Graduate Certificate (Online)

Program is currently on hiatus and may return in the future.

The Graduate Certificate of Professional Studies in Risk, Compliance, and the Law (GC-RCL) offered through the Center for the Study of Business Ethics, Regulation, & Crime (C-BERC) at the University of Maryland is intended to provide post-baccalaureate training and knowledge in the interdisciplinary fields of business law, ethics, criminology, and accounting. This program, along with C-BERC, is a joint effort between the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Robert H. Smith School of Business.

GC-RCL will focus on forensic audit investigations, software utilization as applied to discerning potentially fraudulent activity, and a detailed understanding of businesses' legal obligations and the origin and consequences of non-compliance. The program will provide recent business and behavioral and social science graduates and current attorneys and compliance officers an opportunity to gain a specific skill set and knowledge base including being able to understand and effectively implement the latest developments in empirically supported compliance strategies, investigation and audit practices (including the use of sophisticated software packages and statistical analysis to identify reporting and data aberrations).

Characteristics of the program

The Graduate Certificate of Professional Studies in Risk, Compliance, and the Law offers post-baccalaureate training and knowledge focused on forensic audit investigations, software utilization as applied to discerning potentially fraudulent activity, and a detailed understanding of businesses' legal obligations and the origin and consequences of non-compliance. This training includes a broad foundation on accounting and forensic auditing, legal and regulatory compliance, theories and empirical research on white-collar crime and the victimization of business, and exposure to techniques that electronically capture and integrate data from a variety of different sources to assist managerial decision-making in such areas as fraud detection. GC-RCL is designed to build an interdisciplinary knowledge base and skill set drawing from accounting, criminology, law, and statistics that will translate into career opportunities for recent business and behavioral/social science undergraduates and provide additional training for compliance officers and attorneys who already work in business and/or auditing settings. Graduates will be able to understand and effectively implement the latest developments in empirically supported compliance strategies, investigation, and audit practices (including the use of sophisticated software packages and statistical analysis to identify reporting and data aberrations). They will also learn about corporate ethical and legal obligations, both domestically and internationally; strategies to meet and maintain compliance; how to conduct investigations, and attorney-client privilege.

As part of this program, lectures and will be delivered across the Internet using online technology. On occasion, students may attend online lectures in real-time via the use of webcams and headsets with microphones. Additionally, some courses in this program will be project-based, enabling the students to apply their skills in real-time on real-life business problems. Online lectures (lecture slides, presentation, and Q&A interactions) are video-archived for reviewing.

Eligibility

The admissions process for the Graduate Certificate of Professional Studies in Risk, Compliance, and the Law is designed to determine whether the program is a good fit for your background, education, and professional development goals.

Domestic students must have:

  • Received at least a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university with at least a 3.0 grade point average (on a 4.0 scale).
  • Experience, education, and/or interest in fields of business law, ethics, criminology, and accounting.
  • GRE scores or any other standardized scores are not required for this program.

International students must have:

  • Received at least a baccalaureate degree at a foreign university or college equivalent to that of a U.S. institution.
  • A TOEFL score of 100 or higher unless otherwise exempt. See information on the University of Maryland Graduate School website for specific admissions requirements , including minimum scores.
  • GRE scores are not required for this program.

The University of Maryland is dedicated to maintaining a vibrant international graduate student community. We encourage applications from international students, however, as a fully online program we are not able to sponsor any educational visa for travel to the University of Maryland.

Application Requirements

University of Maryland's Graduate Application Process

The application is available through the University of Maryland, Graduate School's ApplyYourself/Hobsons application system. Before completing the application, applicants must check the Admissions Requirements site for specific instructions for this program.

As required by the Graduate School, all application materials are to be submitted electronically.

For more information, including applying, Graduate School and program specific requirements, visit the Graduate School website .

