Journal of Marketing

Crowdsourcing for Ideas? Do This.

Companies like crowdsourcing for ideas. Innovation tournaments helped Dell create rugged laptops for marine use and helped Lego concoct new toy themes. PepsiCo’s “Do Us a Flavor” tournament led to the creation of “cheesy garlic bread” chips and a brief 8% surge in sales.

But the tournaments don’t always go so swimmingly. (Side-eye to you, Boaty McBoatface.) Many fall short of what they hope to achieve.

Kannan's Paper Selected for Journal of Marketing Award

P.K. Kannan's paper, “The Informational Value of Social Tagging Networks,” has been selected as a finalist for the 2019 Sheth Foundation/Journal of Marketing Award. This award honors the best article published in the Journal of Marketing that has made long-term contributions to the field of marketing. An article will be eligible for consideration to receive this award in the fifth year after its publication.

Can Robots Create Better Movie Trailers?

It takes just a few seconds for a movie or series trailer to grab you — or to lose you.

Netflix and other content studios know this. It’s the reason why those micro-previews begin to autoplay when you hover your mouse over a title on menu screens for Netflix, Hulu or Amazon’s Prime Video. Those few seconds — critical to the studios — can convey so much. They can encapsulate the emotional content of a film, a bit of the story arch perhaps, a glimpse of the characters and more. That is, if they’re done right.

Why It Pays to Win B2B Design Awards

A design award signals quality and boosts business-to-consumer sales. The payoffs are less obvious in business-to-business markets. But research from the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business shows the economic value of earning industry prizes for B2B excellence, despite doubts among managers who often bypass the application process.

Empathy for the Benevolent Underdog

Consumers Respond When Upstarts Tout Their Morality

Brands like Nantucket Nectars, Ben & Jerry's, Toms Shoes, Burt's Bees and Lifeway have thrived against bigger, longer-established competitors. They’ve emphasized modest roots and played up virtues like product health benefits and their social consciousness or environmental consciousness.  Appearing resource-modest, but highly moral, they’re tapping into the adage “consumers gravitate to underdogs.”

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