Martin Loeb

Cybersecurity Forum Imagines a World Without Secrets

Cybersecurity experts hired to lock down technology often overlook the vulnerability of another machine: the human brain. That was the warning of David Balenson, a senior computer scientist at SRI International, during the 12th annual Forum on Financial Information Systems and Cybersecurity, sponsored jointly by the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy and Robert H. Smith School of Business.

12th Annual Cybersecurity Forum on Jan 13

Cyber attacks on companies worldwide increased by 48 percent from 2013 to 2014 as roughly 42.8 million data security breaches cost firms hundreds to potentially millions of dollars (according to this recent study). With cybercrime against organizations flourishing, researchers and senior executives from business and government agencies will engage in a daylong Forum on Financial Information Systems and Cybersecurity: A Public Policy Perspective on Jan. 13, 2016, in Van Munching Hall at the University of Maryland.

Smith School VITA Program Files for Success

As tax season comes to a close, the new Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) chapter at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business celebrated their first season of operation, and almost 100 returns filed successfully.

The VITA program was established by site coordinator Samuel Handwerger and professor Martin Loeb, with help from Wei Wu ’13 and 12 core student volunteers.

UMD Smith School of Business Cybersecurity Experts Win Major Homeland Security Grant

College Park, Md. – November 14, 2012 – World-leading cybersecurity researchers at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business won a significant grant from the Department of Homeland Security to develop economic models for cybersecurity investments. Professors Lawrence Gordon and Martin Loeb – along with colleague William Lucyshyn from the School of Public Policy -- received one of just 34 contracts awarded to 29 academic and research institutions for research and development of solutions to cybersecurity challenges.

University of Maryland Invites Essayists to Take a Byte Out of Cybersecurity

College Park, Md. – January 21, 2009 – The University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business invites innovative solutions to one of the 21st century’s most pressing concerns – how to allocate scarce resources to protect the massive amount of personal and sensitive data available on computer networks and online. The selection committee is now accepting essay submissions for the Gordon Prize in Managing Cybersecurity Resources.

Gordon & Loeb Cybersecurity Research Finds New Audience in China

Lawrence A. Gordon, Ernst & Young Alumni Professor of Managerial Accounting, and Martin Loeb, professor of accounting and information assurance and Deloitte & Touche Faculty Fellow, are pioneers in the economics and financial management of cybersecurity resources. A brief overview of recent key research is now being made available to Chinese scholars through a translation on Gordon's Web site. It is the pairs first foray to directly connect their counterparts in China with the results of their research.

Gordon-Loeb Model for Investing in Information Security

The security of information is a fundamental concern to organizations operating in the modern digital economy. There are technical, behavioral, and organizational aspects related to this concern. There are also economic aspects of information security. One important economic aspect of information security (including cybersecurity) revolves around deriving the right amount an organization should invest in protecting information. Organizations also need to determine the most appropriate way to allocate such an investment.

Smith Leadership Series Presents A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Cybersecurity Resources

In the past few years, Americans have come to learn that security initiatives are expensive and, many times, unsuccessful. However, high cost security is more than a government issue, it is also an important business issue. In a digital economy, businesses must work hard to keep client and employee information safe and private. Unfortunately many businesses spend millions of dollars on security initiatives that never deliver the promised results.


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