David Kass

An Unexpected Buying Opportunity for Berkshire

What do you do if you lose $7 billion in one week following the Brexit vote? If you’re Warren Buffett and his portfolio managers at Berkshire Hathaway, you go shopping. “With over $60 billion of cash on Berkshire's balance sheet, it’s likely they invested some of these funds in individual stocks they had been following, which would have become more attractive after this sudden decline,” Smith School finance professor David Kass says. Read more...

Making Sense of Berkshire’s Bite of Apple

Berkshire Hathaway’s small but much-discussed bite of Apple suggests a vote of confidence for a tech giant that had been sliding in the stock market. It also hints at how Warren Buffett’s holding company will do business after the 85-year-old "Oracle of Omaha" no longer is there, Smith School professor David Kass says. Revealed Monday in a regulatory filing, the roughly $1 billion investment of 9.8 million shares represents about 1 percent of Berkshire’s $129 billion portfolio value. Read more...

Insights from Buffett's Analysis of 2008 Financial Crisis

Clinical professor of finance David Kass is a Berkshire Hathaway shareholder and a close follower of Warren Buffett’s investment strategy since 1980. He says the recent release of a 103-page "Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission Interview of Warren Buffett" provides "interesting insights into the causes of the financial crisis, its consequences on the shareholders of financial institutions, and on stock market valuation.” Read more...

Buffett’s Letter: Don’t Bet Against the U.S. Economy

Vexed politicians and Election 2016 voters might scoff. But investor Warren Buffett’s economic outlook, expressed in a letter and subsequent CNBC interview, is cautiously optimistic. Smith School finance professor David Kass, a close follower of Buffett’s investment strategy since 1980 and a Berkshire shareholder, says the view isn't unexpected. Read more...

Backlash Against Eye-Popping Drug Prices

Martin Shkreli became the Internet villain of the fall (some publications used much harsher language) when his company, Turing Pharmaceuticals, acquired the rights to Daraprim, which treats a condition called toxoplasmosis — and promptly raised the per-pill price from $13.50 to $750. The move was entirely legal, but a bipartisan U.S. Senate committee is looking into what one senator called "price gouging" in the industry. Read more...

A Consumer Goods Behemoth Faces Pressure

Is it time for the biggest consumer products group in the world to be broken up? Procter & Gamble may account for more than half of the market for laundry care in the United States (Tide, Gain, Downy), more than two-thirds of the market for razors and blades (Gillette), and 15.5 percent of the beauty and personal care market (Pantene, and on and on). That's added up to a market capitalization of more than $200 billion. But P&G’s sales have dropped by nearly 9 percent since 2012. Smith School professor David Kass shares insights. Read more...

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - David Kass