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Nov 29, 2016
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Top government economists, plus academic experts and industry leaders recently gathered to discuss the outlook for financial markets and the economy under President-elect Donald Trump.

Nov 16, 2016
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Over your lifetime, you'll earn quite a bit of money. But it might never feel like a lot, depending on how you spend, save and prioritize. November is Financial Literacy Month, and Smith School professor Albert "Pete" Kyle has some smart saving advice for every decade of your money-making life. Read more...

Nov 10, 2016
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The question of who will be the 45th U.S. president has been answered with the upset victory of Republican Donald Trump. Now many are asking what U.S. economic policy will look like under his administration. Smith School experts will explore some of the larger economic questions facing the new administration at a pair of events next week in Washington, D.C. Here is a snapshot of some of the big issues they will discuss....

Nov 03, 2016
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Though polls show Hillary Clinton losing ground to Donald Trump, her advantage in the betting markets continues. Ireland-based PaddyPower still shows Clinton with a 75 percent probability of winning, despite an alert from FBI director James Comey that the Clinton email investigation still has life. Smith School finance professor David Kass discusses how the 2016 U.S. presidential election would move market...

Nov 01, 2016
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Professors at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business placed No. 1 in the world for "faculty quality" in The Economist's 2016 full-time MBA rankings, marking the third consecutive year atop the category. Prior to the current run, the school finished No. 2 for faculty quality in 2013. Overall, the Smith School finished No. 47 globally and No. 32 in the United States in the latest rankings, released Oct. 13.

Sep 13, 2016
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Smith School finance professor Clifford Rossi says fraud allegations against Wells Fargo represent a failure across the board to identify and address a culture that emboldened "employees to elevate wrongdoing and risky activities without fear of retribution." Rather than facing discipline, some employees received bonuses after inflating sales numbers by secretly opening millions of fake accounts for customers...

Aug 31, 2016
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Berkshire Hathaway chairman and CEO Warren Buffett’s 86th birthday on Tuesday prompted a CNBC writer to explore Buffett’s interpretation of luck as a success factor in business. Buffett discussed the topic in a 2013 meeting with MBAs, including a group led by Smith School professor David Kass. He took notes in 2013 and summarized Buffett’s take for CNBC this week. Kass says Buffett has stressed the importance of luck...

Aug 24, 2016
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Investors fed up with a market “rigged” in favor of high-frequency traders, who use sophisticated software and algorithms to trade in and out of stocks in milliseconds, now have a place of their own, the Investor’s Exchange (IEX) Group. It went live on Aug. 19, 2016, as an alternative to NASDAQ, the New York Stock Exchange and other SEC-approved exchanges. Proponents of the new exchange say their “speed bump” model, based on a 35...

Aug 23, 2016
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Executives at pharmaceutical company Mylan have come under attack for giving themselves raises while boosting the price of a lifesaving injection device by more than 400 percent over the past nine years. Smith School finance professor David Kass compares the situation to a 2015 scandal, when hedge fund manager and pharmaceutical CEO Martin Shkreli raised the price of the AIDS drug Daraprim from $13.50 a pill to $750...

Aug 04, 2016
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Democrats and Republicans are calling to reinstate a version of the Glass-Steagall Act, which from 1933 to 1999 separated investment banking (underwriting, issuing and distributing financial instruments like stocks and bonds) from commercial banking (deposit-taking and lending) activities. Are legislators about to break up the big banks? Don't count on it, say professors Cliff Rossi and Phillip L. Swagel...

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