Give Outdated Tech a Second Life

Mar 11, 2018
Technology

Women Leading Research: Wedad J. Elmaghraby

SMITH BRAIN TRUST – In the technology world, what’s old is rarely new again. Indeed, technology revolves around near-constant innovation that propels society forward, which means older generation models of your favorite devices are regularly discarded in favor of their newer generation counterparts. This cycle can be problematic for tech OEMs (original equipment manufacturers), who find themselves selling new generation models only to be left with returned merchandise from older generations. Moreover, customers migrating to newer generations of products are often unsure about how to dispose of their older but functional devices.

Online liquidation auctions have emerged as a potential solution, operating as secondary marketplaces where this equipment can be bought and resold. Along with a team of co-researchers, Wedad J. Elmaghraby, professor of management science and operations management at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business, collaborated with a large U.S.-based wholesale liquidator for IT equipment to explore the design of these liquidation auctions. They aimed to understand how the simultaneous sale of multiple generations of used iPads influences auction prices.

“Clearly, a solution to this rapid turnover of technology lies in the creation of profitable and efficient secondary markets for IT equipment that, on the one hand, reduce the direct impact of older and usable technological assets on landfills, and on the other hand, facilitate finding new homes for this IT equipment,” the researchers explained. “Within the larger context of secondary markets for IT equipment, understanding the dynamics of demand across multiple generations and quality grades of equipment is critical in designing such B2B markets.”

What Elmaghraby and her team discovered is that a complex interplay of demand and final prices exists across iPad generations. The researchers’ study suggests that by changing the starting prices across iPads of varying generations and quality, it’s possible to strategically direct demand toward specific products and increase those auctions final prices. Most importantly, Elmaghraby and team find that the current strategy of setting starting prices low across all products is generally not always advisable, as it has a dampening effect on total revenue.

“Marketing scholars have argued that reducing the spread of prices in such differentiated markets may focus buyers' attention on quality and fit between their needs and those features offered by the products,” the researchers wrote. 

Their study resulted in a finding that supports that theory: In the used iPad auction setting, it’s possible that reducing the average price distance between the lower market's prices and those of the higher quality market make the higher quality product more attractive by providing higher quality per dollar value.

“Our experiments indicate that, by manipulating starting prices, the B2B auctioneer can enhance his recovery rates from auctions on any given day, without in any way changing his cost structure,” they wrote. “We hope that our work will help kickstart more research in the vital and ecologically important area of secondary markets for IT products.”

Read more: Starting Prices in Liquidation Auctions for IT Equipment: Evidence from Field Experiments is featured in Production and Operations Management.

Wedad J. Elmaghraby is an Associate Professor of Management Science in the Department of Management Science and Operations Management

Research interests: Business-to-Business procurement auctions and pricing that bridges economics and operations management. Her work incorporates themes of behavior, judgment heuristics, and biases in decision-making all with the aim of better understanding the behavioral influences in auctions and pricing decisions.

Selected accomplishments: With 17 studies published in refereed journals, she has served as an area editor for MS, M&SOM and POMS journals and has been invited as keynote speaker for the Behavioral Operations Management International Symposium in Shanghai, China, as well as the Cologne (Germany) Workshop on Auctions and Procurement, and as a Fellow to the ESEI Market Design Center in Zurich, Switzerland.

Women Leading Research: Wedad Elmaghraby

About this series: The Smith School faculty is celebrating Women’s History Month 2018 in partnership with ADVANCE, an initiative to transform the University of Maryland by investing in a culture of inclusive excellence. Daily faculty spotlights support activities from the school’s Office of Diversity Initiatives, starting with the seventh annual Women Leading Women forum on March 1, 2018.

Other fearless ideas from:  Rajshree Agarwal  |  Ritu Agarwal  |  T. Leigh Anenson  |  Kathryn M. Bartol  |  Christine Beckman  |  Margrét Bjarnadóttir  |  M. Cecilia Bustamante  |  Jessica M. Clark  |  Rellie Derfler-Rozin  |  Waverly Ding  |  Wedad J. Elmaghraby  |  Rosellina Ferraro  |  Rebecca Hann  | Amna Kirmani  |  Hanna Lee  |  Hui Liao  |  Jennifer Carson Marr  |  Wendy W. Moe  |  Courtney Paulson  |  Louiqa Raschid  |  Rebecca Ratner  |  Debra L. Shapiro  |  M. Susan Taylor  |  Niratcha (Grace) Tungtisanont  |  Vijaya Venkataramani  |  Janet Wagner  |  Yajin Wang  |  Yajun Wang  |  Liu Yang  |  Jie Zhang  |  Lingling Zhang

Photo credit: enzozo

GET SMITH BRAIN TRUST DELIVERED
TO YOUR INBOX EVERY WEEK

SUBSCRIBE NOW

About the Expert(s)

Wedad J. Elmaghraby is a Professor of Management Science at the Robert H. Smith School of Business, University of Maryland, College Park. Prior to joining the Smith School, she was on the faculty of the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and NYU Stern School of Business in the Operations Management group. Her current research interests are (1) the design of competitive procurement auctions in business-to-business markets and (2) pricing in markets where buyers behave strategically. Her current areas of application are e-commerce, logistics, supply chain management in the electronics industry and energy markets.

More In

Technology

The Future of Cash

This is the state of money in 2019. Cash money is becoming increasingly less essential to our lives, replaced by a wider swath of other ways to pay. And it’s changing everything about what it means to be a consumer.

Dec 17, 2018
Survive Holiday Travel, With Tips From the Experts

Maryland Smith faculty share their best travel hacks, from traveling early to the best ways to tolerate traffic, to make your holidays easier.

Nov 15, 2018
Three Ways Amazon Is Shaking Up U.S. Healthcare

First it was book selling, and then it was retail of all kinds. Later came cloud storage services, streaming entertainment and online advertising. Now with three big moves, Amazon is disrupting healthcare.

Jul 02, 2018