Directory

Brent Goldfarb

Associate Professor

Department: 
Management & Organization
Office: 
4548 Van Munching Hall
Phone: 
(301) 405-9672
Education: 
Ph.D., Stanford University
Bio: 

Dr. Brent Goldfarb is Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship in the M&O Department at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business. Goldfarb's research focuses on how the production and exchange of technology differs from more traditional economic goods, with a focus on the implications on the role of startups in the economy. He focuses on such questions as how do markets and employer policies affect incentives to discover new commercially valuable technologies and when is it best to commercialize them through new technology-based firms? Why do radical technologies appear to be the domain of startups? And how big was the dot.com boom? Copies of Dr. Goldfarb's publications and working papers have been downloaded over 1200 times.

Primary Research Areas

  • Technological Entrepreneurship
  • Technological Change & Policy
  • Applied Econometrics
  • Industrial Organization
  • Economic & Business History
  • Science Policy

 

Research: 

 

  • Myeong-Gu Seo, Brent Goldfarb and Lisa Feldman, “Affect and the Framing Effect: Risk Taking in a Dynamic Investment Game”, forthcoming, Academy Management Journal.
  • Brent Goldfarb, Gerald Marschke and Amy Smith, “Scholarship and Inventive Activity in the University: Complements or Substitutes”, (2009), Economics of Innovation and New Technology, 18(8):743-756. http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/10438590802479148
  • David Kirsch, Brent Goldfarb and Azi Gera, “Form or Substance? The Role of Business Plans in Venture Capital Funding”, (2009) Strategic Management Journal 30: 487–515.
  • Emmanuel Dechenaux, Brent Goldfarb, Scott Shane and Marie Thursby “Appropriability and the Commercialization of Innovation: Evidence from MIT Inventions”, (2008) Management Science 54(5), 893-906.
  • Brent Goldfarb, “The Effect of Government Contracting on Academic Research: Does the Source of Funding Affect Scientific Output?” (2008) Research Policy 37(1), 41-58.
  • Brent Goldfarb, David Kirsch and David Miller, “Was there too Little Entry in the Dot Com Era?” (2007),Journal of Financial Economics 86(1), 100-144.
  • Brent Goldfarb, “Diffusion of General Purpose Technologies: Understanding Patterns in the Electrification of US Manufacturing 1880-1930” (2005) Industrial and Corporate Change, 14(5) 745-773.
  • Brent Goldfarb and Magnus Henrekson, “Bottom-Up vs. Top-Down Policies towards the Commercialization of University Intellectual Property” (2003) Research Policy 32(4) 639-658.
  • B.Goldfarb and M. Henrekson. "Botton-Up vs. Top-Down Policies towards the Commercialization of University Intellectual Property" Research Policy, (forthcoming)
  • B. Goldfarb. "The Effect of Government Contracting on Academic Research: An Empirical Analysis of Reputation in Research Contracting" Discussion Paper No. 00.24, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research