Evan Starr

Evan Starr

Evan Starr is an Assistant Professor of Management & Organization at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan and a bachelor's degree from Denison University. He originally hails from Claremont, California. Starr's current research examines issues at the intersection of human capital accumulation, employee mobility, entrepreneurship, and innovation.

Five Things To Know About Noncompete Clauses

It wasn’t the most talked-about hearing on Capitol Hill this week, but for workers across the economy, the topic was vital.

Evan Starr, assistant professor of management and organization at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business, testified Tuesday before the House Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial, and Administrative Law, about competition in labor markets.

When Noncompete Agreements Hurt Everyone

When employees sign noncompete agreements, they are bound from changing jobs within their industry or breaking out to start a company on their own. These agreements have been upheld in most states based on an employee’s freedom to enter into contracts. But what are the consequences for the labor market as a whole when these contracts are enforceable and used en masse? New research finds that the mass use of enforceable noncompetes is associated with negative consequences for the whole labor market, even for those who don’t have to sign them.

Seven Career Transition Tips From Usain Bolt

SMITH BRAIN TRUST – Michael Jordan has done it. Brock Lesnar has done it. And now Usain Bolt is trying to do it, too. The career transition.

Bolt, an eight-time Olympic gold medalist and world champion sprinter from Jamaica, is on trial with an Australian A-League soccer team. Many consider him to be past the prime age to learn the technical skills of a new sport. But Bolt isn’t listening. He’s determined to win a permanent spot with the Central Coast Mariners.

Trapped But Not Lost With Limited Mobility

Nobody likes to feel trapped. But employees benefit in certain ways when two factors combine to pin them in place, making it harder for them to exit their organizations with intellectual and social capital. New research co-authored by Evan Starr at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business shows that employees tethered to their firms by noncompete clauses and nontransferable skills receive more on-the-job training and often get hired with less experience.

How Noncompete Clauses Can Backfire

Enforceability of Agreements Creates Screening Effect

U.S. companies worried about knowledge leakage should be careful what they wish for when they lobby state lawmakers to strengthen the enforceability of noncompete clauses. New research from the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business shows unintended consequences when the contract addendums are given teeth.

Feds to Scrutinize Noncompete Clauses

The White House has announced it will confront an issue that might be producing inefficiencies in the labor market and suppressing workers' wages: The overuse — and abuse — of noncompete clauses, which prevent people from moving from one company to another in the same field. A new White House paper on the topic, as well as a Treasury Department report that precedes it, draws heavily on research by professor Evan Starr at the Smith School. Read more...

Evan Starr

Evan Starr is an Assistant Professor of Management & Organization at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan and a bachelor's degree from Denison University. He originally hails from Claremont, California. Starr's current research examines issues at the intersection of human capital accumulation, employee mobility, entrepreneurship, and innovation.

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