Alumni

 Alumni from the Robert H. Smith School of Business are a diverse group of business managers, community leaders, entrepreneurs, and corporate executives. At the Center for Social Value Creation, we value our relationships and look for unique ways to engage alumni on special projects with current students. If you are a Smith alumnus applying your business education toward a better world, we want to hear from you!

Meet some of the Smith alumni involved with the center. 

Dave Feldman

Dave Feldman
Executive Director, Bethesda Green

Being a social entrepreneur is anything but boring. Dave Feldman, Executive Director of Bethesda Green and a Smith School alumnus (both undergraduate and MBA), can readily attest to this. Five years ago, Feldman had a vision for building sustainable communities and created a model that included collaboration between local business, government, nonprofits and citizens. “It’s about leveraging what already exists, and creating what doesn’t exist,” Feldman said. 

Jenna Gebel

Jenna Gebel
National Resource Development Specialist, Goodwill Industries International

Before starting her career at Goodwill Industries International (GII), Jenna Gebel honed her skills as part of the 2010 Social Enterprise Symposium student leadership team, and as a member of the AshokaU Terp Changemakers. Through an Ashoka conference, Jenna was able to strike up a conversation with an executive from Goodwill® that eventually led to her interest in the company and ultimately to her first position at GII as a National Family Support Program Assistant. 

Jim Loving

Jim Loving
Managing Consultant, Loving Works Corporation

Jim Loving is a Business Development Executive, specializing in Energy, Environment, & Sustainability for U.S. Federal Government work. He’s a company man, having risen up from an initial position as a Customer Service Representative less than a year out of school to his current post. And he doesn’t dodge around the question of whether you need to have an idea of your future from the get-go— perhaps invaluable advice for any of today’s undergraduates with foggy ideas of what the future may hold.