Lessons From Penicillin In The Race Against COVID-19

How WWII-era research may help in battle the current pandemic

Mar 19, 2020
Management

SMITH BRAIN TRUST  Researchers who scrambled to fight infections during World War II discovered more than the power of penicillin. They also learned important lessons about human enterprise that can guide team efforts today to stop COVID-19, Maryland Smith's Rajshree Agarwal writes in Forbes.

She revisits the story of Alexander Fleming, the Scottish biologist who stumbled upon the world’s first antibiotic in a petri dish in 1928. The journey of his “wonder drug” was far from simple.

Read more in Forbes.

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About the Expert(s)

Rajshree Agarwal

Rajshree Agarwal is the Rudolph Lamone Professor of Entrepreneurship and Strategy and director of the Ed Snider Center for Enterprise and Markets at the University of Maryland. She studies the evolution of industries, firms and individual careers, as fostered by the twin engines of innovation and enterprise. Agarwal's scholarship uses an interdisciplinary lens to provide insights on strategic innovation for new venture creation and for firm renewal. She routinely publishes in leading journals in strategy and entrepreneurship. An author of more than 60 studies, her research has been cited more than 10,000 times, received numerous best paper awards, and funded by grants from various foundations, including the Kauffman Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation and the National Science Foundation. She is currently the co-editor of the Strategic Management Journal and has previously served in co-editor and senior editor roles at Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal and Organization Science respectively.

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