Yajin Wang

Professor Wang received her Ph.D. in Marketing from the Carlson School of Management at University of Minnesota in 2015. Her research focuses on luxury brands and conspicuous consumption, and social/ interpersonal influence on consumer's behavior. Her research has been published in Journal of Consumer Research and Psychological Science, and has been covered in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, BBC News, FOX News, and CNN. She teaches consumer behavior in the undergraduate program.

Target’s Collaboration Machine Sputters

SMITH BRAIN TRUST  When Target opened its doors on May 18, it was with a small wave of excitement.

Its newest designer collaboration – the seashore-themed Vineyard Vines for Target – was there on the shelves, and the retailer was hoping that once again, it would land on a partnership that would drive traffic to the stores and online, and generate some consumer buzz. But what if it didn’t?

De Beers Looking To Alter Diamond Industry – Again

SMITH BRAIN TRUST – De Beers once swore it would never debase itself by selling stones that had been grown in a lab.

Well, that was then.

Now, the global diamond magnate has launched Lightbox, its own line of lab-grown diamonds. It’s pricing them at a fraction of the going rate, in a move that could crush its key rivals in the market for synthetic gems and position the company to once again reshape how the world views the diamond.

Dolce & Gabbana's China Problem

SMITH BRAIN TRUST – Dolce & Gabbana is reeling from a self-inflicted scandal that seems unlikely to go away anytime soon.

The Italian fashion house was forced to cancel a highly anticipated runway show last month in Shanghai, amid social media backlash over an ad campaign that many deemed offensive to Chinese culture. The ad campaign, aimed at promoting the runway show, included video of an Asian woman trying unsuccessfully to use chopsticks to eat Italian foods like pizza and cannoli.

Why Fashion Week Still Matters

SMITH BRAIN TRUST – In an era of social media, where the internet brings far-flung places closer and makes location an almost secondary consideration, there is a week when being in the right place – New York City – still matters. It’s Fashion Week.

“It is precisely because of social media that Fashion Week has become so enduring,” says Yajin Wang, assistant professor of marketing at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business.

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