NOTE :

In the Graduate application, Graduate Education Intent section, select the following:

  • College/School: College of Behavioral and Social Sciences
  • Intended Program of Study: Risk/Compliance and Law (Z108)
  • Degree: CERT GR

Within the online application, you will be able to upload:

  • Statement of purpose
  • Resume/CV
  • Letters of recommendation (professional and/or academic references that acknowledge your intellectual/academic ability and ability to perform in a graduate program)
    • You will list your references' contact information and they each will be sent a link via email to upload their recommendation letter.
    • You will also be able to pay the non-refundable application fee of $75 USD

Completed applications are reviewed by an admissions committee in each graduate degree program. The recommendations of the committees are submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School, who will make the final admission decision.

Tuition

Initial application fee: $75 USD

Tuition per course: $3,000 USD

Please note: Students are responsible for purchasing their own books, software, and other supplies as required by each instructor. Students may be required to pay additional UMD student fees (which range from around $60 USD-$80 USD per semester).

List Of Courses

Courses are offered online quarterly, so the sequence of courses can be completed in one year. The program has four-course requirements with business crime/regulation as a common theme.

White-Collar Crime and Victimization, 3 credits
Faculty: Sally Simpson and others

The history, definitions, categories and trends of white-collar crime within the U.S. and globally. The corporation as offender and the corporation as victim; Data sources and measurement; Theories of offending and victimization; Costs of crime, correlates of crime, and risks; Internal compliance systems; Enforcement strategies (deterrence/compliance); responsive regulation; enforcement pyramid; Policy assessment.

Accounting and Its Uses in the Forensic Process, 3 credits
Faculty: David Hilton

IMPORTANT NOTE : While the standard session date for this summer session is July 8–August 16, this class is only a three-week course from July 29–August 16 .

This course will explore ways that accounting is used in forensic examinations. The course will begin with an introduction to accounting for the uninitiated. Topics covered in the introduction may include an introduction to bookkeeping, key accounts, financial statements and their composition, and concepts in managerial accounting. The course will then cover principles of forensic accounting and the use of financial statement analysis in the forensic process. Topics covered in forensic accounting may include the following: Common fraud schemes in the areas of fraudulent financial reporting, misappropriation of resources, corruption and illegal acts; How fraud schemes typically appear in the accounting records and financial statements of an enterprise or agency; The use of financial statement analysis and analytics to detect fraud; Differences between a routine financial statement audit and a forensic audit; The limitations on financial statement audits in the discovery of fraud; How budgeting issues in managerial accounting can pressure managers to act unethically or illegally. Interactive sessions will allow students to apply some of the knowledge from the course in a practical setting. Course participants will study both cases and problems related to forensic accounting.

Legal and Regulatory Compliance, 3 credits
Faculty: TBA

This course will explore fundamental compliance principles. Topics to be covered may include the following: global anti-corruption law (including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the UK Bribery Act, the OECD's Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions, Canada's Corruption of Public Officials Act, and the Inter-American Convention Against Corruption); Sarbanes-Oxley compliance (including certification requirements, whistleblower protection, and audit committees); financial integrity (including money laundering, insider trading, market manipulation, conflicts of interest, and privacy); and internal investigations/attorney-client privilege. Because the scope of compliance is not limited to corruption and financial integrity, the course may include compliance issues in the following additional subject areas: antitrust, food and drug, environmental, occupational safety and health, and/or others.

Investigative Tools and Data Analysis, 3 credits
Faculty: Arnie Greenland and others

Techniques to electronically capture and integrate data from a variety of different sources aimed to assist managerial decision-making in such areas as fraud detection. Focus on large datasets for data mining/machine learning tools for classifications (such as decision trees, neural networks, techniques to recognize patterns in the data and regression modeling and statistics to aid prediction). Learning and utilizing appropriate software (e.g., XLMiner). Computer-aided analysis techniques for detecting and investigating white-collar offenses, issues related to the collective use of digital evidence and the collection of data from electronic devices. Extensive use of case studies as examples.

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