. From 2009 to 2015, deaths resulting from collisions involving trucks weighting more than 10,000 pounds rose from 3,380 to 3,903, an increase of 15 percent. Some safety activists believe that Congress bears some blame, and Smith School professor Thomas M. Corsi says they have a point. Read more ...

Unicorns in Uniforms – Sports Management Networking Event

In an industry where curveballs are thrown at you every day, the customers are the loudest and craziest, and your clients can have career-ending emergencies any minute, staying on your toes is not recommended, it’s required. The business of sports is a business unlike any other, and because of this, working in it necessitates a unique set of skills and talents. On Tuesday, April 5, 2016, the Smith School held an all-star panel discussion that dove deep into the lanes of the sports business industry as part of the offerings of the Sports Management Fellows Program.

Amazon: Horning in on FedEx's Turf?

Amazon has announced it is leasing 20 Boeing 767 planes in order to move its own goods, a move that could significantly impact FedEx and UPS, which it now leans on to deliver many of its packages. Some analysts are even wondering if Jeff Bezos's company might be positioning itself to become a competitor to FedEx and UPS. The Smith School's Philip T. Evers dissects the pros and cons of the move. Read more ...

Cuba’s Industries in Waiting

Businesses flourish in the right climate, President Obama told entrepreneurs this week during his visit to Cuba. But despite 15 months of re-established U.S.-Cuba ties, a culture gap and lingering embargo impede trade with the island nation 90 miles from Florida. Smith School professor Kislaya Prasad says some changes will come slowly, but market opportunities already are emerging. Read more...

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