Lessons From Penicillin In The Race Against COVID-19

How WWII-era research may help in battle the current pandemic

Mar 19, 2020
Management

SMITH BRAIN TRUST  Researchers who scrambled to fight infections during World War II discovered more than the power of penicillin. They also learned important lessons about human enterprise that can guide team efforts today to stop COVID-19, Maryland Smith's Rajshree Agarwal writes in Forbes.

She revisits the story of Alexander Fleming, the Scottish biologist who stumbled upon the world’s first antibiotic in a petri dish in 1928. The journey of his “wonder drug” was far from simple.

Read more in Forbes.

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About the Expert(s)

Rajshree Agarwal

Rajshree Agarwal is the Rudolph P. Lamone Chair and Professor in Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland and director of the Ed Snider Center for Enterprise and Markets. Rajshree’s research interests focus on the implications of entrepreneurship and innovation for industry and firm evolution. Her recent projects examine the micro-foundations of macro phenomena, linking knowledge diffusion among firms, industries, and regions to the underlying mechanisms of employee entrepreneurship and mobility.

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