Brent Goldfarb

Brent Goldfarb

Dr. Brent Goldfarb is Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship in the M&O Department at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business. Goldfarb's research focuses on how the production and exchange of technology differs from more traditional economic goods, with a focus on the implications on the role of startups in the economy. He focuses on such questions as how do markets and employer policies affect incentives to discover new commercially valuable technologies and when is it best to commercialize them through new technology-based firms? Why do radical technologies appear to be the domain of startups? And how big was the dot.com boom? Copies of Dr. Goldfarb's publications and working papers have been downloaded over 1200 times.

Crowdfunding Best for Community Startups, Panelists Say

Crowdfunding makes sense for a neighborhood hairstylist or dry cleaner, but not so much for a tech startup aspiring to be the next Facebook, experts said May7-9, 2015, during the Smith Entrepreneurship Research Conference at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business.SEC-amended rules that take effect June 19 undervalue the distinction, crowdfunding panelists said at the event staged by the Center for Financial Policy and Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship. Read more...

Uber Scores Win Against 'Inferior' Taxis, Professor Says

Traditional taxi operators have claimed victory with legislation that would legalize Uber, Lyft and other ride-share companies in Maryland, but Smith School professor Brent Goldfarb shares a different perspective with the Baltimore Sun. "They've got to claim some victory, but this is a flat-out loss for them," Goldfarb says. "For a win they would have had to put real restrictions on Uber's ability to operate because they can't compete on product. They have an inferior product." Read more...

Streaming, Copyright Law and the Future of Music

The way songwriters and performers get paid in the U.S. is a mess, shaped to a surprising degree by government regulation. Some of the basic rules are so old they were crafted to prevent a monopoly in the player-piano industry. This month the U.S. Copyright Office proposed reforms that could affect the bottom line of streaming services like Pandora and put more money in the pockets of artists. Smith Professor Brent Goldfarb shares insights. Read more...

Are One-Third of Strategic Management Studies Bogus?

How much confidence should you have in the findings published in the top strategic management journals? Less than you might think, according to new research from the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business. Smith Professor Brent Goldfarb and coauthor Andrew King of Dartmouth's Tuck School of Business estimate that 24 to 40 percent of the findings in five top journals are likely the result of chance. Read more...

Perfect the Business, Not the Business Plan

Broadcast Dates: Feb. 5, 2009, 7:30 p.m.; Feb. 8, 2009, 7:30 a.m.; Feb. 9, 2009, 4:30 a.m.

 

Big news for entrepreneurs: Don’t waste your time on a business plan.

In this edition of Smith Business Close-Upwith the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business, Dr. Brent Goldfarbtalks about his new research that finds the way a business plan is written has no bearing on whether a company receives funding.

Research Sheds New Light on Dot-com Bust

College Park, MD November 8, 2006 New research on the dot-com era from the University of Marylands Robert H. Smith School of Business reveals despite significant losses suffered by investors, nearly 50 percent of 1990s dot-com startups survived at least five years. This success rate is better than or on par with other emerging industries, contradicting the traditional view that the majority of Internet companies landed belly up.

Brent Goldfarb

Dr. Brent Goldfarb is Associate Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship in the M&O Department at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business. Goldfarb's research focuses on how the production and exchange of technology differs from more traditional economic goods, with a focus on the implications on the role of startups in the economy. He focuses on such questions as how do markets and employer policies affect incentives to discover new commercially valuable technologies and when is it best to commercialize them through new technology-based firms?

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