Peter Morici

Professor Emeritus Peter Morici is a recognized expert on economic policy and international economics. Prior to joining the university, he served as director of the Office of Economics at the U.S. International Trade Commission. He is the author of 18 books and monographs and has published widely in leading public policy and business journals including the Harvard Business Review and Foreign Policy. Morici has lectured and offered executive programs at more than 100 institutions including Columbia University, the Harvard Business School and Oxford University.

Trump’s Infrastructure Pledge Doable, Morici Tells BBC

To what extent will president-elect Donald Trump and Congress deliver on a campaign pledge to rebuild U.S. infrastructure? Smith School professor Peter Morici told BBC News on Wednesday that tightening certain entitlement programs could offset long-term projects like improving the passenger railway system. Trump in his presidential election acceptance speech pledged to fix U.S. inner cities and rebuild highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, schools and hospitals. Read more...

Could Deutsche Bank Fine Spark a New Crisis?

Headquarters of Deutsche Bank in Frankfurt, Germany Deutsche Bank is facing a possible $14-billion fine from U.S. regulators for its alleged role in propping up the housing market in the lead-up to the Great Recession, igniting some fears that the unprecedented sanction poses a new set of risks for the Frankfurt-based bank and the global financial system. "Brace yourselves. Sooner or later, history repeats itself, and the banks will fail again," Smith School professor Peter Morici says. Read more...

Trump Is Winning Twitter: Does It Matter?

Retweets aren't necessarily endorsements, and they definitely aren’t votes. So what can Twitter tell us about the 2016 presidential election? Maybe more than you think, new research from the University of Maryland suggests. For starters, Republican nominee Donald Trump is winning — at Twitter anyway — over Democratic rival Hillary Clinton. The authors of a working paper focused on presidential campaign media coverage and tweeting analyze the effects of Trump's frequent tweeting. Read more...

How Underdogs Can Win in the Service Industry … and Politics

Hiring someone in the service industry? You’re likely focused on finding a competent provider with a successful track record, and it’s unlikely you’ll make extra time to seek character references. This setup stacks the odds against an upstart who wants the opportunity, but has no history of successful deals. But new Smith School research suggests ways to win as an underdog in the service industry — and in a presidential election. Read more...

India Goes Big to Lure Foreign Investment

Foreign firms doing business in India are “entering essentially 29 different countries,” Smith School professor Kislaya Prasad says. That’s because tax systems differ state to state in a market otherwise inherently attractive to foreign investment. But a revamping looms. India’s parliament advanced a goods and services tax on Monday that would reduce the complexity of doing business in India. Read more...

Five Reasons Stocks Will Push Higher

Stock prices are setting new records but could easily charge much higher, says Smith School economist Peter Morici. “The U.S. economy is growing again — about 2.5 percent in the second quarter and going forward — and corporate profits are rising again.” Post-Brexit, the dollar strengthened against foreign currencies, “but overall it remains well below levels recorded earlier this year and last,” Morici says. Read more...

Brexit Countdown: Faculty Perspectives

“Divorces are tough,” says Smith School economist Peter Morici. But Britain nonetheless should break from the “shackles” of its union to a Europe economy locked in ruinous cycles of debt crises and high unemployment. "The EU suffers from chronic slow growth thanks to a smothering bureaucracy and single currency," Morici says. Other Smith School professors foresee challenges if United Kingdom voters opt to separate from the European Union in a referendum on June 23, 2016. Read more...

Entry-Level Managers in OT Pay Crosshairs

Potentially 4.2 million workers are newly eligible for overtime pay when the U.S. Labor Department’s revised rules for the matter take effect Dec. 1, 2016. The White House says the $23,660-to-$47,476 salary threshold rise for overtime pay reinforces the 40-hour workweek as “a pillar of economic security for working families.” But Smith School economist Peter Morici says the rules could backfire for entry-level managers. Read more...

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