finance

An Analyst's Actual Impact

Don’t show your bias or slack off in your reports if you’re an analyst at an investment bank and want to move up in your career, finds new research from the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business. The research, from visiting finance professor Oya Altinkiliç, finds that analysts who issue negligent reports – characterized as overly optimistic or too bold with recommendations, or those that simply piggyback on earlier reports or corporate news – jeopardize their careers.

Teaching Finance the Maryland Smith Way

SMITH BRAIN TRUST – Companies run into problems when they focus too much on immediate outcomes. But finance students learn a different approach at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business. “We focus on value maximization, not profit maximization,” says finance professor Michael Faulkender, associate dean of master’s programs. “Value is measured over the life of the activity, not the current outcome.”

Slow and Steady Avoids the Crash

Crashes Can Be Avoided If Traders Move Slowly

Wall Street traders make the most money when they do their best to stay under the radar of other traders by making their trades slow and steady. This strategy also keeps the market from crashing, according to new research from the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business.

The Six Big Bank Risks for 2017

The risk landscape for banks has changed since last year. For starters, Congress and the Trump Administration have started discussions on a regulatory overhaul. And, meanwhile, interest rates are on the rise, and the Federal Reserve is shifting its focus toward maintaining economic gains made in the past few years. All this should further compel banks to embrace enterprise risk management – a relatively nascent strategy that seeks to to identify, assess and prepare for any potential dangers to an organization's operations and objectives as both a day-to-day routine and long-term strategic planning process, says the Smith School's Clifford Rossi. He discusses six big risks facing banks this year. Read more...

Life after Buffett Looks Good for Berkshire

Berkshire Hathaway shareholders should feel reassured to see younger executives stepping up as retirement looms for chairman and CEO Waren Buffett, said David Kass, a Berkshire investor and finance professor at the Smith School. "Ted Weschler and Todd Combs, the two stock pickers Mr. Buffett hired a few years ago as part of his succession plan, have performed well for most of their time at Berkshire," Kass told The Wall Street Journal. Read more...

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