News at Smith

Jan 16, 2016

Headlines have been gloomy for Brazil in recent weeks: “Worst Recession Since 1901.” “Rio Olympics Face Deep Cuts.” “Pain to Deepen in 2016.” Even the samba has turned sober for the Carnival that will start on Feb. 5. Smith School strategy professor Paulo Prochno sees three fronts converging into a perfect storm. Read more...

Jan 14, 2016

Hackers have looted data at Target, JPMorgan Chase, the U.S. government (and, yes, the University of Maryland). So how safe are the paperless voting machines that some states will use in the 2016 presidential election? "Voters as well as the poll workers and election officials have no way to verify that their ballots are recorded, transmitted and tabulated properly," says one speaker at a Smith School cybersecurity forum.

Jan 14, 2016
World Class Faculty & Research

Just when it looked like the smartphone world had been winnowed down to two heavyweights, Apple and Samsung — with the also-rans fighting over the scraps — a Chinese company that's basically unknown in the United States is elbowing its way into the fray. Huawei's consumer sales income jumped about 70 percent last year, largely thanks to sales in Asia, Europe, and Latin America, and its consumer business group had about $

Jan 14, 2016
World Class Faculty & Research

Cybersecurity experts hired to lock down technology often overlook the vulnerability of another machine: the human brain. That was the warning of David Balenson, a senior computer scientist at SRI International, during the 12th annual Forum on Financial Information Systems and Cybersecurity, sponsored jointly by the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy and Robert H. Smith School of Business.

Jan 13, 2016
World Class Faculty & Research

Time had run out in 1980. An earth capable of sustaining only a limited number of hungry consumers had been pushed too far, and “The Population Bomb” described by conservation biologist Paul Ehrlich would soon explode. Most in academia accepted the dire warnings about overpopulation and resource depletion. But the late Smith School economist Julian Simon listened to the arguments and recognized a flaw.

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