Bennet Zelner

Bennet A. Zelner

Bennet A. Zelner (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2001) studies the strategies that firms use to manage the diverse political, social, and economic institutions they encounter when doing business abroad. Much of his research focuses on infrastructure industries recently subject to market-oriented reform—such as privatization, deregulation, and liberalization—and the challenges that such environments pose for private investors.

Should Everyone Receive a Basic Income?

At a time when robots and other forms of automation appear poised to edge out wide swaths of the global workforce, several pilot projects and at least one documentary film are exploring the idea of universal basic income – free money for everyone, enough to cover basic expenses. It's a big idea that dates back at least to 1795 in the United States, with revolutionary activist and author Thomas Paine. Martin Luther King, Jr. touted its merits in the 1960s, as did libertarian economist Milton Friedman, who lauded the virtues of a negative income tax. In 1971 President Richard Nixon wrote a proposal along those lines. But the notion of universal basic income has perhaps never been as relevant around the world as it is now, say experts. Read more...

Bennet A. Zelner

Bennet A. Zelner (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2001) studies the governance of economic and political relations. His primary interests include inclusive models of economic development, distributed governance, regenerative economics, and mental healthcare delivery. He also has a longstanding interest in the process of institutional change, which he has previously studied in the context of neoliberal policy reform and the diffusion of Anglo-American shareholder capitalism, and is now examining in relation to the legalization of psychedelic medicines.

Subscribe to RSS - Bennet Zelner